Discussions By Condition: Gastrointestinal conditions

Severe Fatigue after Bowel Movement

Posted In: Gastrointestinal conditions 110 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • May 21, 2009
  • 06:24 AM

I am hoping someone else out there has heard of this and can give me some guidance. I get severe fatigue after a bowel movement, and when it happens, the severe fatigue lasts all day (I am destroyed and can't do anything, almost like a severe hang over). It does not happen all the time- it will happen every day for a week or two, then it will disappear for months with no symptoms. The severe fatigue only occurs right after a bowel movement. I can wake up just fine and function normally for a hour or so before my bowel movement, then I'm completely wiped out for the rest of the day once I go. There is nothing special about my poop- it is not particularly hard or soft, it is not liquidy, there is a normal amount coming out (not too much, not too little), it is normal poop color. My bowel movements are not painful and, I can't stress this enough, I AM NOT straining to go or pushing too hard. I have no idea why it happens or why it goes away- I am not doing or eating anything different. My gastro-intestinal doctor doesn't have a clue what's wrong, and he said he's never heard of this symptom before. I have a camera look at my stomach (not during an episode, however) and it appears normal. Does anyone out there have this problem or can give me a guidance on where I should look for answers?

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  • Angela!I got exactly the same issue!Today I had enough and decided to google it.I went to the loo after feeling great in the morning and suddenly I get a massive bout of fatigue. I even went to sleep. By mid afternoon I was better though.Well, what on earth causes this?Must admit I am a veteran fatigue sufferer with 8 years CFS/ME (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome after infection). But ***l I was going to have a good day today and it is such a sudden change.Like you it doesnt happen everytime but quite often to some degree. So I am always alert.Today was the most shocking episode.It felt a little like my bowels were massively exhausted and were drawing all blood and energy I had in me. The only way i can describe it. I just looked up something about the vagus nerve on wikipedia. Is it to do with that? Or a gastro thing?I'd love some answers.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Me too. My energy is zapped immediately after a bowel movement. This morning I was awake and active for three hours before my first bowel movement. About 2 minutes after my first bowel movement, my energy started draining from my muscles. After about 10 minutes, I had to sit down and preferably lie down. You know, being so exhausted that sitting in a chair without arms is extremely draining and you have to find a lower position in the chair where you are practically lying down anyway. I am having a hard time sitting upright to type this right now. I DO NOT strain on the toilet. I am not depressed. I have never had chronic fatigue syndrome. My bowel movements that triggered this yesterday were quite normal, soft (not hard and not with liquid), and fairy quick--pretty much the gold standard of easy bowel movements, but afterward, I am so tired it is a large chore to go up a set of stairs or walk across a room. For me, I can have this type of fatigue reaction for a few days in a row (restarting fatigue after a bowel movement on a given day) and then not have it happen again for weeks or months. Then it returns for some number of days or a week or two. This fatigue would keep me from doing even office work in a chair, so worker productivity is deeply affected by this condition. Is this some kind of temporary bowel condition? How are muscle cells affected in just a few minutes, if they are?Let me use yesterday's bowel movement and subsequent fatigue as an example. I was up and around for about 2 hours by 8:30 with normal, good physical energy before my bowel movement. Right after the bowel movement I started getting steadily more tired over about 10 minutes until I felt I had to slump in my chair (no one was around to look, so I did not have to be presentable). I was physically exhausted. My muscles felt weak--especially my legs, but other muscles, too. After feeling fatigue Two large cups of coffee over a relatively short time did not help (I started getting a little jittery, but without energy to go into action). Then, a full chocolate bar did not help (but I'm willing to try that again). Eating a pasta casserole with some cheese and plenty of salt did not help. After a couple more hours of hours of fatigue yesterday, maybe 4 hours after the offending bowel movement, I drank a 20 ounce bottle of Gatorade, wondering if my electrolytes are somehow thrown way off by these bowel movements. It seemed to give back about a third of my normal energy back yesterday for an hour or so. Maybe that effect was the water or the electrolytes or some coincidence or the placebo effect. I also ate some Triscuits for some carb energy and salt, to no effect