Discussions By Condition: Cancer

Insulinoma in dogs

Posted In: Cancer 104 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • August 9, 2006
  • 05:01 PM

:(

Hello, I just lost my dog diagnosed w/ insulimona. She was a pug..7 yrs. old, starting loosing her appetite 2 wks before the dreadful day.
She had a red tumor during the process on her belly. She lost weight, appetite, very fatigued. I found her lathargic on her side when I came home from work, yellow on her eyes, belly and ears, first impression was liver failure, rushed her down to the Vet, they kept her on IV's Dextrox etc. for 4 days did a ultrasound and discovered a mass near her pancreas and offered to do surgery.
We took her home and brought her to a local vet and he stated that surgery or euthunisia was the only 2 options, and surgery was a very risky one because they have to reconstruct the duodeum and they die anyways after the surgery. It was a shock and she has been euthunized since then.

I know this is a web site for people that have insulimona but I feel that animals are very simular to humans and people need to know there is really no cure or cause. Sometimes they can be treated to keep the insulin levels up but how long can that last. WE need to find out what causes this dreadful rare disease. If anyone out there knows about this please inform me. This is obviously my first experience w/ this and I could be all wrong and ill informed.

Thank you,

Pamela :confused: :( ::(

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  • Dear Pamela,I realize your post was almost a year ago (I hope you will be able to see this). And I hope your doing well. My dog died just yesterday from the same thing as yours. My beautiful 12 year 7 month old "baby girl" Gypsy died yesteday moring. She was a very loving, affectionate and loyal dog who was always by my side for the past 12 years. I would have never asked for a better companion. It happened so fast it all is a huge blur to me. She was fine when I left for work Monday but when my 2 yr old and I retuned home she was disoriented and panting harder than I have ever scene her pant. As the evening went on she seemed a little better but not herself. She showed absolutely no emotion what so ever to me or to my son, (My husband is out of town until Friday). She had a very restless night (we both tossed and turned) until around 1am when her panting increased by 2:30 am she was having one seizure after the other 20 -30 seconds apart. I called a friend to be here with Miles while I took her to the 24hr emergency vet. Her glucose had dropped to 14, which was the reason for the seizures. They kept her to try to stabilize her and to find out what was going on. After dropping my son off at preschool today I went to consult with her regular vet. She was so attached to her she offered to consult w/ the emergency care vet where she was in the ICU. On her advise I went to go check on Gypsy rather than wait on a call. I thank god I did, she was waiting for me. The Emergency care vet then told me they made several attempts to stabilize her glucose but it never rose above 40 and wanted to discus her quality of life, the one thing I did not want to hear. Apparently it is believed that this condition is caused by a type of glucose tumor located in the panaceas. Not with in 10 minutes of leaving us alone she quietly passed away in my arms. I was so thankful I did not have to make the decision, she made it for me. I am so glad to have had the last 12 years with her. I know a dog does not live as long as we do, but we sure do make them apart of our heart, sole and family. Now I have to figure out how to tell my son Gypsy is gone. I've made the decision I will wait until my husband gets home on Friday as long as I can keep telling him she is at the doctor. Your so right we need to find out what causes Insulinoma!!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hello to all and thank you for all your information. My boston terrier Pugsley was showing signs of being lethargic, thirsty, incoherent, and although we took him to the vet several times and he was diagnosed and treated for low blood sugar, he still want into a grand mal seizure, and then many small ones until finally back to back every 15 minutes. During these weeks, he was eating, vomiting and then seizuring, and also seizuring after exercise... although his grand mal seizure was while he was asleep in the middle of the night. Pugsley has now been in the hospital for 5 days and every possible test has been run. His ultrasound today showed a spleen covered with tumors, although this is not the cause for low blood sugar. We chose the surgery since Pugsley is ony 7 years old, very healthy until now, and we were told his prognosis could be well over 1 year or more. Today they removed his spleen and 3 insulinomas from the back side of his pancreas. His sugar level immediately rose. This was at 6:00 p.m. today and as of 15 minutes ago, his sugar level is 168... meaning, his body is producing the levels on its own. Prior to the surgery, he could not survive without the IV and that's why he's been in there so long. If his levels continue in an upward mode and he does not develop pancreatitis, he stands to have a good quality of life. The surgeons were not overly optimistic at the time of the ultrasound but once they were in there, they were very happy with the outcome. There is no concrete evidence of survival rates after this type of surgery however I will post the results as we move along. So many posts have helped us understand so if there is anyone he needs any information from our experience, we will be happy to help. We're praying for our Pugsley :)
