Discussions By Condition: Skin conditions

Finger nails separating from nail bed

Posted In: Skin conditions 19 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • May 15, 2009
  • 02:03 PM

Hey everyone :)
I have a less-than-serious, yet nagging issue with my finger nails...
It seems as though they are separating further and further from the nail bed and it's beginning to worry me. I would post a picture if I had my camera here, but unfortunately right now i dont. I'm particularly worried about 1 nail which seems to be separated much further than the rest (about 1/3 of the nail is separated from the nail bed). Now, I've never been very kind to my hands as I work with them a lot (i do a ton of arts and am just generally pretty rough on my hands). There doesn't appear to be any debris under the nail so I don't suspect there's a fungal problem of any kind. They've been this way for quite some time and are just horrible looking (every girl would love a nice set of nails- am i right?)

Does anyone have any suggestions on what could be causing this or how I could get the nail to reconnect to the nail bed (is that possible?) I'm not even sure what kind of doctor I would see about this sort of issue. I tried scheduling an appointment with several dermatologists about another skin issue recently and it's impossible to get an appointment anytime within the next 4 months (what is the DEAL with that?!).

Any help would be sooo much appreciated :) Thanks in advance.

~D

Reply Flag this Discussion

19 Replies:

  • Hi! I suggest you see your GP or PCP .... ASAP! Fungal, bacterial, or other infections are not always visible. Also, it could be a reaction to something you are exposing your nails/bed to, which may possibly cause the above-mentioned or aggravate something already in play. I would find out in case it is being aggravated further by products/other; take the products with you that you use that could be potential culprits. Also, don't forget to take with you anything and everything you take ... prescription medications, OTC medications ... as needed, supplements, etc. for review.
    neurotransmissing 145 Replies Flag this Response
  • thanks for your advice! i figured it would be best for me to have it looked at but i wasn't sure what kind of specialist to see for such a condition, and i haven't had a family doctor in some time (lucky me, i'm usually pretty healthy haha).
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Quite honestly, I don't know of a specialist for that either; but I suspect the GP or PCP would be just fine; if not, they will direct you. I hope you get in there soon though ... yes, we chicks do like lovely nails! :rolleyes:And as an added bonus, you will then be an established patient with your very own GP/PCP ... door number 1.:D
    neurotransmissing 145 Replies Flag this Response
  • Does anyone have any suggestions on what could be causing this or how I could get the nail to reconnect to the nail bed (is that possible?) I'm not even sure what kind of doctor I would see about this sort of issue. I tried scheduling an appointment with several dermatologists about another skin issue recently and it's impossible to get an appointment anytime within the next 4 months (what is the DEAL with that?!). The most common reason nail plate separation is fungus, but since you state that there is none of that powdery stuff under the plate, then the second-most common reason is psoriasis. Psoriatic nails are often mis-diagnosed as fungal nails, even by dermatologists. Unfortunately, there is no good topical treatment for psoriatic nail plates. There are other things as well such as lichen planus, but these are much more rare. As for appointment times -- for many years now, the dermatologist profession has not increased the number of residency slots in order to keep up with the growing population. There really isn't any good reason for this, and an honest dermatologist will tell you it is so they will keep their job security (the profession as a whole would never admit this). Also, more and more females are getting into the profession and many of them do not choose to work full-time. Thirdly, more and more derms are getting into cosmetic dermatology where they do not have to worry about insurance reimbursement, and that leaves less people to treat actual medical problems. All of these will keep the numbers of derms practicing medical dermatology at levels too low to meet reasonable demand in all but the most popular places to live.
    Caladan 87 Replies Flag this Response
  • Quite honestly, I don't know of a specialist for that either; but I suspect the GP or PCP would be just fine; if not, they will direct you. I hope you get in there soon though ... yes, we chicks do like lovely nails! :rolleyes:And as an added bonus, you will then be an established patient with your very own GP/PCP ... door number 1.:Dgood point. that's definitely one of those things on my to do list that i have put off for far too long haha.