Discussions By Condition: Allergies

Intense itching, no rash, bumps

Posted In: Allergies 10 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • January 18, 2011
  • 05:20 AM

Its been 5 months now and I have been itching like crazy. It happens whenever I get hot/ nervous. I have looked up all sicknesses or just about anything that an cause it and nothing seems to be it. I have tried all pills and creams I have been told to try and all have failed. Going out in the cold helped but it doesn't anymore. it gets so bad that I cry and cry. It's so bad. It's coming to a point where I am starting to go crazy and I shut my self in. :/ PLEASE HELP!

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  • I have a similar thing, my dad also had it, i've had it for almost 2 years and every time i visit the doctor i get handed a new antihistamine (none of which work, not even one that was meant to work for hours).All i can advise you to do is keep calm, don't let it control you or it gets worse, just relax and accept the pain, it will pass. That's all i can do until a doctor finally tries something new, i even got blood tests and it came out clear, i want help but everyone i ask presumes its not that bad but it really hurts :S and i find it hard to exercise (i have to go ridiculously slow)When do you get it? so we can work out if its the same thing, for me it's mostly when i'm too warm and nice cold air helps me but also if something shocks me or i'm embarrassed, i thought then maybe its to do with sweating or heart rate.Changing washing detergent doesn't make sense as we already have a sensitive one for my younger siblings. I had it really bad today however i managed to detatch myself from the pain and simply observe it, feeling as it hurt my neck, then my chest, then my arms and back to neck and so on (more random than that usually)If it's what i have i know exactly how you feel, just try to detatch yourself from it and hopefully someone here will have an answerps. perhaps it's something to do with nerve endings?
    Chris_Z 3 Replies
    • February 17, 2011
    • 07:58 PM
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  • Oh my gosh I have the exact same thing. When ever I get nervous or my body heats up from working out, I get a pins and needle feeling throughout my back and legs then it becomes an itchy feeling. I do not know what is wrong. I neither get any red marks other than my scratching, but 1 time I was working out and tried to push through the pain, when I was at the locker room I saw some patches of red spots on my back, but I assume it was just because my body was heating up. If any of you two figure this out please help. I just went to a family physician and I don't know if the drugs he prescribed will help, but I will keep you two updated after a few days of taking the meds. Wish me luck.-Danny
    12danny21 4 Replies
    • February 20, 2011
    • 00:45 AM
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  • I've had it for a while now and I have good and bad news. Good news is i think i finally found it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholinergic_urticaria it's something like this i think, perhaps not exactly but i'm pretty sure thats it and the bad news? apparently it can last up to 7 years (although wikipedia says 1-30 years), i've done around 2-3 so far -.- antihistamines are supposed to help but i find them useless."Cholinergic urticaria can be very difficult to treat. Most treatment plans for cholinergic urticaria involve being aware of one's triggers, but this can be difficult since there is often comorbidity with other forms of urticaria and some urticaria is idiopathic.Often it is handled just with limiting one's exposure to triggers such as strenuous exercise or heat. For some, the reaction can be limited by making sure to wear light breathable clothing allowing the body to remain cool. Also, gradually warming the body with light exercise first can help limit the effects in some people. Since an attack can often be felt coming on, it can sometimes be halted by rapid cooling, such as applying cold water or an ice pack to the skin. This treatment can also result in an adverse reaction, depending on the sensitivity of the person affected. Sudden temperature change is a known trigger for cholinergic urticaria. Exercising consistently to break a sweat before the onset of cold weather and throughout the winter significantly reduces the symptoms in some cases.""Drug treatment is typically in the form of non-sedating antihistamines such as Loratadine, Desloratadine, Cetirizine, Levocetirizine and Fexofenadine. These drugs are H1-receptor antagonists, and when taken prophylactically on a regular basis will mask the symptoms of Cholinergic Urticaria in the majority of patients. In some recalcitrant cases, doctors advise increasing the dose above manufacturer guidelines. Should non-sedating therapy not prove successful, the sedating antihistamine drug Hydroxyzine is often trialled, however it may not be well tolerated due to the main side effect of drowsiness.For some people, H2-receptor antagonists such as Cimetidine and Ranitidine can also help control symptoms either protectively or by lessening symptoms when an attack occurs. When taken in combination with an H1 antagonist it has been shown to have a synergistic effect which is more effective than either treatment alone. The use of ranitidine (or other H2 antagonist) for urticaria is considered an off-label use, since these drugs are primarily used for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).Tricyclic antidepressants such as Doxepin, also are often potent H1 and H2 antagonists and may have a role in therapy, although side effects limit their use.Anabolic Steroids such as Danazol have in some cases proven effective in treating Cholinergic Urticaria - it is thought that this is due to the drug's beneficial effect on protease inhibitors such as alpha 1-antichymotrypsin.The anti-IgE monoclonal antibody Omalizumab has been seen in some cases to cause symptom reduction or resolution, research into this drug's efficacy and method of action on urticarial conditions is ongoing.There are some reports that anticholinergic agents such as Butylscopolamine are effective in treating the disorder.None of these treatments are surefire means of controlling attacks. Some people prove to be treatment resistant, and medications can suddenly cease being as effective as they once were. In these instances, changes to a treatment plan can sometimes help. It can be difficult to determine appropriate medications since some require a day or two to build up to effective levels, and since the condition is intermittent and outbreaks typically clear up without any treatment."Best of luck.. if i find any solutions i'll let you know, until then i'm going to check up here every now and then
    Chris_Z 3 Replies
    • February 20, 2011
    • 11:18 AM
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  • Hmm.. tried to post but it doesn't seem to have worked, shorter version, have a look into Cholinergic urticaria
    Chris_Z 3 Replies
    • February 20, 2011
    • 11:25 AM
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  • Thank you so much, i think i have Cholinergic urticaria after looking it up in wikipedia. Thanks for the information, this really gives me sanity after looking for a while of what I have.-Danny
    12danny21 4 Replies
    • February 28, 2011
    • 08:08 PM
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  • Hey Chris, I forgot to ask you is there a specific kind of test to prove I have the hives? Thanks-Danny
    12danny21 4 Replies Flag this Response
  • hi,i'm new here,so much need to learn
    gluttInfurf 15 Replies Flag this Response
  • hi,i'm new here,so much need to learn
    gluttInfurf 15 Replies Flag this Response
  • Welcome to this thread. Well before you came along, the three of us didn't know what it was and how to deal with it. Ever since Chris gave us the name of the problem I was able to look up some information and go to my doctor to get it checked out. Though she didn't say much except her husband has the exact same thing and she recommends me taking a drug with loratadine (aka active ingredient in claritin) because it is not that strong. If the hives start to resist the claritin then go back to her for a strong medication. With the generic claritin, she told me to take it once a day since its active for 24 hours and she recommends me to exercise and force a reaction. The reason why she told me that is to desensitize the nerve ends that is causing the prickly/itchy feeling. but she told me to take the med before doing that. So after a few months of forcing a reaction, she told me the pain/itching should not be as bad because our body should get used to it by then, but still take a daily claritin to help the itching. She also prescribed me benadryl in case the itching is really bad at night in terms of taking a hot shower because the itching happens as well when I take hot showers. She told me to take benadryl at night because it makes you super drowsy. So that's all i know at the moment. I'll update this thread after a week or two with my meds and exercising. Take care people, stay cool.-Danny
    12danny21 4 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have had this problem for about three weeks and good to know its not only me.I was beginning to think it was in my head.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
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