Discussions By Condition: Nerve conditions

dropping things

Posted In: Nerve conditions 6 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • June 7, 2006
  • 07:44 AM

I sometimes involuntarilly drop things. This is beginning to happen more
frequently. This problem is bilaterial. I have had an EMG, NCV, and SSEP
done and these tests are normal. One neurologist told me it was because
I wasn't concentrating and another said he just didn't have an answer for
me as to why I drop things. I asked the latter if a nerve or muscle biopsy
would be useful and his reply was no. This past November I had C5/C6
and C/6/C7 removed and fused and at the same time had L4/L5 and L5/S1
removed and fused. Has anyone else had this problem with the hands and if so what tests did your neuro do to find the problem?

Thanks,
Tom:)

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6 Replies:

  • I have been studying Myotonic Dystrophy. Its probably not what you wanted to get for a reply but I have a son that has been having numerous muscle problems that no one can explain. so far we have a positive strep throat culture when he was feeling fine despite the neuro symptoms- PANDAS is the hypothesis so far but I know that Myotonic Dystrophy is a possiblity as they tested me for it briefly in relation to thier thoughts about my son and recently my mother has been told the same as she has odd complaints as well. if you study it you'll see that it is entirely possible. I notice as I get older that my muscles don't relax in my hands , arms and else where. I can't open things like caps to bottles and cups and now that I think about it I've had times in my life that correspond. Its scary....?????? I been noticing my son dropping things out of his hands and not meaning too, like crayons, etc. talk to your doctor, but study first. Good luck.
    vigilantmom3 5 Replies
    • September 25, 2006
    • 11:13 PM
    • 0
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  • i have 2 herneated discs in neck. I drop things. The question is do you have a deseese causing your disc problems? I thoguth I had cushings but just got to a good doc who says I look more like acromegaly. He is testing for both. Do you have other health problems that you think are not related?
    tam4givin 19 Replies
    • December 7, 2006
    • 08:38 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Motor Skills Disorder: Motor coordination disorder or motor dyspraxia) is a human developmental disorder and is neurological in origin. The disorder has its basis in the brain, a network of neural connections that allow humans to process the information received. Motor Dyspraxia is a result of weak or disorganised connections in the brain, which then translates to trouble with motor coordination. Movements are performed because the brain sends messages to the area requiring action.Rett Syndrome: A childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that affects females almost exclusively. Loss of muscle tone is usually the first symptom. Other early symptoms may include problems crawling or walking and diminished eye contact. As the syndrome progresses, a child will lose purposeful use of her hands and the ability to speak. Compulsive hand movements such as wringing and washing follow the loss of functional use of the hands. The inability to perform motor functions is perhaps the most severely disabling feature of Rett syndrome, interfering with every body movement, including eye gaze and speech.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 11, 2006
    • 11:04 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Both my sister and youngest daughter have a funny bone that causes them to become almost paralyzed when going into hysterical laughter. This may seem like nothing, but whole stacks of dishes and driving off the road are not funny to the rest of us.I know there's a name for this neurological reaction that shuts off the ability for the body to function for about 5 or ten minutes. What is it?thanks, Barb in Tahoebhb0818@yahoo.com775 230 1618
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • my brother had back surgery last year and hip surgery recently and gets a sudden bilateral weakness hands and legs drops things like a coffee cup cant use walker to walk since he briefly can collapsehead tests said no epilepsy he is 64off oxy now uses fent patch any ideas about this??? thxredskins@gbis.comI sometimes involuntarilly drop things. This is beginning to happen morefrequently. This problem is bilaterial. I have had an EMG, NCV, and SSEPdone and these tests are normal. One neurologist told me it was becauseI wasn't concentrating and another said he just didn't have an answer forme as to why I drop things. I asked the latter if a nerve or muscle biopsywould be useful and his reply was no. This past November I had C5/C6and C/6/C7 removed and fused and at the same time had L4/L5 and L5/S1removed and fused. Has anyone else had this problem with the hands and if so what tests did your neuro do to find the problem?Thanks,Tom:)
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 19, 2009
    • 05:37 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Both my sister and youngest daughter have a funny bone that causes them to become almost paralyzed when going into hysterical laughter. This may seem like nothing, but whole stacks of dishes and driving off the road are not funny to the rest of us.I know there's a name for this neurological reaction that shuts off the ability for the body to function for about 5 or ten minutes. What is it?thanks, Barb in Tahoebhb0818@yahoo.com775 230 1618Hi Barb in Tahoe,I was wondering if your sisters also had episodes of excessive sleepiness or any of the following symptoms as what you describe sounds alot like a symptom of Narcolepsy. Take a look and if they do seem like things that happen to them tell them to go see a sleep specialistCataplexy (loss of muscle control): People with narcolepsy often have a sudden loss of muscle control while awake, usually triggered by strong emotions, such as laughing. Hallucinations: Some people with narcolepsy experience vivid, sometimes frightening, visual or auditory sensations while falling asleep or upon awakening. Sleep paralysis: Sleep paralysis is the inability to move or talk at the beginning or end of sleep. Microsleep: Microsleeps are very brief sleep episodes during which people with narcolepsy continue to function (talk, put things away, etc.), and then awaken with no memory of the activities. Nighttime wakefulness: People with narcolepsy may have periods of wakefulness at night, with hot flashes, elevated heart rate, and sometimes intense alertness. Rapid entry into REM sleep: Narcoleptics have unique sleep cycles. They enter the REM, or dream, phase of sleep right after falling asleep, whereas most people take about 90 minutes to enter the REM phase. Someone with narcolepsy will experience the characteristics of REM sleep (vivid dreams and muscle paralysis) at the beginning of sleep, even if that sleep is during the day. good luck
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 5, 2010
    • 01:39 AM
    • 0
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