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • The most common reason nail plate separation is fungus, but since you state that there is none of that powdery stuff under the plate, then the second-most common reason is psoriasis. Psoriatic nails are often mis-diagnosed as fungal nails, even by dermatologists. Unfortunately, there is no good topical treatment for psoriatic nail plates. There are other things as well such as lichen planus, but these are much more rare. As for appointment times -- for many years now, the dermatologist profession has not increased the number of residency slots in order to keep up with the growing population. There really isn't any good reason for this, and an honest dermatologist will tell you it is so they will keep their job security (the profession as a whole would never admit this). Also, more and more females are getting into the profession and many of them do not choose to work full-time. Thirdly, more and more derms are getting into cosmetic dermatology where they do not have to worry about insurance reimbursement, and that leaves less people to treat actual medical problems. All of these will keep the numbers of derms practicing medical dermatology at levels too low to meet reasonable demand in all but the most popular places to live.eeee.. i sure hope it's not that. i have had mild eczema, but i've never had it anywhere on my hands and i've always been able to keep it at bay with heavy moisturizing. i suppose i will just have to get into a doctor's office to figure out what's going on. i wonder if they refer me to a dermatologist, perhaps i can get in there sooner! the thing that drives me crazy is after having to wait 4 months to see a derm, i may not having any symptoms for them to examine! i'm not referring to my nail problem, but my eczema is very come and go. i know as soon as i get an appointment, it'll be cleared up (for the time being) and i won't be able to be treated for when my symptoms return. it's such a headache.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • If you have to wait four months for an appointment and are worried that the condition might be cleared at that time......take pictures NOW or when the condition is at it's worst to show the doc. Take very detailed pictures-- make sure they show the whole problem from many angles. This should allow you to be treated even if the problem has resolved itself by the time you see your doc. But.....does the problem usually come and go or is it relatively constant? Either way, that would be a good thing to discuss with your dermatologist. Best of luck to you!
    Harmonium 322 Replies Flag this Response
  • If you have to wait four months for an appointment and are worried that the condition might be cleared at that time......take pictures NOW or when the condition is at it's worst to show the doc. Take very detailed pictures-- make sure they show the whole problem from many angles. This should allow you to be treated even if the problem has resolved itself by the time you see your doc. But.....does the problem usually come and go or is it relatively constant? Either way, that would be a good thing to discuss with your dermatologist. Best of luck to you!Good idea. Not to deter from the original subject, but my eczema comes and goes. In the summer I usually get a small patch or 2 and I can usually clear it up with heavy moisturizing.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have been having the same problem for greater than a year. I have had every test the dermatologist as well as my MD could think of. Now it has spread to nearly all of my nails and sometimes now the skin right behind the nail hurts a little and starts to peel. I am guessing there is no cure and I just have to go around with lifted nails for the rest of my life. Kind of scary and very disappointing.
    ovicki 1 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have been having the same problem for greater than a year. I have had every test the dermatologist as well as my MD could think of. Now it has spread to nearly all of my nails and sometimes now the skin right behind the nail hurts a little and starts to peel. I am guessing there is no cure and I just have to go around with lifted nails for the rest of my life. Kind of scary and very disappointing.oh man... i'm sorry to hear that. i keep wondering if it it just because of repeated trauma? i'm not sure about you, but i am really tough on my hands and my nails: sculpting, cleaning, jewelry making, gardening, general crafting... just bru-tal on fingernails. the pinky that was the most damaged seems to be growing back up a little which is nice to see. i'm going to try to wear gloves when i can when doing rough activites and see if it helps. i havent had a chance to get into a doctor yet but i'm pretty convinced it's not fungal or related to another skin problem.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • HI! I had the same things years ago (I ThINK) ...my nails completely grew outuntil there was no fingernails left-just the naked nail bed-it started with them growing out and their was a naked moon shape until the nails grew out completely leaving a naked nail bed. I had extreme malnourishment. I put natural vitamin E oil on the empty nail bed and although I didn't expect it to, the nailbed rehardened into new nails! New nails didn't grow in, the nail bed turned into nails! At first they were soft...although they still grew out past the nail bed, and then they got hard...
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Complications of Crohn’s Disease

    Recognize the risks associated with Crohn’s disease.

    8 Surprising Facts About Cholesterol

    Did you know that one in six US adults has high cholesterol?

