Discussions By Condition: Dental conditions

Dental abscess under new crown

Posted In: Dental conditions 19 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • June 7, 2006
  • 05:39 AM

I was treated for a dental abscess when I was 6 months pregnant as a emergency procedure, then 4 months later I was retreated and got a crown on top of this tooh, after 6 months it got infected again!!:mad: how can that would be possible?:confused: somebody have an idea? I think it is the dentist fault for bad treatment, I do not know what to do, he send me to the endodontist and 2 weeks of ATB but all this it is a lot of pain, more money, time and frustration.
Advices?:(

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19 Replies:

  • Guess what, no dental procedures have 100% success rate and nothing in dentistry last forever. Even with optimum care there is still a 20-30% risk of failure for root canal done on a tooth with abscess. In this case, the only thing your dentist did wrong was failing to inform you the success/failure rate of root canal, not bad treatment, because even if it's done by the best endodontist in the world it can still fail. Just like getting heart surgery done, ever heard of any cardiac surgeon giving a warranty for 100% successful heart surgery? No? I thought so.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • August 22, 2006
    • 08:25 AM
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  • Advice: Brush twice a daily, floss daily before brushing, have regular dental check up at least once a yr and x rays done every 2 years and reduce the amount of soft drinks consumed. Dental decay is reversible, if it's found early. If you've done the abovementioned for the past 5 years you wouldn't even need a root canal in the first place. Contrary to popular belief, pregnancy does not cause decay and no the foetus doesn's suck all the calcium from your teeth. It's mainly cause by change of diet and poor oral hygiene, but the decays would have to be present in the first place as it takes at least 5 yrs to progress from early decay to abscess but could be sped up when diet changed to a high sugar diet and poor oral hygiene.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • August 22, 2006
    • 08:30 AM
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  • I don't think you are being fair! I care for my teeth properly and even take calcium but during pregnancy my teeth cracked. Had numerous root canals, infections under the crowns, under the teeth, lots of retreatment, and finally I lost 3 molars + 4 wisdom teeth. Once the teeth are fractured, bacteria follows the the crack into your jaw and no matter how many root canals you have, it will still follow the cracks. Usually the tooth must go and when it finally does, you're relieved. I have even had to have a $6000 bridge cut off to pull the teeth that was holding them. I am only 32. Taking steroids would sometimes make pus come up around the teeth.
    Angst2Amity 12 Replies
    • November 16, 2006
    • 07:04 PM
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  • You should never rule out differences in anatomy. Apparently my teeth crack and no I don't have TMJ or grind or anything else. Why would you tell someone "oh you had this trauma, but if you were smarter it wouldn't have happened" when you don't know anything about them? Uk, I think people come to this website to find some answers not more doctor downtalk.
    Angst2Amity 12 Replies
    • November 16, 2006
    • 07:08 PM
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  • I had a similiar experience - a root canal and crown, and years later found out that the tooth was cracked and a painless infection had gone into the jaw (large cavity below the tooth). Not diagnosed until pus started oozing around the tooth (even though the jaw cavity showed on dentist x-rays and a doctor's bone scan).
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 9, 2006
    • 00:59 AM
    • 0
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  • Hey - everyone with lots of abscesses in teeth, get tested for Celiac Sprue. It is a disorder that makes you not absorb minerals and vitamins, making your teeth crack apart. Celiac Sprue can be eliminated by not eating any gluten, in those that have it. Look up celiac.com for more info - just found out I may have it.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 9, 2006
    • 02:31 AM
    • 0
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  • This question is directed to any dentist out there. I visited a new dentist yesterday for a comprehensive diagnostic exam, cleaning and full mouth x-ray. This is the first time I've been to a dentist in 3 years - however - I brush my teeth twice a day and floss every night. This dentist showed me a "microscopic spot" at the tip of my root under a molar with a crown. He claims that I could likely have an abcess under this crown. I questioned him about his suspicion because I have had none of the symptoms for a tooth abscess (tooth pain, swelling, etc.) and he stated "patients can have latent tooth absesses that lay dormant for years and then pop without warning". The crown shows no evidence of cracks or damage and has been fine since I got it about 7 years ago. One of his explanations for a cause is that the crown prep work could have been faulty. If that was the case, I would think a problem would have occurred before 7 years. I don't feel comfortable with his explaination and am considering a second opinion. My feeling is that this dentist office (a large practice in the Washington D.C. area) is trying to sell me an otherwise needless dental procedure because I have dental insurance that will pay for most of it.Does it sound logical that I could have an abscess without any of the normal symptoms?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 10, 2007
    • 08:25 PM
    • 0
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  • You can get another abcess after the tooth in question is fixed. When that happens, you usually have to end up losing the tooth. Even having the tooth repaired again may not help. I know from experience.And as for that dentist above, I'm glad I'll never have to see him. There is nothing worse than having your teeth fixed by a pious, pompous, self-righteous, know-it-all-dentist. I never knew a doctor who belittled people for being sick. You became a dentist to fix teeth. Operative word here, FIX. Be happy some people don't have good oral hygeine habits. It keeps you paid. And I would advise keeping your mouth shut while your patients have theirs open for you.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 22, 2007
    • 05:35 AM
    • 0
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  • X-ray can only HELP with diagnose of root canal infection. It should not be used solely to determine "abcess under this crown." Other testings must be done: cold, hot, EPT, percussion, and/or palpation. Ask your dentist to use these tests to see if it is really pulp related.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 22, 2007
    • 08:25 AM
    • 0