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I'll say a prayer for your Pugsley too. My yorkie Riley was diagnosed with insulinomia today (7/18/07). I am devastated. The vet doesn't think surgery is going to help -- but, maybe that is what we'll do. I'm so confused now. My Riley is only 7 years old and besides having issues with his back legs as a puppy -- he has been very healthy. This came on suddenly with panting and shaking and falling over -- it's been terrible. I'm trying to keep him on a good high carbs and protein diet and he has seemed so much better - but, I'm told that it is short term.Best wishes and happy thoughts to everyone else going thru this now -- these little guys sure find their way into our hearts!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I know of people who have switched to a raw meaty bone diet. You do need to understand which bones are eaten by a dog. Also uses K-9 immunity and k-9 transfer factor and her dog is still alive with out surgery. Our dog was diagnosed in feb with same cancer, we had to do surgery and she just passed away last night. Surgery did give her a quality of life. We chose not to do chemo or radiation as those just make things worse. Feeding your dog carbs is feeding the cancer. Insulinoma produces insulin so it can take the sugar out of the body dropping you to a low BG. Mocha got used to being low blood sugar but she also had to be put on prednisone to keep seizures from happening. When blood sugars get too low I used sugar water mixed with ensure. I was told that ensure would help keep mocha from spiking then bottoming out later. Poly MVA may be of some help too. I did not get a chance to get that. I joined the rawmeatybones group on yahoo and they were of great help. there is also a cancer group there for dogs too.To learn more about some cancers look at NewsTarget.com I think is the link. You can get a lot of information there about cancers, chemo, radiation etc. Our dog food is not made for a Carnivore. Carnivores eat meat not veggies. Occasional berries etc but not steady diet.The end for this cancer is not a great way to be. Maybe you wont have the grand maul seizures we just went through with our baby, one after another all the way to the vet hosp an hour away plus what happened before we left. I wish you good luck and hugs to Riley and you. Get educated on this so as to prolong Rileys life the best that you can and to give the best quality of life you can. You may not make the same decisions we did, but make them as your gut tells you to. Even if it goes against a regular vet. I will try to find my way back to this site to see if you at least got my message and hopefully to hear you will look into to some of this before jumping into the fire. and to be of any other help that i can be if you want any help from me.I'll say a prayer for your Pugsley too. My yorkie Riley was diagnosed with insulinomia today (7/18/07). I am devastated. The vet doesn't think surgery is going to help -- but, maybe that is what we'll do. I'm so confused now. My Riley is only 7 years old and besides having issues with his back legs as a puppy -- he has been very healthy. This came on suddenly with panting and shaking and falling over -- it's been terrible. I'm trying to keep him on a good high carbs and protein diet and he has seemed so much better - but, I'm told that it is short term.Best wishes and happy thoughts to everyone else going thru this now -- these little guys sure find their way into our hearts!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • August 31, 2007
    • 05:29 AM
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  • I know this site ie a kind of "warts and all" but it helped me yesterday when I had to have my little Scooby-doo put to rest. He had 3 massive seizures in a row and didn't know me at all in the end. I was appreciative of the post as it let me know what to expect. Thanks. Rest in peace my lovely boy love mum xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 6, 2007
    • 00:36 PM
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  • Our 12 year old Portuguese Water Dog was diagnosed with insulinoma at the end of August. It has just been 2 weeks. We decided to try medical therapy instead of surgery. He had 2 smaller surgeries for mast cell tumors over the past 3 years and I hated to put him through such an invasive surgery. From my reading, it also sounds as if the tumors usually recur, and I do not want to go through this again.His first 10 days on prednisone went pretty well, but now he is acting very lethargic and not eating well. We have a vet checkup later today for his blood sugar. He's been a wonderful pet and companion and this has been very ******n everyone in the family. Any tips on diet that he will like, I am afraid he is not eating enough to keep his blood sugar up.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 14, 2007
    • 01:26 PM
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  • Our 12 year old Portuguese Water Dog was diagnosed with insulinoma at the end of August. It has just been 2 weeks. We decided to try medical therapy instead of surgery. He had 2 smaller surgeries for mast cell tumors over the past 3 years and I hated to put him through such an invasive surgery. From my reading, it also sounds as if the tumors usually recur, and I do not want to go through this again.His first 10 days on prednisone went pretty well, but now he is acting very lethargic and not eating well. We have a vet checkup later today for his blood sugar. He's been a wonderful pet and companion and this has been very ******n everyone in the family. Any tips on diet that he will like, I am afraid he is not eating enough to keep his blood sugar up. Had the vet visit, and his blood sugar is good, so we are going to reduce the dosage of prednisone and see if that perks him up!
