Discussions By Condition: Heart conditions

rheumatic heart disease

Posted In: Heart conditions 4 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • August 25, 2006
  • 01:56 AM

This kind of heart disease, can it be treated? My girl friend says she got this disease when she was still a child, i wonder if this can be healed and wont come back anymore. would it have a pregnancy complecation i'm worried about her to be pregnant i'm worried that the disease might come back just like happen to the wife of the coworker were the disease attacked after they got kids.

Anyone could please inlighten me about this disease.


thanks

Abbyrose

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4 Replies:

  • Control your Blood Sugar, Before Your Heart Surgery. Nearly half of all heart surgery patients may experience blood sugar levels high enough to require temporary insulin treatment after their operation, even though they've never had diabetes, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Health System.And a significant minority of those patients might need to take medicines for days or even weeks after they leave the hospital, to help their blood sugar levels reach normal again, the researchers show. Obese patients, older patients, and those whose blood sugar levels were still high two days after their operation are most likely to need this kind of treatment, they find. Although the study didn't look at whether such patients later developed true diabetes or pre-diabetes, the results are striking enough to warrant a new U-M research project. It will recruit patients before their operations, and will include longer follow-up and more rigorous testing of pre-surgery and post-hospitalization blood sugar levels.On Sunday at the American Diabetes Association's Scientific Sessions in San Francisco, a U-M team presented their findings in a poster that included retrospective data from 1,362 patients who had certain heart and vascular operations at U-M in 2006 and 2007.Of them, 662 developed "stress induced hyperglycemia", or high blood sugar after surgery, and 87 needed blood sugar medicines when they left the hospital.The study was possible because UMHS has a dedicated team of physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners called the Hospital Intensive Insulin Program who look for and treat elevated blood sugar in all heart and vascular surgery patients. Led by U-M endocrinologist Roma Gianchandani, M.D., the team gives insulin and oral medicines during these patients' hospital stays, and prescribes medicines for the patients to take at home. They also recommend that such patients receive further blood-sugar testing from their primary care doctors. read more of this story from herehttp://heartscan.blogspot.com/2008/06/control-your-blood-sugar-before-your.htmlThank YOU rechaHeart Scanhttp://heartscan.blogspot.com/Heart Scan blog is for detection , prevention of heart disease and distribution about all the cardiac research carried out by specialist cardiologists all over world. This blog contains important information about intermediate risk of cardiac arrest.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hello Everyone,Here are some tips to keep your heart healthy.1) Keep MovingAs little as a half hour of exercise daily can protect your heart. Aerobic activities such as walking, running and swimming work the heart and help keep it robust. We all have busy schedules and hectic lifestyles, and fitting in a daily workout can be an overwhelming thought. However, it's important to remember that exercise doesn't have to be done all at once to be beneficial. Take a couple of short walks a day and use the stairs whenever possible. We can all fit in 10 minutes here and 15 minutes there to move our bodies if we make it a priority. Embrace the challenge and think of exercise as a gift, not a chore. And in a very real way, that's just what it is, a gift...for your heart.2) Watch Your CholesterolThe toxins in tobacco smoke lower a person's high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL or "good" cholesterol) while raising levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL or "bad" cholesterol). A high level of LDL in the blood is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis, also known as hardening of the arteries. Other factors that influence cholesterol are genetics and eating a diet rich in saturated fats and trans fats. If it’s been a year or more since your last cholesterol check, call your doctor and schedule an appointment. If your cholesterol is high, there are steps you can take to control it.3) Maintain Normal Blood PressureWhile at the doctor’s office getting your cholesterol checked, have your blood pressure checked also. Maintaining a healthy blood pressure reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure. High blood pressure is considered to be anything over 140 for systolic blood pressure and 90 for diastolic blood pressure. If yours is high, take it seriously and follow your doctor’s recommendations.
    robetjems 1 Replies
    • October 28, 2009
    • 05:04 AM
    • 0
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  • Hi im a 22 yr old woman and I had rheumatic fever when I was 9 years old. It took the hospital 6 weeks to figure out I had it, while during that time I was very very ill. I almost died. I now have 2 damaged valves (aortic and mitral). I have been on penicillin injections since I was 9 and have recently been told that I will be having them for the rest of my life! I was also told (after a heart eco) that they will not replace my valves for another 10 to 15 years as they are not seriously damaged enough. They said I cant have a baby because my heart will not be able to support me and the baby. Im very devastated.
    ashy10 5 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi im a 22 yr old woman and I had rheumatic fever when I was 9 years old. It took the hospital 6 weeks to figure out I had it, while during that time I was very very ill. I almost died. I now have 2 damaged valves (aortic and mitral). I have been on penicillin injections since I was 9 and have recently been told that I will be having them for the rest of my life! I was also told (after a heart eco) that they will not replace my valves for another 10 to 15 years as they are not seriously damaged enough. They said I cant have a baby because my heart will not be able to support me and the baby. Im very devastated.hi ashythis is edgar my wife was diagnosed with rheumatic h.d. first she felt as if there were heavy things over her chest. 2decho results says she has rhmtc heart desease. doctor told us there isnt no medcines only aspirin.im worried. based on my researched and as per doctoers advise that Qenzyme is a vitamin for heart. she's taking it for quite sometime. last year only 1 valve was damaged after 1 year, now two valves.she does a lot of exercises, uses extra virgin olive oil to make sure of her good cholesterol. she makes sure her bp and cholesterol are ok to avoid attack. do you have any good news for this kind of desease thank you very much ...worried edgar november 19, 2010
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 19, 2010
    • 07:06 AM
    • 0
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