Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Racing heart, body goes numb

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 5 Replies
  • Posted By: iRizzen
  • February 13, 2010
  • 11:41 PM

I don't have health insurance anymore, so before I start visiting all the doctors, I am hoping that somebody on this Forum can help me diagnose my problem, or at least point me the right direction.

Anyway.

This has happened now about 4-5 times, most recent "sickness" happened last night . I am not taking any medications, or any illegal drugs.

This is what happens:

Out of the blue, I notice my heart beat speeding up, to the point where it feels like my heart is about to explode. Then starting from my mouth, and ending in the whole body, everything goes numb. I cant feel my toes, my feet, my tongue, or anything. I also cant tell if I am breathing in or out.

It really freaks my out, and of course that makes my mind go nuts, especially not knowing what is going on with me. I tried pinching myself, which I COULD feel. And yesterday, I had few sudden sharp pains in my neck or head area, couldn't really tell.

Anyway... thats basically it... racing heart, and complete numbness of my body.



If anyone got a clue whats going on with me ... I will be grateful for any response.

Thanks,
Rizzen

Reply Flag this Discussion

5 Replies:

  • The first thing that comes to mind is a heart arrhythmia. Heart rhythm problems (heart arrhythmias) occur when the electrical impulses in your heart that coordinate your heartbeats don't function properly, causing your heart to beat too fast, too slow or irregularly. Numbess is not associated with a heart arrhythmia, but chest pain and shortness of breath is. Are you experiencing these symptoms? My second guess would be hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) is a condition in which your thyroid gland produces too much of the hormone thyroxine. Hyperthyroidism can significantly accelerate your body's metabolism, causing sudden weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, sweating, and nervousness or irritability. Are you noticing any weight loss? Panic attacks can be caused by hyperthyroidism. Many times numbess is associated with panic attacks. The body pretty much overloads and the brain shuts down feeling to the mouth, hands, feet, body, etc. Which brings me to my next guess. This does have the signs of being a panic attack. A panic attack is a sudden episode of intense fear that develops for no apparent reason and that triggers severe physical reactions. Panic attacks can be very frightening. When panic attacks occur, you might think you're losing control, having a heart attack or even dying. Do you sweat and tremble when you have these episodes? I also suggest possible tachycardia. Tachycardia is a faster than normal heart rate. A healthy adult heart beats 60 to 100 times a minute when a person is at rest. If you have tachycardia (tak-ih-KAHR-de-uh), the rate in the upper chambers or lower chambers of the heart, or both, are increased significantly. Do you feel dizzy or short of breath with you have these sick feelings? I doubt this is what you have, but cervical spondylosis is worth looking at if you are not positive for any of the other conditions. Cervical spondylosis is a general term for age-related wear and tear affecting the joints in your neck. Also known as cervical osteoarthritis, this condition usually appears in men and women older than 40 and progresses with age. Although cervical spondylosis affects both sexes equally, men usually develop it at an earlier age than women do. You said your neck gets painful, so this does fit. Do you feel shoulder, arm or chest pain during these attacks? The only thing that doesn't fit is the rapid heart beat. Peripheral neuropathy is a stretch, but I wouldn't rule it out completely. Peripheral neuropathy often causes numbness and pain in your hands and feet. People typically describe the pain of peripheral neuropathy as tingling or burning, while they may compare the loss of sensation to the feeling of wearing a thin stocking or glove. When you have these attacks can you feel any heat, pain or touch at all? Do you have problems using your muscles? My last, and most unlikely guess would be brachial plexus injury. A brachial plexus injury is an injury to the network of nerves that sends signals from your spine to your shoulder, arm and hand. A brachial plexus injury occurs when these nerves are stretched or, in the most serious cases, torn. This usually happens when your shoulder is pressed down forcefully while your head is pushed up and away from that shoulder. Do you feel an electrical shock or burning sensation in your arms? The numbess and weakness fits, but the racing heart does not. It would be best to see a physician and mention these conditions to him or her. A free clinic is always a possibility for those that do not have health insurance. Until then, avoid coffee, tea, soda, and alcohol. When you feel your heart begin to race, stimulate your heart's vagal nerves by pinching and blowing your nose, coughing and gagging, or plunging your face in a bowl of ice water for several seconds. This should slow your heart rate down, and if the problem is heart related, stop or slow the numbness in your body. If this is caused by a panic attack, stimulating the vagal nerves may or may not help.
    aleasha89 34 Replies
    • February 14, 2010