as far as I could tell. In the afternoon, at about 2:00, I ate a banana, hoping the potassium would straighten out the problem. I'm not sure if that helped. By late afternoon, though, I started feeling more energy, but I was not back to normal. I did no work yesterday and took it easy, but did not nap. By late evening, I had perhaps 75% of my normal energy back, but my mental crispness was waning because it was late. Last night I got about 7 hours of sleep. This morning, I awoke with less energy than yesterday morning, but had more energy than the night before. A lingering feeling in my muscles had me guessing that I was still feeling the effects of the bowel movement about 22 hours before. At 9:00 this morning, I had another easy bowel movement, and by 10 minutes later, I have been left with little energy. I am now going to lie down. I am a 48 year old married man with two children. As such, I've never been pregnant. I'm about 20 pounds over my ideal weight right now, but was only about 10 pounds over ideal weight until the last several months. I'm 6 feet tall, and am not in extremely bad shape. I've experienced this kind of exhaustion on and off for three or four years now. I work at a desk part-time from home. I was going to go for a 2-hour bike ride yesterday morning, but I didn't have the energy to even start. The same goes for today. I'm trying to get back into regular exercise, but I can't with this condition.Anyone else out there with these symptoms? Please drop a note so we can undestand how common this is and encourage the medical field to look into it.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 1, 2009
    • 03:12 PM
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  • I struggle with this too and along with the extreme fatigue I sometimes experience anxiety. From my own inquiries I have come to believe that this is due to adrenal fatigue. A bowel movement is very stressful to the body, so much so that it is not unheard of to see people suffer a heart attack when having their morning BM. (sounds odd, i know, but I've seen this with some frequency during my 25-year career as a police officer).Learning about adrenal fatigue and how to restore the function of the adrenal glands (our body's stress-shock absorber) would be a good beginning.Dave
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 2, 2009
    • 06:52 PM
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  • Dave, I'll ask my doctor about adrenal fatigue. I recently told my general practitioner about the fatigue after bowel movements and she said it was an unusual complaint/symptom. She mentioned hypothyroidism as one potential reason for fatigue, and noted that the BM part is curious and doesn't line up well with hypothyroidism. I don't have the blood results yet, but I suppose she can look for something in them that might point to adrenal fatigue. I write now to report something else.One thing that I changed several months ago--approximately when the bouts of weakness started--was my coffee sweetener, from Splenda to Nutrasweet/Equal/aspartame. Five days ago I switched back to Splenda (sucralose) and began avoiding diet soft drinks with aspartame, which I also would drink (Diet Coke or Diet Mt. Dew). For the last few days I've had milder bouts of weakness and on most days none at all. Some people report that muscle weakness/fatigue and headaches eased up after stopping use of aspartame. I may be one more, and I'll determine that over the next few months. I'll report relevant blood test results if there's an apparent correlation. If I don't post anything, then there was no known correlation with blood results. --Toast
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 14, 2009
    • 04:27 PM
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  • I am hoping someone else out there has heard of this and can give me some guidance. I get severe fatigue after a bowel movement, and when it happens, the severe fatigue lasts all day (I am destroyed and can't do anything, almost like a severe hang over). It does not happen all the time- it will happen every day for a week or two, then it will disappear for months with no symptoms. The severe fatigue only occurs right after a bowel movement. I can wake up just fine and function normally for a hour or so before my bowel movement, then I'm completely wiped out for the rest of the day once I go. There is nothing special about my poop- it is not particularly hard or soft, it is not liquidy, there is a normal amount coming out (not too much, not too little), it is normal poop color. My bowel movements are not painful and, I can't stress this enough, I AM NOT straining to go or pushing too hard. I have no idea why it happens or why it goes away- I am not doing or eating anything different. My gastro-intestinal doctor doesn't have a clue what's wrong, and he said he's never heard of this symptom before. I have a camera look at my stomach (not during an episode, however) and it appears normal. Does anyone out there have this problem or can give me a guidance on where I should look for answers?Hi there ... I would suggest looking into parasites as the problem ... along with too much wheat, processed foods, and sugar in your diet. Good luck.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 22, 2009
