Discussions By Condition: Eye conditions

Eye Boogers

Posted In: Eye conditions 17 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • August 16, 2006
  • 07:28 PM

Can some one tell me if this is true. I was told there was a bug or parasite the could live in your eye. This bug's excrement accumulates in the corners of your eyes.
I am aware that the eye naturally clenses itself at night and the build up in the corner of your eyes is a result of that clensing but need to know if there is any truth to the "eye bug" thing. If so, what type of bug is it?? An Ameoba? I can't find anything on the net.

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17 Replies:

  • Sounds like another product of social fear-mongering A.K.A. urban myth. Never heard of such as thing. I doubt any kind of insect or bacteria/virus could live inside the eye and cause only such a tame symptom as eye boogers. Heck, I thought eye boogers were just accumulated fluids from the tear ducts. I've heard it the stuff referred to as "sleep" as well.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 23, 2006
    • 02:55 AM
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  • An eye bug?! Highly unlikely. Its droppings would affect your eye in one way or another. I often get mucous strands and mucous blobs in my eye - due to allergies, i doubt there is anything living in my eye otherwise i would have had some more signs!!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 12, 2007
    • 02:47 PM
    • 0
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  • This thread reminds me of a skit that "Rosana Dana Dana" did on Saturday Night Live years ago. I still laugh when I think of Gilda Radners take on "that little white thing in the corner of your eye. Hokey
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • the build-up in the inner corners of the eyes in the morning (aka, "eye boogers", "sleep") are the result of congealed mucin and lipid overnight.basically any ocular surface infection can lead to an increase in crusting/build-up/discharge. the most common infections are viral (in adults) in developed countries, followed by bacteria. a variety of parasites can affect the ocular surface (including onchocerciasis, ameba) but these are rare, generally have a clear exposure history, and are usually associated with severe eye pain.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • it's true !!! its a parasite. this is not just a social fear-mongering A.K.A. urban myth.i found this information at this site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_blindnessits called: Onchocerciasis Onchocerciasis (pronounced ) or river blindness is the world's second leading infectious cause of blindness. It is caused by Onchocerca volvulus, a parasitic worm that can live for up to fifteen years in the human body. It is transmitted to people through the bite of a black fly. The worms spread throughout the body, and when they die, they cause intense itching and a strong immune system response that can destroy nearby tissue, such as the eye. The primary treatment is a drug, ivermectin. For best effect, entire villages are treated at the same time. A single dose may kill first stage larvae (microfilariae) in infected people and prevent transmission for many months in the remaining people. About 18 million people are currently infected with this parasite. Approximately 300,000 have been irreversibly blinded by it. The life cycle of O. volvulus begins when a parasitised female Black fly of the genus Simulium takes a blood meal. Saliva containing stage three O. volvulus larvae passes into the blood of the host. From here the larvae migrate to the subcutaneous tissue where they form nodules and then mature into adult worms over a period of six to twelve months. After maturation, the smaller adult males migrate from nodules to subcutaneous tissue where they mate with the larger adult females, producing between 1000 and 3000 eggs per day. The normal adult worm lifespan is up to fifteen years. The eggs mature internally to form stage one microfilariae, which are released from the female's body one at a time and remain in the subcutaneous tissue.These stage one microfilariae are taken up by black flies upon a blood meal, in which they mature over the course of one to three weeks to stage three larvae, thereby completing the life cycle. Humans are the only definitive host for O. volvulus. The normal microfilariae lifespan is 1-2 years. Adult worms remain in subcutaneous nodules, limiting access to the host's immune system. Microfilariae, in contrast, are able to induce intense inflammatory responses, especially upon their death. Dying microfilariae have been recently discovered to release Wolbachia-derived antigens, triggering innate immune responses and producing the inflammation and its associated morbidity. Wolbachia species have been found to be endosymbionts of O. volvulus adults and microfilariae and are thought to be the driving force behind most of O. volvulus morbidity. Severity of illness is directly proportional to the number of microfilariae and the power of the resultant inflammatory response.TreatmentIvermectin (150-200 µg/kg orally once or twice per year) (6) is the drug of choice for onchocerciasis. Repeated annual or semiannual doses may be required (5,7,8), because the drug kills the microfilariae but not the adult worms, which can live for many years (1). If subcutaneous nodules are present, they should be excised if their anatomic location allows that to be done safely (4). Travelers who have a diagnosis of onchocerciasis should be advised to consult with a specialist in infectious diseases or tropical medicineDrugs:•Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) only kills microfilaria •Ivermectine (150 microgram/kg single dose) only kills microfilaria •Suramin only kills macrofilaria so its true ....flys can kill your eyes!!!