    • 05:37 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • The first thing that comes to mind is a heart arrhythmia. Heart rhythm problems (heart arrhythmias) occur when the electrical impulses in your heart that coordinate your heartbeats don't function properly, causing your heart to beat too fast, too slow or irregularly. Numbess is not associated with a heart arrhythmia, but chest pain and shortness of breath is. Are you experiencing these symptoms? My second guess would be hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) is a condition in which your thyroid gland produces too much of the hormone thyroxine. Hyperthyroidism can significantly accelerate your body's metabolism, causing sudden weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, sweating, and nervousness or irritability. Are you noticing any weight loss? Panic attacks can be caused by hyperthyroidism. Many times numbess is associated with panic attacks. The body pretty much overloads and the brain shuts down feeling to the mouth, hands, feet, body, etc. Which brings me to my next guess. This does have the signs of being a panic attack. A panic attack is a sudden episode of intense fear that develops for no apparent reason and that triggers severe physical reactions. Panic attacks can be very frightening. When panic attacks occur, you might think you're losing control, having a heart attack or even dying. Do you sweat and tremble when you have these episodes? I also suggest possible tachycardia. Tachycardia is a faster than normal heart rate. A healthy adult heart beats 60 to 100 times a minute when a person is at rest. If you have tachycardia (tak-ih-KAHR-de-uh), the rate in the upper chambers or lower chambers of the heart, or both, are increased significantly. Do you feel dizzy or short of breath with you have these sick feelings? I doubt this is what you have, but cervical spondylosis is worth looking at if you are not positive for any of the other conditions. Cervical spondylosis is a general term for age-related wear and tear affecting the joints in your neck. Also known as cervical osteoarthritis, this condition usually appears in men and women older than 40 and progresses with age. Although cervical spondylosis affects both sexes equally, men usually develop it at an earlier age than women do. You said your neck gets painful, so this does fit. Do you feel shoulder, arm or chest pain during these attacks? The only thing that doesn't fit is the rapid heart beat. Peripheral neuropathy is a stretch, but I wouldn't rule it out completely. Peripheral neuropathy often causes numbness and pain in your hands and feet. People typically describe the pain of peripheral neuropathy as tingling or burning, while they may compare the loss of sensation to the feeling of wearing a thin stocking or glove. When you have these attacks can you feel any heat, pain or touch at all? Do you have problems using your muscles? My last, and most unlikely guess would be brachial plexus injury. A brachial plexus injury is an injury to the network of nerves that sends signals from your spine to your shoulder, arm and hand. A brachial plexus injury occurs when these nerves are stretched or, in the most serious cases, torn. This usually happens when your shoulder is pressed down forcefully while your head is pushed up and away from that shoulder. Do you feel an electrical shock or burning sensation in your arms? The numbess and weakness fits, but the racing heart does not. It would be best to see a physician and mention these conditions to him or her. A free clinic is always a possibility for those that do not have health insurance. Until then, avoid coffee, tea, soda, and alcohol. When you feel your heart begin to race, stimulate your heart's vagal nerves by pinching and blowing your nose, coughing and gagging, or plunging your face in a bowl of ice water for several seconds. This should slow your heart rate down, and if the problem is heart related, stop or slow the numbness in your body. If this is caused by a panic attack, stimulating the vagal nerves may or may not help.No, I haven't lost any weight. I really think it was an panic attack. Because in my mind i was like "omg im having heart attack, everyone is staring at me and laughing". I tried blowing my nose and plunging my face, none worked. Lately it has been lasting over an hour.No shoulder or any other sudden pain except for neck/head area. Really couldnt tell because I couldnt "feel" anything.
    iRizzen 1 Replies
    • February 14, 2010
    • 10:16 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • If stimulating the vagal nerves didn't work, this is more than likely a psychological problem; a panic attack. I've witnessed many panic attacks in my time, and if severe enough, will cause numbness, even collapse. If these episodes are reoccuring, this is most likely panic disorder, a real and treatable illness. Panic disorder is often genetic, can be brought on my long periods of extreme stress, or are just caused by the way the brain functions improperly.
    aleasha89 34 Replies
    • February 15, 2010
    • 03:27 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I have the same problems she has and my doctor told me it called agoraphobia and im still try to figure out how to fix it and make myself better
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi everyone,I just had the racing heart and got awoken by it. I am scared. I do have hyperthyroid but I have never experience waking up over a fast heart beat. After 5 minutes i calmed myself down and experience numbness on my left arm and a little chest discomfort. Still was unable to sleep as I was still feeling scared and looking for answers through the net. While reading your thread here i tried coughing then i felt a little sharp pain on my left chest...but it went a way after a while.I hate this, I am constantly worrying that I am going to have a heart attack and no one could save me. I saw with my own eyes how my late husband died due to heart attack. Can someone please help me?Thank youLinda G
    goh.linda 1 Replies
    • February 28, 2013
    • 06:30 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
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