Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Tingly hands from eating chicken.

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 12 Replies
  • Posted By: ksjlsj
  • January 27, 2010
  • 02:52 AM

I'm hoping somebody might be able to help. For the past couple of years whenever I eat white meat (chicken or turkey) I get a tingly sensation in my hands. It is not painfull just alittle annoying. Would this be a normal reaction to an allergy. I eat most meats: red, white and fish and only have this reaction to chicken and turkey: I do suffer from low blood pressure but not any extreme.

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12 Replies:

  • I'm hoping somebody might be able to help. For the past couple of years whenever I eat white meat (chicken or turkey) I get a tingly sensation in my hands. It is not painfull just alittle annoying. Would this be a normal reaction to an allergy. I eat most meats: red, white and fish and only have this reaction to chicken and turkey: I do suffer from low blood pressure but not any extreme.If this is only when you eat chicken and turkey then you might be allergic to poultry. You should go to a clinic and do a test for this. Maybe you need to stop to eat chicken and turkey.
    Clear-sky 76 Replies
    • January 27, 2010
    • 01:34 PM
    • 0
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  • I'm hoping somebody might be able to help. For the past couple of years whenever I eat white meat (chicken or turkey) I get a tingly sensation in my hands. It is not painfull just alittle annoying. Would this be a normal reaction to an allergy. I eat most meats: red, white and fish and only have this reaction to chicken and turkey: I do suffer from low blood pressure but not any extreme.I have recently noticed the same reaction, although mine happens when I eat chicken only. I am 28 y.o. and just had a baby 6 months ago, I am not allergic to anything that I am aware of. I have just recently, over the last 2 months noticed the tingling. At first I thought it was from BBQ sauce so I stopped using it, but the sensation still occured. Yesterday I ate a rotisserie chicken and had no tingling. Today I ate the left over chicken in a salad and experienced the tingling! So confused!! If you find anything out please post!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 14, 2010
    • 05:06 PM
    • 0
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  • I'm hoping somebody might be able to help. For the past couple of years whenever I eat white meat (chicken or turkey) I get a tingly sensation in my hands. It is not painfull just alittle annoying. Would this be a normal reaction to an allergy. I eat most meats: red, white and fish and only have this reaction to chicken and turkey: I do suffer from low blood pressure but not any extreme.I have had similar tingling within 15 to 30 minutes after eating chicken. I was afraid to mention it to anyone because it sounds so strange. What could this be?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 9, 2011
    • 08:11 PM
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  • I also have the exact same sensation when I eat chicken but not every time - It happens with organic chicken too. It seems to always happen when the meat is grilled but not always when it is roasted whole. I also sometimes get the same tingly sensation from salmon.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 27, 2011
    • 05:56 AM
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  • I also tingle when I eat white meat poultry, i'm 34
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi all - My sister and I both get tingling sensation (paraesthesia) when we eat poultry. In fact, I have been tracking mine for over 6 months now and have found that it happens to me when I have chicken broth, some fish, some pork, and poultry. We are both in our mid 30s, female, and have had children. We have been doing some online research and wonder if it might be beta-alanine sensitivity. Basically, from what we have seen online, beta-alanine is a naturally occurring amino acid which is created when you digest poultry, fish, and pork. From what we can tell, it isn't dangerous or anything like an allergy, but we are still researching it. It definitely is annoying. I get my tingling (pins and needles) sensation in my upper torso, neck, face, scalp, hands, arms and shoulders. Rarely do I get it in my legs (although sometimes I do). It normally dissipates after 15-20 minutes, but once I had it for over 2 hours (pretty severely). It does almost "hurt" and is very distracting. The hard part is it isn't consistent. I always get it after eating chicken at home, but almost never get it from eating chicken in a restaurant. I don't know if it has to do with quantity or not. My doctor had never heard of this condition....Anyone else confirm this theory?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • We have been doing some online research and wonder if it might be beta-alanine sensitivity.That sounds very interesting. The reports of paresthesia in subjects given beta-alanine sounds just like what I experience. Chicken is known to contain high levels of beta-alanine, and beta-alanine is an agonist of glycine receptors, which cause inhibitory neurotransmission in the spine. So we have a plausible mechanism for the tingling.Also, when carnitine is consumed, it is cleaved into beta-alanine and histidine. Then, these two amino acids are reassembled in muscles to carnitine. After oral administration of beta-alanine, blood levels rose quickly, peaking at 30-45 minutes, then disappearing after 90-120 minutes.That is consistent with the time course of tingling I experience after a meaty meal. It also seems to occur with me more often at home, although I think I've felt it out. I will have to pay attention to this the next time I eat chicken out.Thanks for the tip! I have wondered for years what causes this, and now I have a prime suspect. Beta-alanine!