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  • Yes! You can have an infection in your jaw without any symptoms. This happened to me after having wisdom teeth out - years later I was "lucky" and the infection came up through the gums. I could have lost my jaw, as the infection was inside the bone, eating away the bone. I had to have 2 teeth removed and two implants. Your dentist may be right - mine was a slow moving infection that took years to show. I WAS lucky in that the tissue inside the jaw grows back and all is well. Good luck.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 28, 2007
    • 02:29 AM
    • 0
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  • I an 8 months pregnant and just came from the densit and was told I may have an abcess under my crown in an old root canal. He wants to take my old crown off and see what is going on in there, and then replace it. My maternity Dr. asked me why he doesn't just treat it with antibiotics first to see if it will help. I am not sure what to do, is this treatment really necessary??
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
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  • Hi,You need to be seeing an endodontist, not a dentist. They can go into the side of your jaw through the bone, check the bone, check the nerves, and clean up any damage done.Yes root canals fail if they are not completely properly and if the dentist does not get down the the root tip.Having your tooth pulled if all fine and dandy but if there is any bacteria eating away the bone, then you could still have troubles in the future.5 - 10 % of root canals fail. Having them redone usually doesn't work either.See an endodontist.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 21, 2007
    • 11:13 PM
    • 0
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  • Hi, I had two bridges on my front top six teeth a month ago, (six crowns) I have had extreme sensitivity to cold water, food and now it has become sensitive to heat as well. Keeping in mind this is a brand new procedure for me so I am not understanding why so much pain. I have been calling for weeks in pain but now it is increased to unbearable.I have been again, calling the doctors/dental office three days crying in extreme pain, no sleep, no relief in sight, for 3 days; no one would call me back, my husband finally called them and had words with them, turns out it was about 400 dollars we will owe when the WORK is completed on another tooth, anyways, he ALLOWED me to come in today and found an abscess under my brand new crown tooth number 8, where there was not even a cavity before (it is the bridge anchor?)My question is, WHY and HOW has an abscess formed now when I just had so much work done to help my smile. And is it not against the law to deny pain treatment to one of your patients? And NO, I am not one of those who complains over every little ache.dentalpainintexas
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • August 22, 2008
    • 02:06 AM
    • 0
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  • Sounds like thay need to do a root canal.
    marieg 1 Replies
    • August 23, 2008
    • 05:22 AM
    • 0
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  • Yes that is what they say, however, I am not clear on how this developed and would like to hear (understand) some opinions on how a healthy tooth, with a new crown to anchor a bridge has abscessed.Thank you,extremepainintexas
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • August 24, 2008
    • 03:34 PM
    • 0
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  • I was inspired to register because I feel like I am following in extremepainintexas's footsteps (or bitemarks :(. ) Today is Thanksgiving and I feel terrible paging the dentist, then his partner, than my internist, then my cardiologist, but I tried (after the Vicodin and antibiotics) everything I could find online with no relief. Onions? Peanut butter? Really? I just talked to the dentist I'd seen yesterday (new terrible pain under a crown that had been problem free and looked fine two days ago) and told him now the swelling was visable and I'd spent the day rocking on the floor holding an icepack to my face or pouring all sorts of ridiculous items onto my tooth. He said it is probably abscessed and he will drain it in the next couple of days. Yesterday he'd said he'd send me to someone for a root canal...? All the online info seems to imply I'd probably need both. The crown is literally pushed up a couple of millimeters so the teeth on the right can't even touch! Any advice? (Sorry I sound like a nut, but I can't focus with all the pain and nonworking painmeds!)
    cody1975 1 Replies
    • November 28, 2008
    • 01:51 AM
    • 0
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  • Advice: Brush twice a daily, floss daily before brushing, have regular dental check up at least once a yr and x rays done every 2 years and reduce the amount of soft drinks consumed. Dental decay is reversible, if it's found early. If you've done the abovementioned for the past 5 years you wouldn't even need a root canal in the first place. Contrary to popular belief, pregnancy does not cause decay and no the foetus doesn's suck all the calcium from your teeth. It's mainly cause by change of diet and poor oral hygiene, but the decays would have to be present in the first place as it takes at least 5 yrs to progress from early decay to abscess but could be sped up when diet changed to a high sugar diet and poor oral hygiene.It could also be that her tooth was fractured and the dentist didn't detect the extent of the fracture... no matter how much she brushes and flosses. I hope you aren't so condesending to your patients. And I'm sure you've heard of bad doctors, right? Guess what? There are bad dentists too.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 14, 2009
    • 04:24 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I have a dental abscess under old crown (3 years old). I did have an exposed root that just recently had a bonding agent applied, but my question is whether my abscess could had been caused by the root being exposed for several weeks.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have had many abscesses and have had many root canals and crowns because of these. You say you were treated for this when you were 6 months pregnant but do not say what the treatment was, if it was a root treatment and it is possible that it was not done to the very tip of the root and abscess can form again or the cap is too high and the constant knocking on the tooth causes a new abscess. I have had this too. I have then had an apesectomy (not sure if it is spellt right). This is where they cut through the gum to clear the infection thus not having to remove/damage the crown or bridge as that can be costly. Go to another dentist or a dental surgeon if you can and get a second opinion.I was treated for a dental abscess when I was 6 months pregnant as a emergency procedure, then 4 months later I was retreated and got a crown on top of this tooh, after 6 months it got infected again!!:mad: how can that would be possible?:confused: somebody have an idea? I think it is the dentist fault for bad treatment, I do not know what to do, he send me to the endodontist and 2 weeks of ATB but all this it is a lot of pain, more money, time and frustration.Advices?:(
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
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