Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Migraine and nasal congestion

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 10 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • July 9, 2009
  • 00:53 AM

Hello everyone, first time poster

I'm looking for a diagnosis on a particular problem I've had for a number of years, this being an unending migraine headache. I've had this migraine headache for probably around 5 years, was going to a neurologist a couple years ago to treat it, but unfortunately, my insurance ran out, and couldn't see her anymore (currently on the process of trying to get back medical coverage). However, just a while back, I noticed I also had nasty nasal congestion for around the same amount of time as my migraines, and also have this strange purple dis colorization under my eyes as well (for type of discolorization, I refer to this picture http://i28.tinypic.com/30vhxyr.jpg). I'm guessing the two are linked, from what I hear, nasal congestion can cause migraine headaches, and mine is pretty bad. Is there anything I can do about it?

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10 Replies:

  • Oh, I forgot to add, what would the diagnosis be for this, and, is there anything I can do about it?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Since it doesn't seem I can edit my posts (somebody correct me if I'm wrong on this), I'll have to add what I forgot in a reply. Another problem I have with these migraines is, they make me seriously fatigued, which makes it hard for me to work, and by unending, I mean really, this migraine is unending. I'm wondering, if this is all because of some allergy which causes my nasal congestion which in turn, causes my migraines, or is it some other problem? Hopefully someone can help.*Weird, I can edit this post, but not my former two posts....hmm*
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi. I think sinus congestion itself does not cause migraines, but it can cause pressure on some nerves that pass through to the brain, therefore causing the migraine. I take Claritin every day to make sure this problem does not cause my migraines.It is normal if you have a migraine to feel some sinus congestion.I have migraines that are very bad when I wake up, and sometimes wake me up from sleep. After 33 years of this, I was told I had high Intracranial pressure, and the medications actually seem to be working. This condition is also known as Psuedotumor Cerebri.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I've found that I get migraine from chemical scents like air freshners and perfumes.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I also suffer from this. I am pretty sure the nasal congestion triggers my migraines.What changed my life is cleaning my sinuses. At first I did it every day and now only as necessary. Learn to use a neti pot. It sounds simple, but it may help keep them clear so as to not trigger. You can also get some info at www.ent-consult.com. I use Dr. Grossan's sinus cleaners and they've worked very well.Claritin only triggered more headaches for me, but certainly try it if it helps you.Also, I use hot packs that you heat in the microwave and I put them on my head to help "melt" and drain all secretions. Sometimes this helps get rid of my headaches altogether. For this problem, I think prevention is the best cure. If none of this works, I would save my money to see a migraine specialist. A cure for your migraines is priceless.Oh, one more thing, don't take narcotics. They will cause rebound headaches and then you'll never get rid of them, but only need more narcotics. Take it from someone who knows.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Since it doesn't seem I can edit my posts (somebody correct me if I'm wrong on this), I'll have to add what I forgot in a reply. Another problem I have with these migraines is, they make me seriously fatigued, which makes it hard for me to work, and by unending, I mean really, this migraine is unending. I'm wondering, if this is all because of some allergy which causes my nasal congestion which in turn, causes my migraines, or is it some other problem? Hopefully someone can help.*Weird, I can edit this post, but not my former two posts....hmm*I have exactly the same problem as you. I have been dealing with this for about 4 years. I have been taking daily medication to prevent migraines that does not work. I have always thought that my migraines were related to sinuses but no one really listens. I do not have sinus infection symptoms. I also am so exhausted all the time. I am going to my general doctor next week and I am going to take in some articles I have found. It makes me feel better to know that someone else has the same issues and I am not crazy. I also have the issues under my eyes...I thought it was because I was so tired.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have exactly the same problem as you. I have been dealing with this for about 4 years. I have been taking daily medication to prevent migraines that does not work. I have always thought that my migraines were related to sinuses but no one really listens. I do not have sinus infection symptoms. I also am so exhausted all the time. I am going to my general doctor next week and I am going to take in some articles I have found. It makes me feel better to know that someone else has the same issues and I am not crazy. I also have the issues under my eyes...I thought it was because I was so tired.Ive been dignosed as having migraine too. It seems to me that the cause is one sided nasal congestion because that is how it starts. I then get bouts of dizziness and have difficulty getting my words out and become very fatigued. I have had to start working three days a week because I cannot manage more and struggle every day. I have just found a BBC article which may explain this syndrome. Have a look at the following, it's interesting. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4663337.stm