    blesher 2 Replies
    • September 15, 2007
    • 03:54 PM
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  • Our Airedale was diagnosed with an insulinoma at the age of 8. She was a terrific dog and as I was a nurse, I decided that surgery was the plan as she was fairly young. She did well with me doing twice daily blood sugars (on her ear) and she was ever so patient knowing that a little bit of cheese was her reward. She had the surgery on October and then just before christmas I noticed a change in her symptoms, drinking lots and peeing a great deal. So her new diagnosis was diabetes. She went on insulin twice daily. Sometimes she would have low blood sugar because she didn't always eat when hungry. So occasionally she would have a seizure. She would eat something unless very low. Our other Airedale would know when when her blood sugar dropped and would warn us. Occasionally we would have to rub corn syrup on her gums and she would recover quickly. She did well and seemed to have a good quality of life. Other than putting on weight because of the insulin, she did well. One day in April she was at the groomers and jumped off the table and hyper extended her wrist. The only solution would have been surgery. Well I had always wondered when I would know when the time was up. Well this decided it for us. We couldn't put her through another surgery. She seemed to be ready. So I held her while the vet put her down. The biggest problem was the other dog was very upset because she didn't have a job anymore being a "seizure dog" . So we very quickly got another Airedale as she was so depressed. All in all we were glad we did it this way.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 28, 2007
    • 04:55 PM
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  • It seems that Insulinoma is happening more and more in dogs now a days. I had no idea of this decease until this past Sunday when I had to take my Sophie to the emergency clinic. She had been acting a little strange in our walks. Not really wanting to walk just dragging. First I thought it was due to the hot weather we were having in Los Angeles during this summer. Then I started to notice her reluctance to go for our long walks even in cooler weather. Dragging and me pulling the leash to make her walk. I thought because of her Arthritis and her age, she is 10, she was getting slower. This past Sunday was pretty bad. We started to go for our long walk. About 5 long blocks from our place she refused to walk anymore. She seemed wobbly, shaky, disoriented. I got scared and sat down with her on the grass then she started yelping and going in circles like a wounded animal. I though something had bit her on the grass, pulled her up and moved her to the side walk. Same thing. I pulled her up again and we stated to walk again just a few more paces. She over 50 pounds. I tried carrying her only to make half a block. Finally somebody saw us and offered help. They took us home in their car.After a battery of tests and three days in the hospital, Insulinoma was the diagnosis. I have her home now. She is eating small frequent meals and on prednisone. She seems to be doing well for now. Surgery was recommended. Financially impossible.
    Amylogamy 29 Replies
    • November 10, 2007
    • 09:18 AM
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  • Part 2 of previous post.I am totally devastated an feeling guilty for not been able to afford the surgery. Surgery stimate is about $5000 plus the hospital stay. I have already spent close to $4000 in the last few days. Even if I could borrow the money, there are no warranties. The survival rate with surgery is 6 months to a year if you are lucky. She has had a few surgeries during her life time and I hate to put it through another one. I just hope I can give her the best quality of life for as long as her body lets me and pray for the best. I just read in one of my Dog magazines that this couple have a dog that has had low blood sugar due to an Insulinoma for 4 years and he is still with them. No surgery. He is twelve. Maybe I would be just as lucky.
