Discussions By Condition: Back conditions

..something wrong with my spine? :S

Posted In: Back conditions 6 Replies
  • Posted By: SKiNME
  • June 10, 2009
  • 11:01 PM

http://i40.tinypic.com/110fz0k.jpg
http://i41.tinypic.com/2z3qj6c.jpg

..what are these hollow depressions? i know i have lordosis, is it related? :confused:

Reply Flag this Discussion

6 Replies:

  • From what I could tell from the pics, the area of dimples is right above and to the sides of your butt crack, on either side of the spine-- is all that correct?If the location above is correct, you have nothing to worry about. They are caused by your Posterior Superior Iliac Spine-- bony landmarks. Everyone has them. As for your lordosis (abnormal concave curvature of the lumbar spine), it is not causing the dimples, but could make them more easily seen by stretching the skin around that area taut. The lordosis, btw, can be effectively treated/corrected with either a well-qualified massage therapist or a physical therapist. The sooner you begin to heal it, the better your back will feel overall. Look up PSIS on the internet-- there are plenty of pictures.
    Harmonium 322 Replies Flag this Response
  • ..thank you for the fast reply! and for the relief too! :) ..as for lordosis, i've been suffering from lordodsis since childhood, i noticed my butt was sticking out and i always thought its gonna be fixed if i lost weight! i only knew what it is a few months back, and i also knew its probably due to musclar imbalance or stretched weak abs or tight hip flexors! since then, i've been doing yoga and some abs exercises! and "maybe" i think "maybe" its getting better! :) too bad massage therapist/physical therapist are not an option atm coz i dont have time, any other advice?
    SKiNME 12 Replies Flag this Response
  • You can do some things on your own, at home. I do believe the yoga will help you greatly. Please note that before you do any of these exercises, you should consult your physician to ensure it's safe for you to do. How bad is your lordodic curvature? Do you also have kyphosis (hunchback, convex curve of the thoracic spine)? Does it cause you pain? Are you on any medications? What is your height and weight? Sorry for all the questions, just trying to gather enough info to really help you. A lot of what's going to help is just you becoming aware of your posture. Not to be too overly-simplistic....if you find yourself standing or sitting in a lordodic position-- straighten up! It won't feel 'right' at first and may even cause some soreness, but if you do this every time you catch yourself it will make a difference over time to the point that the proper posture is now the comfortable one. If you find yourself sitting in an extreme lordosis position, pull your stomach tight (I pretend I'm putting my belly-button to my spine) and allow your spine to elongate (so that you seem taller). While you are doing all of that, tuck your tail in. What I mean is.... rotate your hips posteriorly so that your backside is more underneath you. Do all of this for as long as you can without severe discomfort (it will be uncomfortable at first, have patience!) and as often as you think about it. A great way to do these exercises is to be lying on a firm surface like your floor (not your bed or couch-firm). Again, begin by pulling your belly button to your spine, elongate both your lower and upper half and try to tuck your rump under you-- lower. You can even place one of your hands underneath your lumbar area and try to bring your spine to meet your hand-- don't force though, just go as far as your body is telling you is okay. I highly recommend strengthening all of your core muscles: all abdominal muscles (including obliques and transversus abdominis), your diaphragm, your psoas and iliacus. Further, if you were to also strengthen your erector spinae muscles in your back, along with your quadratus lomborium......it helps to have all of these muscles strong in order to keep your posture proper. First thing in the morning while still in bed, you can get on your hands and knees and arch your back like a cat. Then, from that arch, do the opposite-- make your back very lordodic. Go back and forth to stretch the back. Then when you arise from your bed, reach your hands up tall, elongating your spine and tucking your tail. Sets the day off right! To stretch your iliopsoas muscle, lay on the end of a table with your butt just barely on it and your legs hanging down. Leave on leg hanging as far as it will go without you falling off the table and pull the other knee up to your chest-- as tight as you can. Repeat using the opposite legs and do several sets of these. You can also sit on the floor with one leg as directly behind you as you can get and the other crossed in front of you, bent at the knee with the foot pointing toward the side that leg is not on (if right leg is in front, bend at the knee and point toes to the left). Now, slowly bend from your waist as far as you can go, keeping your legs where they are. Repeat on the other side (switching legs). Do several sets at least daily. You really do need to go and be seen by a well-qualified massage therapist (trained in myofascial release as well as neuromuscular techniques and trigger point therapy and especially structural alignment-- really, a certified Rolfer would be best) or a physical therapist who does not rely too heavily on mechanical manipulation-- you need hands on work to correct the curvature. It really doesn't take long to go-- and hour to an hour and a half per session. Most medium-severe cases I can resolve within 10 sessions, but it takes quite a bit of work from the client. Massage therapist are also likely to work around your schedule-- some will even come to your home. Just really, check credentials-- we don't have a uniform standard for education or licensing here in the US (if that's where you are). It's very important the person you allow to manipulate your soft tissue is well-trained!
    Harmonium 322 Replies Flag this Response
  • ..i think my lordosis is mild, and no kyphosis, no pain, no medication, im 184cm/95kg, and feel free to ask as many question as you like, i appreciate your help so much, thank you :) ..oh, and can you elaborate more on stretching the iliopsoas on the floor, i dont think im doing it right! thank you :)
    SKiNME 12 Replies Flag this Response
  • Blaze, you should take your own advice. If you can't say something nice, don't say it. SKiNME,oh, and can you elaborate more on stretching the iliopsoas on the floor, i dont think im doing it right! thank you I'll try, but it is difficult to describe without pictures! Sit on the floor with both of your legs crossed in front of you. Now, keeping your right leg where it is, move your left leg straight out behind you (as if you were doing half a split). If you are not very flexible, it will take time to master this position. So, now you have one leg behind you and one crossed in front of you, got it? Your torso should be in the sitting up position (as best you can with your leg behind you!). Now, lean your torso to the floor in front of you. If done correctly, you should feel a pull not only in your leg that's behind you, but in your lower abdomen. Now, switch legs and repeat. Does that help?
    Harmonium 322 Replies Flag this Response
  • Blaze, you should take your own advice. If you can't say something nice, don't say it. SKiNME, I'll try, but it is difficult to describe without pictures! Sit on the floor with both of your legs crossed in front of you. Now, keeping your right leg where it is, move your left leg straight out behind you (as if you were doing half a split). If you are not very flexible, it will take time to master this position. So, now you have one leg behind you and one crossed in front of you, got it? Your torso should be in the sitting up position (as best you can with your leg behind you!). Now, lean your torso to the floor in front of you. If done correctly, you should feel a pull not only in your leg that's behind you, but in your lower abdomen. Now, switch legs and repeat. Does that help? ..yes, i think i got it now, but i feel the pull in the crossed leg (in the glutes area), no pull in the leg behind or lower abdomin! :o ..thank you again :)
    SKiNME 12 Replies Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.
Advertisement

8 Health Dangers of Depression

Unmanaged depression can take a toll on your physical health.

Best Cough & Cold Meds for Kids

Help your child feel better, faster.

What HIV Positive Women Should Know About Sex

You can have sex after an HIV diagnosis.

Food Choices for Diabetes

What, when and how much you eat affects your blood sugar.

6 Exercises for Multiple Sclerosis

Ease your way into these stretching and strengthening moves,

Advertisement