    • 04:43 AM
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  • Dave, If I don't post anything, then there was no known correlation with blood results. --ToastIt's now a couple of weeks later. My blood test results showed normal thyroid function, but positive results for three out of about a dozen autoimmune antibodies. My primary care physician had ordered several of these antibodies as part of that blood test. Fatigue is a common symptom of some autoimmune disorders, where the immune system attacks part of your body that it shouldn't. After my doc saw the positive antibody results, her recommendation was that I schedule an appointment with a rheumatologist, which I have done. Rheumatologists specialize in immune disorders, and it seems like a logical direction to go after my blood test. Maybe the rheumatologist will have an idea why my greatest fatigue is after a bowel movement. I wonder if he will order even further blood tests to narrow things down a bit more. FYI, the antibody tests my primary doctor ordered to look into my fatigue symptoms include ANA antibody, JO-1 antibody, Smith antibody, SCL-70 antibody, RNP antibody, SSA antibody, dsDNA antibody, centromere antibody, histone antibody, hep-2 nuclear antige, SSB, basophil percent (this last one at least is not an antibody) and an ENA interpretation. Also included were some muscle-related tests like creatinine and creatine kinase. Not to forget the thyroid test. I was negative for thyroid problems and for most of the autoimmune antibodies, but, again, positive for three in the latter group.My fatigue has been less severe lately. That's some good news. Good luck.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 23, 2009
    • 06:57 PM
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  • ...try in your daily diet once a day DanActive you get them at any grocery store, my doctor recomended and is helping help inmune system
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 28, 2009
    • 10:25 PM
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  • Hi guys, I have been having the same problem and have been googling around for years trying to find out whats going on. This use to happen to me every day but now only about twice a month. When it happpens i get very tired and cant do much for about 30 minutes or so. I cant really say why it slowed down. The only thing that Ive been doing differently is taking Probiotics and not eating cheese. I read that you need good bacteria in the bowels to keep them healthy. So Im taking the regular probiotics without the laxative in it because i dont need a laxative. Ive also changed my eating habits overall, little to no red meats each week, real juice, little to NO CHEESE, if you think about how hard cheese is when it dries, imagine what the body has to go through to get rid of it. Stetching daily and massaging the problem area really helps me. The only kind of treatment that i heard about was a Chinese treatment. They said this is a vitamin deficiency and prescribed the patient a special diet with some special foods i dont have access to. But good luck to all I hope this information helps and hope eventually this problem goes way for good.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 18, 2009
    • 09:20 AM
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  • Feeling wiped out after a number 2? Me too! I am a caucasian male, 29 yo, ht/wt proportional, if on the leaner side, BP is like 118 / 80 most days. I do have hypothyroidism (diagnosed Jne 2008) but that's it as far as i know. In the last cpl of months I've been occasionally suffering from the vagus syncope that the rest of you have been going thru. I do not have strenuous bowel movements. No diarrhea. My diet is adequate. I sleep 6-7 hrs per night. I exercise occasionally. These episodes begin with me pooping around 10 am (voiding that morning's breakfast and the dinner from the night before) and then I feel mildly wiped out for about 2-4 hours. I've never fainted, or lost power, but I do feel a bit "ugggggh" for this duration. This wipeout improves over time until I feel 100 pct again. WOuld I exercise during these spells? Probably not, but if this is a "blood flow to the brain" issue, then wouldnt a quick jog on the treadmill at work help? Well, I thought about it, and I'm afraid to try when I'm feeling just a smidge liteheaded. Now I don't feel this way after every bowel movement, and I dont know what to think. There is SO LITTLE information about this phenomenon available on line, and I just happened to stumble across this WD page by accident. Nothing on medhelp.com or anywhere else. I went to a urgent care clinic today and got a quick BP and neuro exam, and got an all-clear but to have a follow up with my gen. prac. doc. What is the next step? What do I do? What have you guys found out? is this a diet, blood pressure, heart, or nuerological issue? I'm worried about it being related to the last one on that list. Please, let's all compare notes, and send a message to my inbox please!