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • My nephew got some sort of infection around 3 years old or so, either of the eye or a sinus infection. It caused him to accumulate mucus in the corners of his eyes as well as all the mucus he was blowing out his nose. It's my understanding that your sinuses are connected to your eyes (somewhere), so having excess snot come out from being so congested isn't a far stretch.A friend I had in my childhood claimed he could make the vapor from his inhaler come out of the inner corner of his eyes. I'd say that's a stretch, but it's not impossible.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • yea there seems to be alot of rumors dealing with the eye boogers. i was told by a mary k consultant that there were bugs that live in your mascara and eat at your eyelashes while you are sleeping and that the "eye boogers" are there droppings. What i dont get is what about the men or younger kids that do not where make up. How do you explain their boogers? This sounds like someone has too much time on their hands.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • August 18, 2008
    • 02:50 PM
    • 0
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  • There actually is a parasitic worm that can live in your eye. Acanthamoeba
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 19, 2008
    • 02:20 AM
    • 0
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  • Eyes are organs that detect light. The simplest "eyes", in even unicellular organisms, do nothing but detect whether the surroundings are light or dark, which is sufficient for the entrainment of circadian rhythms and may allow the organism to seek out or avoid light. More complex optical systems with resolving power have come in ten fundamentally different "designs", and 96% of animal species possess a complex optical system.----------Mobin
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 19, 2008
    • 03:36 PM
    • 0
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  • Not necessarily.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rheum
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 24, 2008
    • 08:15 AM
    • 0
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  • I thought that too....more specifically here is what I thought...and it's true...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demodex_folliculorum
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 11:01 PM
    • 0
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  • I thought that too....more specifically here is what I thought...and it's true...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demodex_folliculorumIs this like the eye squiggly you see sometimes that they mention on Family guy too? Like, they look like microscopic squigglies and when you try to look at them they move away and when you ignore them they come back to the center??
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Its just rheum. Very natural, its a combination of things such as mucus, dust, blood cells and skin cells. Usually it gets washed away by tears when you blink but when you sleep at night it builds up, gets crusty, and usually sits in the corner of your eyes. Children get it worse than adults but it can happen to anybody at any age and its natural.As for the bugs, yes there are parasites that can live in your eye. But they do not cause the eye boogers. If you had a parasite in your eye, you would have more symptoms than just eye boogers...
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Google search Loa loa.. it's a parasitic worm that can be seen crawling across you're eye. It's very rare, but there is such thing as a "bug" that can affect the eye. Not related to eye boogers at all..
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 9, 2009
    • 00:16 AM
    • 0
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  • My question is also concerning eye boogers. Within the last week I have an excess of eye boogers. In the morning my eyes are almost matted shut from the boogers getting in my lashes. Throughout the day my eyes continue to make lots of boogers, so much that I can't even wear my contacts. My eyes are not red and they don't hurt, they do feel dry though, could this be alergies?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 14, 2009
    • 08:16 PM
    • 0
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  • Read this. I doubt its this but this is interesting. http://www.snopes.com/horrors/insects/wormeye.aspin reply to:it's true !!! its a parasite. this is not just a social fear-mongering A.K.A. urban myth.i found this information at this site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_blindnessits called: Onchocerciasis Onchocerciasis (pronounced ) or river blindness is the world's second leading infectious cause of blindness. It is caused by Onchocerca volvulus, a parasitic worm that can live for up to fifteen years in the human body. It is transmitted to people through the bite of a black fly. The worms spread throughout the body, and when they die, they cause intense itching and a strong immune system response that can destroy nearby tissue, such as the eye. The primary treatment is a drug, ivermectin. For