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 26, 2010
    • 08:21 PM
    • 0
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  • I have similar problem; start with sinus congestion only in the right side of the nose and around eye, migraine follows and doesn't go away unless I take Treximet. Just FYI sometimes the sinus comes after an episode of upper and neck pain on the right around the occipital area and if I don't take a morphine and methacarbamol immediately the sinus congestion happens but that less often then the congestion starts on its own with possible allergic reaction to the enviroment. I am going to be asking my doc for a brain and sinus mri and/or cat scan to make sure there is no tumor or anything else that shouldn't be there. Ive been dignosed as having migraine too. It seems to me that the cause is one sided nasal congestion because that is how it starts. I then get bouts of dizziness and have difficulty getting my words out and become very fatigued. I have had to start working three days a week because I cannot manage more and struggle every day. I have just found a BBC article which may explain this syndrome. Have a look at the following, it's interesting. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4663337.stm
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 16, 2011
    • 09:40 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Hello everyone, first time posterI'm looking for a diagnosis on a particular problem I've had for a number of years, this being an unending migraine headache. I've had this migraine headache for probably around 5 years, was going to a neurologist a couple years ago to treat it, but unfortunately, my insurance ran out, and couldn't see her anymore (currently on the process of trying to get back medical coverage). However, just a while back, I noticed I also had nasty nasal congestion for around the same amount of time as my migraines, and also have this strange purple dis colorization under my eyes as well (for type of discolorization, I refer to this picture http://i28.tinypic.com/30vhxyr.jpg). I'm guessing the two are linked, from what I hear, nasal congestion can cause migraine headaches, and mine is pretty bad. Is there anything I can do about it?Hi, I have chronic migraines too, although different than yours. I did just stumble upon something. I'm cutting and pasting: Chronic headaches are frequently reported. The most common symptoms of SHYMA are disturbances in gait, cognition and bladder control. Gait disturbances include a sense of clumsiness, and difficulty walking on uneven surfaces or stairs. Subtle gait abnormalities may be seen during a careful examination, but obvious gait impairment or apraxia is rare. Cognitive complaints are often described as “dullness,” decline in organizational skills and dependence on lists, and may lead to difficulty with job duties. And in fact, a great number of people with SHYMA report that their symptoms resulted in decreased job performance. Depending on the length of time it has gone untreated, cognitive decline can vary greatly. Chronic headaches that are hard to relieve with pain medications (such as aspirin or acetaminophen) are also frequently reported. Other symptoms include visual complaints and syncope (fainting). Patients’ complaints are often quite prominent, in contrast to the doctors’ clinical findings, which can be subtle—a discrepancy that may impede accurate diagnosis of SHYMA. SHYMA is Sudden onset Hydrocephalus in adults. Adults can have it without the big head, which creates more pressure on the skull. It is often not found because they don't look for it in adults- only children. Runny noses and sinus problems are a huge problem with it too. Thought it might be worth a look.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, I would HIGHLY recommend getting checked for sleep apnea. I'm not a doctor, but I do have sleep apnea and your symptoms certainly seem to match up. I have also had major problems with both nasal congestion and fatigue. In addition, migraines and darkness under the eyes are very common symptoms of sleep apnea. Untreated sleep apnea is a serious condition that can cause a large number of health problems so you definitely want to find out if that's the problem or not. Unfortunately, there is a lot of mis-information out there about sleep apnea only being a problem for obese individuals or people with large necks, which is completely untrue. Anyone from the thinnest to the most obese of individuals can have sleep apnea. What makes things worse is that many Primary Care doctors themselves don't understand sleep apnea that well so it goes very undiagnosed. There are a LOT of people walking around with undiagnosed sleep apnea. You would need to get a sleep study done to verify whether or not sleep apnea is the problem. Since many Primary Care doctors think that they know everything, sometimes they are a little hesitant to write a referral for a sleep study. If your doctor refuses to write a referral then you need to find another doctor that will. I hope this helped. Good Luck!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
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