    domodo kragon 2 Replies
    • November 29, 2009
    • 11:41 PM
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  • It's now a couple of weeks later. My blood test results showed normal thyroid function, but positive results for three out of about a dozen autoimmune antibodies. Maybe the rheumatologist will have an idea why my greatest fatigue is after a bowel movement. I wonder if he will order even further blood tests to narrow things down a bit more. More good news and a potential cause and apparent resolution for my fatigue. First, it turns out that the autoimmune antibody results were false positives. I was tested again and they were negative, so that was a false lead on a cause for the fatigue. I have no autoimmune issues. Second, the rheumatologist noted that my fatigue was general, but that I had said my thighs/legs felt weakest. For nearly a year the fatigue was caused by some bowel movements and not others. But this changed a few months ago to being fatigued a lot of the time, every day, and the fatigue would grow during a day depending on how active I tried to be. BMs would still occasionally trigger this fatigue.The rheumatologist asked if I had any lower back problems, and I have had a minor irritation in my lower back that stems from a day 2 years ago that I stressed it while using a heavy old pick axe on concrete (clearing ice from a curb). It turns out that the legs, especially the thighs can be fatigued from partial narrowing of the space for nerves in the lower spinal column. He said it could be arthritis in the lower back or a spinal disc warping out of its best shape and getting a little out of position.Impingement of spinal nerves is called spinal stenosis and it can have several causes. An occupational therapist I saw a couple of weeks ago said that with spinal stenosis (when in the lower back) can cause fatigue that gets worse as you continue standing, walking, or some other activity. RESOLUTION: The rheumatologist tested his theory of stenosis affecting the nerves of my lower spine by giving me a prescription for cyclobenzaprine, a generic (cheap) drug that helps some nerve function problems. IT WORKED. I take 1 tablet 1 hour before bedtime. It started working from the first day. Over the 3 to 4 initial days, my fatigue went from nearly constant to nearly nonexistent. A huge change. After about a month on cyclobenzaprine, I stopped taking cyclobenzaprine for two consecutive evenings on purpose, then I restarted taking it on the third evening, but then I forgot to take it on on the next (fourth) evening. My great fatigue returned on the morning of the fifth and continued all day. I took the cyclobenzaprine before bedtime on the fifth day and felt mostly better on the next day and have felt good thereafter as I consistently taken the prescription in the evening. It must have been getting out of my system when I did not take it on 3 of 4 consecutive evenings. There were two temporary side effects to taking the cyclobenzaprine: In the first 4 or 5 days after I started taking it, my skeletal lower back issues reappeared in the way of achiness and tenderness. I felt I might more easily physically injure my back further if I were not careful in my activities. It reminded me of the achiness from the time I first injured my lower back 2 years prior. However, this feeling started easing after 2 days and was gone by about 5 days after starting the prescription. The other temporary side effect was feeling sleepy about 40 minutes after I took the cyclobenzaprine. I also felt groggy after first getting out of bed in the morning. I suppose that's why I'm supposed to take it in the evening. After a week or two, this tiredness mostly disappeared, or maybe I have been asleep by the time I would have really felt it. My rheumatologist said that if a BM were to affect the vagal (spelling?) nerve, it would only have an effect for a few seconds or minutes and not for hours. It seems I have spinal stenosis of some kind. Perhaps my position on the toilet or bowel activity inside affected nerves and nerve impulses that travel from the lower spine down to the legs, causing local fatigue of the legs and also great general fatigue of my whole self. I don't know with great precision, but the prescription made a huge difference for me. I will see my rheumatologist for a follow-up soon and will report anything else of interest. Look into spinal stenosis as a possible culprit. Good luck.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 4, 2010
    • 05:11 PM
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  • It's now a couple of weeks later. My blood test results showed normal thyroid function, but positive results for three out of about a dozen autoimmune antibodies. Maybe the rheumatologist will have an idea why my greatest fatigue is after a bowel movement. I wonder if he will order even further blood tests to narrow things down a bit more. More good news and a potential cause and APPARENT RESOLUTION for my fatigue. First, it turns out that the autoimmune antibody results that I noted in an earlier post were false positives. I was tested again and they were negative, so that was a false lead on a cause for the fatigue. I have no autoimmune issues. Second, the rheumatologist noted that my fatigue was general, but that I had said my thighs/legs felt weakest. For nearly a year the fatigue was caused by some