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • That sounds very interesting. The reports of paresthesia in subjects given beta-alanine sounds just like what I experience. Chicken is known to contain high levels of beta-alanine, and beta-alanine is an agonist of glycine receptors, which cause inhibitory neurotransmission in the spine. So we have a plausible mechanism for the tingling.Also, when carnitine is consumed, it is cleaved into beta-alanine and histidine. Then, these two amino acids are reassembled in muscles to carnitine. After oral administration of beta-alanine, blood levels rose quickly, peaking at 30-45 minutes, then disappearing after 90-120 minutes.That is consistent with the time course of tingling I experience after a meaty meal. It also seems to occur with me more often at home, although I think I've felt it out. I will have to pay attention to this the next time I eat chicken out.Thanks for the tip! I have wondered for years what causes this, and now I have a prime suspect. Beta-alanine!I get it when i eat a white meat...and i think its the high content of niacine...it reminds me of a niacine flush when you take supplements.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thanks for the information. I have been having the same symptoms with chicken and pork since my late 20s (mid-30s now). I have been tested for allergies and that is always negative. My symptoms are limited to my hands. I have also noticed that it is more prevalent with grilled meat versus roasted. I'll definitely read more on beta-alanine! Thanks.Hi all - My sister and I both get tingling sensation (paraesthesia) when we eat poultry. In fact, I have been tracking mine for over 6 months now and have found that it happens to me when I have chicken broth, some fish, some pork, and poultry. We are both in our mid 30s, female, and have had children. We have been doing some online research and wonder if it might be beta-alanine sensitivity. Basically, from what we have seen online, beta-alanine is a naturally occurring amino acid which is created when you digest poultry, fish, and pork. From what we can tell, it isn't dangerous or anything like an allergy, but we are still researching it. It definitely is annoying. I get my tingling (pins and needles) sensation in my upper torso, neck, face, scalp, hands, arms and shoulders. Rarely do I get it in my legs (although sometimes I do). It normally dissipates after 15-20 minutes, but once I had it for over 2 hours (pretty severely). It does almost "hurt" and is very distracting. The hard part is it isn't consistent. I always get it after eating chicken at home, but almost never get it from eating chicken in a restaurant. I don't know if it has to do with quantity or not. My doctor had never heard of this condition....Anyone else confirm this theory?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 5, 2011
    • 01:38 PM
    • 0
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  • I reckon you are right. I suffer from parasthesia when I eat chicken, took me years to figure it out but definitely have it (I have it now, just eaten a nice peri peri breast - face tingling like mad!). My mother has it too.I always though it was a chicken allergy but then I tried beta-alanine supplements - just the once as when I took them (as a training supplement - pure), I thought I'd been set on fire. I assumed that farms pumped chickens full of it to beef them up, but your pharmacological explanation sounds more probable.
    Vamos691 1 Replies
    • January 15, 2012
    • 08:13 PM
    • 0
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  • Thanks for the information on this. I thought I was nuts until I noticed it happening pretty regularly. It happens whether I eat regular discounted store brand chicken or vegetarian fed, no antibiotic, no steriod, free-range chicken. Actually it happens more with the last type. I switched originally because I thought it occurred because of the use of steriods. It happens anyway... whether it's fried, grilled, or sauteed. It really seems the more "pure" the meat is the more it happens. I had a very little bit of it mixed in pasta - it was the 'vegetarian fed, no antibiotic, no steriod, free-range' type - and my hands went crazy. Don't think for a second I'm going to stop eating it. It's just good to know why.I reckon you are right. I suffer from parasthesia when I eat chicken, took me years to figure it out but definitely have it (I have it now, just eaten a nice peri peri breast - face tingling like mad!). My mother has it too.I always though it was a chicken allergy but then I tried beta-alanine supplements - just the once as when I took them (as a training supplement - pure), I thought I'd been set on fire. I assumed that farms pumped chickens full of it to beef them up, but your pharmacological explanation sounds more probable.
    spaxydaxy 1 Replies
    • August 25, 2012
    • 02:59 AM
    • 0
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  • This tingling happens because of going into ketosis which is your body burning fat. Low fat high protein foods while NOT consuming enough carbohydrates will allow this to happen. It's not dangerous at all if it happens occasionally, people like me(I used to do this) do this ON PURPOSE all the time to lose weight, it's the Atkins low carb diet thing. Go to the website and read about the induction phase.They don't tell you about the tingling. I get the tingling in my face and tops of my feet and arms but usually not all at the same time, it's usually one place one time, another place another time. I used to pray for it to happen because it confirmed that I was burning fat, but not anymore. DON'T assume your tingling has the same cause, this is certainly true for my situation but you should go to a doctor to make sure you don't have some kind of neuropathy or whatever. The Atkins low carb dieting has several unwanted side effects like blood clots, kidney stones, keto acidosis,fatty liver,gall stones,pancreatitis. THe diet works but it's NOT worth the risks.
    chocolatechipcookie 1 Replies
    • February 19, 2013
    • 00:42 PM
    • 0
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