    Amylogamy 29 Replies
    • November 10, 2007
    • 09:34 AM
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  • :(Amy,I am very sorry to hear about your dog. Sadly, the medical management did not work very long at all for our portuguese water dog. We chose to put him to sleep when he was not eating or drinking and his blood tests showed bad liver and kidney function. Even though the decision was wrenching for all of our family, I do not regret that we did not do the surgery. It is very invasive, a hard recuperation and very expensive. Since the cancer has almost always metastized the cancer usually returns.Best wishes for your doggie. Enjoy the time you still have with him. Just remember that you want them to have the best quality of life possible. Our dog was very sweet, and even the vet said he seemed depressed when he was so sick.Barbara
    blesher 2 Replies
    • November 10, 2007
    • 02:54 PM
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  • Gosh, I can't believe how many people are affected by this disease. My dog got diagnosed with insulinoma about a month and a half ago. The signs were all the same as everyone elses dogs;slower on walks,eating a lot and then she was weak and having seizures. Her glucose was very low at about 16. We did get it up to 30-40 with IV fluids and steriods.I elected to do surgery. THe cancer was in her pancreas, along with her liver and lymph nodes. Not a good prognosis. The surgeon tried to get as much out as he could so hopefully she lives a little longer than the prognosis given. Unfoourtantley the surgery didn't raise her glucose but she has been fine with frequent meals throughtout the day and prednisone. I am very sorry to hear about everyones dogs. I just am taking it day by day and spending time with her.:(Amy,I am very sorry to hear about your dog. Sadly, the medical management did not work very long at all for our portuguese water dog. We chose to put him to sleep when he was not eating or drinking and his blood tests showed bad liver and kidney function. Even though the decision was wrenching for all of our family, I do not regret that we did not do the surgery. It is very invasive, a hard recuperation and very expensive. Since the cancer has almost always metastized the cancer usually returns.Best wishes for your doggie. Enjoy the time you still have with him. Just remember that you want them to have the best quality of life possible. Our dog was very sweet, and even the vet said he seemed depressed when he was so sick.Barbara
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 16, 2007
    • 04:19 AM
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  • This message is for anyone who needs advice. I was reading the messages on this website about a week ago. Our 10 year old labrador retriever, Jazz, was diagnosed with Insulinoma about two weeks ago. A few days after the diagnosis, we decided to have surgery. They did chest x-rays and ultra sound on liver and everything looked good, so we decided to go ahead with the surgery, hoping for the 1 year good quality life. We asked the doctor, who was at a teaching hospital, to please put down our dog if she saw that it had spread once she got into surgery, spread to the liver, etc. Well, she got the tumor out of the pancreas, and lymph nodes, and took biopsies of the liver. The doctor said she saw small specs on the liver, but said she couldn't tell if it was normal aging or cancer, which is unbelievable to us. We feel sure that she knew it was cancer. She didn't respect our wishes, and did not put our dog to sleep. We brought our dog home after the surgery, she stayed one night in the hospital, she was happy to be home, had a lot more energy, but it only lasted a few days at most and then she started slowing down again. We believe now that she had that energy at first because she was on the glucose drip. Each day she slowed down more and more, and we couldn't put her through it any longer. We had her glucose tested yesterday, and to our disappointment it was only 40. Before surgery it had been 55. And the biopsy for the liver did come back positive. We tried predinisone starting yesterday, and were told it would help right away, but it didn't. We could have kept trying more and more meds, but it wasn't what was right for our dog. We are feeling angry that the doctor did not respect our wishes to put her down during the surgery if she saw that it spread, and today we made the decision to put her down, only one week after surgery. It's incredibly painful for our family. Jazz was the most wonderful dog, not a mean bone in her body.....we put her through the surgery and feel badly about that, but don't blame ourselves because we were trying to do what was best for our dog. Our advice would be to not put your dog through surgery. The chances are not good either way, and it's terrible to see your pet go through an invasive surgery like that, have to try to recover, and then not make it. Just be strong and spend time with your pet, but don't put it through the surgery. In loving memory of Jazz 1997-2007
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 22, 2007
    • 03:03 AM
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  • Hi, I am very sorry about your dog Jazz. I am the the one that posted earlier about my dog Sophie. After careful thinking, reading and researching about it, I decided not to have surgery on my dog. It was also financially impossible. So far Sophie is doing great just with 1/2 5gm Prednisone twice a day. One week after being out of the hospital her blood sugar had gone up to 130. the following week it was 118. Both well within the range of the blood surgar level. I am mixing her regular food for older dogs with Puppy food because the Vet said to keep her on a higher protein diet. She was supposed to be fed every few hours to keep the sugar levels but she only eats about three meals a day. That is her routine. She is happy. We are going for long walks again. I carry treats just in case. She is playing. She is very much back to her normal self. I am extremely happy that I decided not to do the surgery. I think she would have died also. I don't think there is enough information about dogs that survive without surgery and for how long.