  • I have this problem for over 25 years. One dermatologists said to drink more water. This seems to have solved the finger nails. The toe nails seems to come and go I used a prescription and that worked for a while then it returned and they no longer make that drug. The podiatrist cut the nail and treated for fungus. This made it worse and gave me ingrown toe nails. The next dermatologist said do not cut the nails and clean out under them It pushes ot further in and spreads. So I stopped the podiatrist. Then Dr. Oz on Oprah said it's a mild infection and soak in vinegar and try not to keep the area cover. Moisture and heat make it worse. So I'm open toed for the summer and it's getting better. From What? Who knows. I've heard Vicks, getting the throid checked and bleach work too. Good Luck
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi! I suggest you see your GP or PCP .... ASAP! Fungal, bacterial, or other infections are not always visible. Also, it could be a reaction to something you are exposing your nails/bed to, which may possibly cause the above-mentioned or aggravate something already in play. I would find out in case it is being aggravated further by products/other; take the products with you that you use that could be potential culprits. Also, don't forget to take with you anything and everything you take ... prescription medications, OTC medications ... as needed, supplements, etc. for review.Could nail seperation have to do with age? My 86 year old grandmother has this problem and her doctor said it was due to her age. It is painful and he did not offer any suggestion for how to fix this problem.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Can this problem have to do with age? My 86 year old grandmother is dealing with this and her dermatologist said it is because of her age and didn't offer any help.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I went to a special dermatologist in NYC, specializing in nails.He diagnosed eczema, and the only thing that would TEMPORARILY help, is if I had a series of cortisone shots under my fingernails........OUCH!!Guess I will have to put up with my ugly, UGLY, nails.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 9, 2009
    • 02:31 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Hi,I have suffered this condition for about ten years now and have discovered that it's linked to thyroid problems. You do not need to see a dermatologist because they are a waste of time, they even told me that I had no hope .... absolutely useless. Make sure you undertake all the needed tests because thyroid disorders are very tricky to find... do not just go for a blood test only. Have faith and do not give up searching!Best wishes.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 14, 2010
    • 08:40 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I have suffered from nails separating from the bed for many years. I have psoriasis and know it is related to that. As others have said - there is no cure at this time. I tramatized my nails by playing the piano aobut 10 years ago and it got worse (now effecting 5 out of 10 nails). My solution has always been nail polish and daily vinegar drops in the effected nails. Always - as you may know - keep you nails shorter as the pain of hitting the nail on a hard surface causes you to see stars!!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • This started happening to me when I used Sally Hansen Triple Strong Nail Fortifier (I don't normally wear any nailpolish). I stopped using it and nails returned to normal. I tried it again and again the condition appeared. Product going into trash.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I know that this thread is old, but I stumbled upon it while trying to figure out why my pinky nails are separating from the nail beds, and the nail edges are flat (one corner is even starting to upturn.) I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about a year ago, and I noticed that this started happening to my nails after my doctor (stupidly) decided to lower my hormone dose. Typically, nail problems related to thyroid issues are that the nails separate from the beds, are prone to splitting/breaking, and that the nail has little or no lunula (white "half-moon" at the base of the nail, near the cuticle.) For anyone experiencing these nail problems, it would be a good idea to be seen by your PCP, and if it turns out to be thyroid-related, ask for a referral to an endocrinologist. Thyroid hormone levels are hard to place on a perfect scale, because everyone is so different. What my doctor thought was too high was actually when I felt the best. Once he had me in what he considered a "normal range" (ranges tend to be based largely on the doctor's own opinion, since there is no golden number) my symptoms reappeared, including weird fingernail problems. Automatically going with the idea that the problems might be bacterial/fungal related means that you could be missing out on the message that your nails are trying to send to you. Best to see your doctor, in case the nails are simply a symptom of a much bigger problem.
    danielleann 1 Replies
    • September 30, 2011
    • 00:04 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.
Advertisement

8 Health Dangers of Depression

Unmanaged depression can take a toll on your physical health.

Best Cough & Cold Meds for Kids

Help your child feel better, faster.

What HIV Positive Women Should Know About Sex

You can have sex after an HIV diagnosis.

Food Choices for Diabetes

What, when and how much you eat affects your blood sugar.

6 Exercises for Multiple Sclerosis

Ease your way into these stretching and strengthening moves,

Advertisement