best effect, entire villages are treated at the same time. A single dose may kill first stage larvae (microfilariae) in infected people and prevent transmission for many months in the remaining people. About 18 million people are currently infected with this parasite. Approximately 300,000 have been irreversibly blinded by it. The life cycle of O. volvulus begins when a parasitised female Black fly of the genus Simulium takes a blood meal. Saliva containing stage three O. volvulus larvae passes into the blood of the host. From here the larvae migrate to the subcutaneous tissue where they form nodules and then mature into adult worms over a period of six to twelve months. After maturation, the smaller adult males migrate from nodules to subcutaneous tissue where they mate with the larger adult females, producing between 1000 and 3000 eggs per day. The normal adult worm lifespan is up to fifteen years. The eggs mature internally to form stage one microfilariae, which are released from the female's body one at a time and remain in the subcutaneous tissue.These stage one microfilariae are taken up by black flies upon a blood meal, in which they mature over the course of one to three weeks to stage three larvae, thereby completing the life cycle. Humans are the only definitive host for O. volvulus. The normal microfilariae lifespan is 1-2 years. Adult worms remain in subcutaneous nodules, limiting access to the host's immune system. Microfilariae, in contrast, are able to induce intense inflammatory responses, especially upon their death. Dying microfilariae have been recently discovered to release Wolbachia-derived antigens, triggering innate immune responses and producing the inflammation and its associated morbidity. Wolbachia species have been found to be endosymbionts of O. volvulus adults and microfilariae and are thought to be the driving force behind most of O. volvulus morbidity. Severity of illness is directly proportional to the number of microfilariae and the power of the resultant inflammatory response.TreatmentIvermectin (150-200 µg/kg orally once or twice per year) (6) is the drug of choice for onchocerciasis. Repeated annual or semiannual doses may be required (5,7,8), because the drug kills the microfilariae but not the adult worms, which can live for many years (1). If subcutaneous nodules are present, they should be excised if their anatomic location allows that to be done safely (4). Travelers who have a diagnosis of onchocerciasis should be advised to consult with a specialist in infectious diseases or tropical medicineDrugs:•Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) only kills microfilaria •Ivermectine (150 microgram/kg single dose) only kills microfilaria •Suramin only kills macrofilaria so its true ....flys can kill your eyes!!!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 21, 2010
    • 02:31 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • yea there seems to be alot of rumors dealing with the eye boogers. i was told by a mary k consultant that there were bugs that live in your mascara and eat at your eyelashes while you are sleeping and that the "eye boogers" are there droppings. What i dont get is what about the men or younger kids that do not where make up. How do you explain their boogers? This sounds like someone has too much time on their hands.or needs to wash their hands, as most bacterial/virual or parasitic eye conditions are extremely contagious..... boys, men, etc... all from transmission...Your make up consultant wasn't so far off the mark re: mascara... check out this site, to know why: http://theopticalvisionsite.com/health/demodex-mites-and-dry-eyes/.Some brief excerpts from the link above re: Demodex Mites:"Demodex are intradermal parasites that thrive in hair follicles, meibomian and sebaceous glands. Demodex is spread through direct contact and probably by dust that contains eggs.Demodex folliculorum is the tiny parasitic mite that lives primarily in eyelash follicles and the meibomian glands. Demodex brevis mites live primarily in sebaceous glands connected to hair follicles and the glands of Zeis. These mites are now linked to some forms of rosacea. Both species are primarily found in the face, near the nose, the eyelashes and eyebrows.""In the vast majority of cases, Demodex mites go unobserved, without any adverse symptoms. However, in some people with suppressed immune systems, mite populations can dramatically increase, resulting in a condition know as demodicosis. The symptoms include ocular irritation including dry eyes, itching, scaling of lids, decreased vision and madarosis (loss of lashes).""One study of 435 people examined eyelashes from people aged 2 to 96 years. Samples of the eyelashes were removed from each subject and studied under a light microscope. Infection of Demodex was classified on the basis of presence of mature and larval forms, and after observing chitinous exuviae affixed to the subjects eyelashes.This study concluded that Demodex occures among: * 13% of subject aged 3 to 15 years * 34% of subjects aged 19 to 25 years * 69% of subjects aged 31 to 50 years * 87% of subjects aged 51 to 70 years * 95% of subjects aged 71-96 years"Really, the best thing to do, is to see a doctor... let them diagnose. Could be bacterial or viral conjunctivitis, could be parasitic, could be a few/several other eye/vision/ocular problems. "Sticky eye" is just a general symptom of several different, potential issues.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
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