bowel movements and not others. But this changed a few months ago to being fatigued a lot of the time, every day, and the fatigue would grow during a day depending on how active I tried to be. BMs would still occasionally trigger this fatigue.The rheumatologist asked if I had any lower back problems, and I have had a minor irritation in my lower back that stems from a day 2 years ago that I stressed it while using a heavy old pick axe on concrete (clearing ice from a curb, but sometimes hitting the concrete--ouch). It turns out that the legs, especially the thighs can be fatigued from partial narrowing of the space for nerves in the lower spinal column that lead out to the legs. He said it could be arthritis in the lower back or a spinal disc warping out of its best shape and getting a little out of position. Affecting nerves going to the legs can also cause overall fatigue.Impingement of spinal nerves is called spinal stenosis and it can have several causes. An occupational therapist I saw a couple of weeks ago said that with spinal stenosis (when in the lower back) can cause fatigue that gets worse as you continue standing, walking, or some other activity. He didn't know how a BM might trigger this.RESOLUTION: The rheumatologist tested his theory of stenosis affecting the nerves of my lower spine by giving me a prescription for cyclobenzaprine, a generic (cheap) drug that helps some nerve function issues. IT WORKED. I take 1 tablet 1 hour before bedtime.The prescription started working on the day after I took it. Over the 3 to 4 initial days, my fatigue went from nearly constant to nearly nonexistent. A huge change. After about a month on cyclobenzaprine, I stopped taking cyclobenzaprine for two consecutive evenings on purpose, then I restarted taking it on the third evening, but then I forgot to take it on on the next (fourth) evening. My great fatigue returned on the morning of the fifth day and continued all day. I took the cyclobenzaprine before bedtime that day and felt mostly better during the next day and have felt good thereafter as I consistently taken the prescription in the evening. It must have been getting out of my system when I did not take it on 3 of 4 consecutive evenings. There were two temporary side effects to taking the cyclobenzaprine: In the first 4 or 5 days after I started taking it, my skeletal lower back issues reappeared in the way of achiness and tenderness. I felt I might more easily physically injure my back further if I were not careful in my activities. It reminded me of the achiness from the time I first injured my lower back 2 years prior. However, this feeling started easing after 2 days and was gone by about 5 days after starting the prescription. The other temporary side effect was feeling sleepy starting about 40 minutes after I took the cyclobenzaprine. I also felt groggy after first getting out of bed in the morning. But coffee cleared up that. I suppose tiredness is why I'm supposed to take the prescription in the evening. After a week or two, this evening/morning tiredness mostly disappeared. My rheumatologist said that if a BM were to affect the vagal (spelling?) nerve, it would only have an effect for a few seconds or minutes and not for hours. He did not know how BMs are involved, but used my other fatigue symptoms to realize I could have a lower spinal problem. He ordered some tests that were all inconclusive (except some tests found I did not really have an autoimmune problem), and his prescription really did the trick. I guess I have spinal stenosis of some kind. Perhaps my position on the toilet or bowel activity inside affected nerves and nerve impulses that travel from the lower spine down to the legs, causing local fatigue of the legs and also great general fatigue of my whole self after some bowel movements. I don't know the cause with great precision, but the prescription made a huge difference for me. I will see my rheumatologist for a follow-up soon and will report anything else of interest. In any case, have your general practitioner send you to a rheumatologist about your fatigue. They don't just deal with older adults. Good luck.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 4, 2010
    • 05:38 PM
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  • Toast:Thank you so much for your concise report. I too have suffered occasionally with this fatigue following a 'normal' BM. Some times several days in a row, then everything OK for a week or more. I have spent months perusing the internet looking for an answer.I DO have spinal stenosis, plus a multitude of other lower back problems. I also have fibromyalgia. My rheumatologist had prescribed cyclobenzaprine, generic form of Flexeril, to alleviate the insomnia from fibro. It started seeming like I was becoming dependent on the cyclo for getting to sleep, and fearing the need to increase my dose I had stopped taking them. Instead I started relying on valerian for sleep with an occasional cyclo or Xanax (not both on the same night) thrown in. Not my usual dose of 20mg per night.I plan on starting back on the prescribed dose to see how things go. This has been such an exasperating problem. It's bad enough that I can't get much done due to pain, but to be totally wiped out for an entire day due to exhaustion has been disheartening.I will post my results back here after a week or so of being back on the cyclo.