    Amylogamy 29 Replies
    • December 2, 2007
    • 03:56 AM
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  • Hi there! Glad to hear your dog Sophie is doing well with medical management. Hopefully things will go well for a long time for you and your dog. This is such a horrible disease, one we never would have imagined our dog getting. Our dog Jazz was 10, but she was so young acting, no ailments, she didn't seem old at all, so it was a shock for this to have happened, and agony for us to put her to sleep. She just didn't seem to feel better after surgery, which we hoped would help her once they got the tumor out, but there must have been more that they didn't get, because the glucose just didn't go up, if anything, it got worse. When we first discovered a problem her glucose was 55, and after surgery is was 40. We did 3 doses of prednisone, and were told it would help immediately, and it didn't, so that's when we decided to put her to sleep. We didn't want her to start having seizures and go into a coma, so we wanted to do something before that happened, and she was just so tired, she couldn't go very far outside and on the last day she was alive she couldn't even play in the snow, which she loved, being a labrador. So, we knew it was time, and don't regret our decisions, but we wouldn't do surgery if we had it to do again, we would try the medical treatment and it looks like we would have had to increase the prednisone, and maybe it was just too late for anything to work. Please update this site about Sophie, I really want to know how she is doing and how long these treatments work for her. We wish the best for you and Sophie. :)
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 2, 2007
    • 11:31 PM
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  • Hi JGZM,Thanks for the response. Again I am really sorry about Jazz. I lost 5 pounds in a week just thiniking that I would loose my Sophie. She is also 10 and had her since she was a baby. When She had her episode her blood sugar was 30 and they could not bring it up for three days. On the fourth day it got up to 60 and they let me take her home. I had already decided not to do the surgery. So far the Prednisone is working. One of the things that made me take a change was reading in "My Dog" journal magazine from November 2007 about a 12 year old dog that had survived so far on Prednisone every other day for two years.I just want to make sure that people, PLEASE DON'T RUSH! to do the surgery unless you think it is absolutedly necessary. Sophie's tumor did not show up in the x-ray or ultrasound. The only way of telling was by the insulin panel test. Again, I don't think there is enough information about the survival rate of dogs without surgery. I would keep you posted. Amy
    Amylogamy 29 Replies
    • December 4, 2007
    • 04:35 AM
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  • Hi again Amy,It's so good to hear other people's stories...It's so unreal to me that I read these posts a couple days after our dog was diagnosed with insulinoma, and now she's gone. It's just still so unbelievable. This past summer, our dog Jazz had slowed up considerably on her walks. She just didn't want to go far, but we had no idea what was going on, just thought it was that she was slowing down. Then one morning when my husband took her out, she started collapsing, couldn't stand, eventually he got her home, they weren't too far from home. Then a day went by and she seemed okay, nothing happened again. Then one evening when my husband came home from work, Jazz got all excited, which she always did, and she started collapsing again, this was the first time I saw it for myself. She couldn't stand up. She also appeared to go blind, as we called her name and she looked around, but she wasn't look AT us, just looking. My husband rushed her to the vet, and they tested the blood sugar and it was 55. The vet acted like it was no big deal and just said to give her Karo syrup...etc....we didn't like that at all. We knew something was wrong. So the next day my husband phoned the other vet, which was our regular vet, and she said we should test her glucose when she is fasting and test her insulin level, that she may have a tumor. I just was thinking that she would be diabetic or something. Anyway, when they tested everything, the insulin was super high and of course the glucose was low, so that was our diagnosis. We took her 2 days later to a Veterinary Teaching School. The doctor said they have good results with surgery, extending the dog's life up to a year. We did ultrasounds and they did notice elarged lymph nodes, but couldn't see anything in the pancreas, spleen or liver, and nothing on chest x-rays. So, we decided to go on with the surgery. We told the doctor though that if it had spread to the liver, to please put her to sleep during the surgery, as we knew that she wouldn't survive as long if it had spread that far and we didn't want Jazz to have to recover from surgery for 2 months and only have a couple more months. Anyway, after surgery, the doctor tells us there were some nodules on the liver...we were disappointed that she didn't do as we requested, but the doctor said she looks so good and is doing so well, etc., so we took her home before getting the results, and she did look good and she was so happy to come home. She was pretty