    BikerBug 3 Replies
    • January 22, 2010
    • 00:16 PM
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  • I currently have the same symptoms after suffering flu like symptoms for about 2 weeks, I required IV Fluids to get over this flu feeling, yesterday i went to a gastrologist who suggested it could be from drinking bad water or eating food washed in bad water, currently I am taking over the counter 'combantrin' which is a treatment for threadworm, if this fails i have been given a prescription for metronidazole which is an antibiotic used to treat a variety of bacterial and parasitic infections, so i will update with my progress at a later date to let ye know if these treatments helped..
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 28, 2010
    • 03:50 AM
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  • I have had fatigue after BM but have narrowed it down to a reaction of the vagus nerve that is linked to the viscera and bowels. It can slow the heart causing fatigue and many other bizarre symptoms such as sneezing as you move bowels even coughing. Toast:Thank you so much for your concise report. I too have suffered occasionally with this fatigue following a 'normal' BM. Some times several days in a row, then everything OK for a week or more. I have spent months perusing the internet looking for an answer.I DO have spinal stenosis, plus a multitude of other lower back problems. I also have fibromyalgia. My rheumatologist had prescribed cyclobenzaprine, generic form of Flexeril, to alleviate the insomnia from fibro. It started seeming like I was becoming dependent on the cyclo for getting to sleep, and fearing the need to increase my dose I had stopped taking them. Instead I started relying on valerian for sleep with an occasional cyclo or Xanax (not both on the same night) thrown in. Not my usual dose of 20mg per night.I plan on starting back on the prescribed dose to see how things go. This has been such an exasperating problem. It's bad enough that I can't get much done due to pain, but to be totally wiped out for an entire day due to exhaustion has been disheartening.I will post my results back here after a week or so of being back on the cyclo.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 1, 2010
    • 07:00 PM
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  • I've been sick with this for about 3 years. I get extreme fatigue after bowel movements and sometimes after eating. These episodes usually last between 1-3 hours. I get so exhausted that I have to take a nap for about an hour. My breathing becomes heavy and my heart rate increases and my body gets real cold. Sometimes the fatigue can last all day. I don't have any other bowl problems that I know of. I'm male, 29 yrs old, not over weight and I try and exersize once a day when I don't feel sick. I would describe my symtpoms as feeling more ill than just tired. I used to be an alcoholic and had a very poor diet for years. I had to quit drinking 2 yrs ago because I was feeling so ill. Unfortunalty quitting the booze and smoking and eating healthy hasn't made me feel much better. Last spring I was diagnosed with celiac so I thought after a few months of a gluten free diet I would feel better, not the case. I don't know whats wrong with me. The only think I can think of is that there is something wrong with my intestines. I got a doctors appointment this week and I'm gonna see if they can do a lower endoscopy to see if they can find anything. I'm also gonna see if they'll do some tests on my pancreas as I read that also affects digestion. I don't know how much more of this I can take. This illness has been ruining my life. I just wish problem would reveal itself. I hope its not a tape worm, lol. J/K my folks once had a cat with tape worm so I know what kind of signs they leave behind, yuck.
    Chiral 2 Replies
    • February 7, 2010
    • 05:00 AM
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  • Sometimes I get tired after a bowel movement, that's why I found this web page, so I will add my input. I am a 46 year old male. I have had this trouble for about 18 months, off and on, sometimes it happens daily, other times it does not happen for many months.The larger the bowel movement, the more tired it makes me, when it does happen. I thought it might have something to do with a large bowel movement displacing how well my insides are comfortably situated that day.In the same time frame, I have also been checked for two strange liver readings in annual blood tests. I have had a liver ultrasound and a colonoscopy, both negative for problems. They said I had "fatty liver disease," which they said was a catch-all term when they could not assign my problem to any other specific reason. I am about 50 lbs. overweight, I am 5' 10" at 225 lbs. The only other comment I have is that a good nap seems to help me. Again, I thought it meant my insides became "displaced" after a big bowel movement, so immediate rest allowed my insides to comfortably re-situate themselves.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 9, 2010
    • 08:01 PM
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  • I thought I was alone with this very strange symptom until I googled it today. I get the fatigue within about 10 seconds of being "done". And it is overwhelming. I have not discussed it with my doctor because it sounded so bizarre. I want to thank the couple of folks that mentioned back issues. I have had back issues since I was 16. I've had two surgeries on my lower back due to disc issues and they want to do another one. Now that you mentioned the back issue, the next time I see my orthopaedic surgeon, I am going to mention all of this to him. And here I thought I was the only one who was experiencing this... If I find out any more information from my doctor, I'll post it. -Karen
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 13, 2010
    • 08:44 PM
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  • I have the same experience. I think an accupuncturist might know the reason for it. I am still wondering if it is due to having eaten a lot of fat (like peanut or almon butter), or to not keeping well hydrated.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 17, 2010
    • 03:16 AM
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  • I saw a gastrointestinal doctor the other day about this condition and I asked if he could do some tests like a colonoscopy and test to make sure my panceas is functioning properly. He said that he won't do any tests because I'm not feeling abdominal pain or producing abnormal waste. He thinks that it's anxiety that I've somehow internalized and associated it with bowl movements because I have a history of anxiety problems. I havn't had anxiety for about 2 years now and I don't take any medications for it. I don't undestand how he could think this is a reason for my symptoms, what a crazy idea for a doctor to say. It makes me so mad. I've got no where with these doctors in the last year and a half since I started seeing them. I have lower back problems as well and when I sit down for long periods of time my left leg also starts to hurt. The pain and numbness is on the back side of my leg and goes down to a little past my knee. I've had the leg thing for about 1 year and lower back pains for about 5 years. I suppose I should consider that my symptoms are related some how.
    Chiral 2 Replies
    • February 17, 2010
    • 07:26 AM
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  • I think this thread might have developed a significant breakthrough in diagnosis for at least some us who experience great fatigue after BMs. Some of the people writing here who get debilitating fatigue for at least an hour or several hours or a couple of days after a triggering BM also happen to have a lower back problem. Specifically, it seems that some of us have spinal stenosis in the lower back--a sort of impingement or pinching of one or more nerves there. This might be stenosis of the nerve or nerves where they exit the spine and serve the legs. Already, some classes of practitioners know that stenosis affecting these nerves In my case, spinal stenosis affects the nerves leading down to the legs, AND they know that this not only can cause fatigue in the legs, but can cause overall, overwhelming fatigue. Some people who have written in this thread might have spinal stenosis without knowing it. Now, why BMs would trigger the stenosis to start the fatigue effect is not known. Is it that movement of waste through the bowels--only some of the time--leans on a leg-serving nerve root such that the fatigue is triggered? Spinal stenosis is a general term. Just to be clear, here is the definition of spinal stenosis from Medicinet: "Spinal stenosis: Narrowing of the spaces in the spine, resulting in compression of the nerve roots or spinal cord by bony spurs or soft tissues, such as disks, in the spinal canal. This occurs most often in the lumbar spine (in the low back) but also occurs in the cervical spine (in the neck) and less often in the thoracic spine (in the upper back).Spinal stenosis is most often caused by degeneration of the discs between the vertebrae ..."So as a trigger for many of us, we would be talking about spinal stenosis that affects the nerve root that serves our legs and creates overwhelming, whole-body fatigue. This stenosis would perhaps become worse and trigger fatigue from having a bowel movement and changing the physical pressures on that nerve. In my opinion, there is a clear-cut enough hypothesis to justify medical research. The hypothesis is that in some people BMs can worsen (or directly cause?) spinal stenosis in the lower back to the point of bringing on overwhelming fatigue for several hours or a day or two or three. A non-dependency muscle relaxant, such as cyclobenzaprine, might be the treatment of choice. That, and rest. Maybe a neurologist or a gastroenterologist, when confronted with the BM-triggering-fatigue phenomenon, could shed light and help confirm or refute some of our thoughts about how BMs bring on long spells of fatigue.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 22, 2010
    • 04:39 PM
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