energetic, which we are sure was from the glucose they were giving her through surgery and after. Anyway, that only last about 2 days and then her tiredness started coming back. A week after surgery we took her to the vet to have the glucose re-checked and it was 40, our vet gave her prednisone right away, which I explained in the last message. But after 3 doses, it wasn't helping. She was still too tired and couldn't walk very far. We just got our copies of the surgery notes, and one thing the doctor noted was that there were "multiple yellow-white nodules" on the liver. And we specifically aksed the doctor to put her to sleep if it has spread. The doctor's reply was, "well there were just a few spots on the liver and I couldn't be sure that they were just normal aging." Well, we don't believe that and are just so upset and were just so crushed when we knew that it had spread. I was just crying and yelling, how could the doctor do that to her.....I know exactly how you feel. We have all lost weight in our house. We really weren't able to eat through the whole ordeal...It was sheer agony. It's so nice to be able to talk to someone else going through the same thing. I really do wish the best for you and Sophie and hope the medicine keeps working for her for a long time. I was hoping we'd be one of the lucky ones, but it wasn't meant to be for some reason. We just got our dog's cremains last night. And are happy to have her home again. If you need any support through this, just write! Take Care! Julie:)
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 5, 2007
    • 04:56 AM
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  • Hi Julie,Sophie is a little slow today and of course, I am concerned. I know there are going to be up and down days. Because she is 10, I also thought she was slowing down. She has had arthritis for a while in her back legs due to an earlier knee surgery. Like Jazz, she did not want to walk anymore and she almost colapsed in our walk. This was the last thing on earth I thought would be wrong with her. It was truly a shock.One of the reason I opted out of the surgery was her age. I thought that either way she might last 6 months to a year. I could not see myself putting her through another surgery. She has had a few, none of them for cancer. I am just living day to day and hoping that I can have her for as long as I can.I think that the doctors were trying to do the best by not putting Jazz to sleep and trying the medication after the surgery. With these tumors it is really hard to tell how they are going to react. I am glad part of her is with you again.Thanks again for offering to help just in case. I would keep you posted.Amy
    Amylogamy 29 Replies
    • December 6, 2007
    • 05:30 AM
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  • Hi Amy, Hoping Sophie will feel better tomorrow! Yes, I'm sure there will be up and down days which will cause worry. With Jazz, she just seemed so tired, sleepy, and she was drinking a ton, and she also was breathing very hard, not always, but a lot of times. We were feeding her five times a day when we found out about the cancer and even after surgery we were feeding her five times a day. I totally understand opting out of surgery. We went back and forth about it. We were all torn up. Two of us wanted it and two of us didn't. But we went ahead. But we had those same feelings that she will have to recover from the surgery and that will take time and if it spread then she will have even less time, that's why we said to put her to sleep if it had spread because we knew she wouldn't have time to fully recover before the cancer would take over. Jazz didn't have any ailments even though she was 10. She seemed so young. She didn't lose her hearing or eye sight, she never had arthritis, she was very lucky. She did have surgery on her knee years ago, she tore something, but other than that, she was so young, it was just so unbelievable and unfair. I have attached a link for you to look at a couple photos. One is just of Jazz and the other one is of Jazz and our other dog Ginger. Jazz is the yellow lab! We'll keep Sophie in our thoughts and hope to hear from you soon. Take care! Julie http://i154.photobucket.com/albums/s266/cuddleybabysim/Photo0036Jazz.jpghttp://i154.photobucket.com/albums/s266/cuddleybabysim/D.jpg
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 6, 2007
    • 05:46 AM
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  • Hi Julie, Thanks so much for the pictures. I saved them in my computer. It is just sad to think that Jazz is not here anymore but I am sure she would always be with you in spirit.Sophie is doing better today. She had a stomach upset for fives days from something she must of eaten when we were walking. Even though I had been communicating with the Vet, I decided to take her in today. She has a viral infection and is on medication now. I was really afraid that she would get dehydrated and her blood sugar level would go down again. I am going to try to send you her picture. I tried before and could not do it. It says that the file is bigger than the forum would allow. I don't know how to make it smaller. SorryTake care and if you neeed to talk some more fell free to write me also.Amy
    Amylogamy 29 Replies
    • December 7, 2007
    • 06:21 AM
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