Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Vomiting dark green, blackish bile, back pain, but no fever??

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 14 Replies
  • Posted By: LaurynL
  • December 18, 2007
  • 04:25 PM

I've been vomiting since around 7:30 last night, and the nausea started around 2. I figured I was just nauseous and I didn't think anything of it. So I went to work at 5:30 pm and started becoming extremely nauseous, so bad that I couldn't talk to customers so I told my manager and she let me go home. The instant I got home, I started vomiting. The first time it was food, the second time it was dry-heaving, the third-fifth time it was dry-heaving, mucus, and yellow bile, and the sixth and seventh time (which were while my fiance and I were in bed), I vomited dark green bile (almost looked black). He keeps saying it's the stomach flu, but I have no fever. Although, I do have a lot of pain in my lower and middle back. I didn't know if that was from bending over and vomiting last night, though. I also can't think of anything I could've eaten that was bad. Please help me, I can't find anything that fits the symptoms. Thank you!

Reply Flag this Discussion

14 Replies:

  • The eighth time (just now), it was just dry-heaving. Please help, I have no way of getting to a doctor right now if it's something serious, my fiance took our vehicle to work. Thanks to all those that will reply
    LaurynL 3 Replies
    • December 18, 2007
    • 04:39 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Do you have stomach cramping? or diarrhea. If so, I would think food poisoning. But get a friend to deliver some Gator-Aid or have a drug store deliver it. Your doc can call in a script for a drug called compazine which you can take by pill or suppository. (great for when you can't keep anything down). Don't get dehydrated if possible and call someone if you start getting weird thoughts or dizziness. Sorry you didn't get a fast answer to your problem. Does your local hospital have Ask-a-Nurse service or your biggest pharmacies or hospitals have urgent care clinics?
    rad-skw 1,605 Replies
    • December 19, 2007
    • 11:26 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • No, no diahrrea. My stomach kinda hurts... I had my fiance get me some pedialyte and I feel a little better. Thanks for answering =] It might've been food poisoning, it's just, of the food that I ate, it doesn't seem that any of it could've food poisoned me. Can you get a stomach virus not from food poisoning? I'm not sure... All I know is that I'm feeling better =] I couldn't even stand up yesterday. I can stand now! And I had some soup. =]
    LaurynL 3 Replies
    • December 19, 2007
    • 07:56 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Glad you are feeling better. Here's a whole lotta info about "stomach flu".Yesterday, you were enjoying a tasty meal at your favorite restaurant, and now you're doubled over with pain. These symptoms could be those of viral gastroenteritis — an intestinal infection marked by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea or vomiting, and sometimes fever.You usually develop viral gastroenteritis — often called stomach flu — after contact with an infected person or because you've ingested contaminated food or water. If you're otherwise healthy, you'll likely recover without complications. But for infants, older adults and people with compromised immune systems, viral gastroenteritis can be deadly.There's no effective treatment for viral gastroenteritis, so prevention is key. In addition to avoiding food and water that may be contaminated, thorough and frequent hand washing is your best defense.Although it's commonly called stomach flu, gastroenteritis isn't the same as influenza. Real flu (influenza) affects your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Gastroenteritis, on the other hand, attacks your intestines, causing signs and symptoms such as:Watery, usually nonbloody diarrhea. Bloody diarrhea usually means you have a different, more severe infection.Abdominal cramps and pain.Nausea, vomiting or both.Occasional muscle aches or headache.Low-grade fever.Depending on the cause, viral gastroenteritis symptoms may appear within one to three days after you're infected and can range from mild to severe. Symptoms usually last just a day or two, but occasionally they may persist as long as 10 days.Because the symptoms are similar, it's easy to confuse viral diarrhea with diarrhea caused by bacteria such as salmonella and Escherichia coli (E. coli) or parasites such as giardia.Causes You're most likely to contract viral gastroenteritis when you eat or drink contaminated food or water, or if you share utensils, towels or food with someone who's infected.Some shellfish, especially raw or undercooked oysters, can make you sick. Contaminated drinking water also can cause viral diarrhea. But in many cases, the virus is passed through the fecal-oral route — that is, someone with the virus handles food you eat without washing his or her hands after using the bathroom.A number of viruses can be the cause of gastroenteritis, including:Rotavirus. This is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in infants and children worldwide — it's also a leading cause of death among children. Every year, thousands of children are hospitalized with complications of the infection. Your child is likely to have rotavirus at least once before age 5. Children are usually infected when they put their fingers or other objects contaminated with the virus into their mouths.Adults who are infected with rotavirus usually don't develop symptoms, but can still spread the illness. Some people, particularly those in institutional settings, may spread the virus even though they don't have any symptoms of illness themselves.A vaccine against rotaviral gastroenteritis is available in some countries, including the United States, and appears to be effective in preventing severe symptoms. Talk to your doctor about whether to immunize your child.Noroviruses. There are many different strains of noroviruses, including Norwalk virus, that all cause similar symptoms. In addition to diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, you may experience muscle aches, headache, fatigue and low-grade fever.Both children and adults are affected by noroviruses. Norovirus infection can sweep through families and communities. It's especially likely to spread among people in confined spaces. In most cases you pick up the virus from contaminated food or water, although person-to-person transmission also is possible.After exposure to the virus, you're likely to feel sick within 18 to 72 hours. Most people feel better in a day or two, but you're still contagious for at least three days — and up to two weeks — after you've recovered.Risk factorsGastroenteritis occurs all over the world, affecting people of every age, race and background. In developing nations, it's a leading cause of death in children.Children in child care centers and older adults living in nursing homes are especially vulnerable. That's because children's immune systems aren't mature until about age 6, and adult immune systems tend to become less efficient later in life.Intestinal infections can flourish anywhere people congregate — from schools and dormitories to campgrounds and luxury cruise ships. Adults whose resistance is low — often because their immune systems are compromised by HIV, AIDS or other medical conditions — are especially at risk.Each gastrointestinal virus has a season when it's most active. If you live in the Northern Hemisphere, you're more likely to get rotavirus or the Norwalk virus between October and April.When to seek medical advice If you're an adult, call your doctor ifYou're not able to keep liquids down for 24 hours.You've been vomiting for more than two days.You're vomiting blood.You're dehydrated. Signs of dehydration include excessive thirst, dry mouth, deep yellow urine or little or no urine, and severe weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness.You notice blood in your bowel movements.You have a fever above 104 F.Your doctor will likely diagnose gastroenteritis based on symptoms, a physical exam and sometimes on the presence of similar cases in your community. A rapid stool test can detect rotavirus, but there are no quick tests for other viruses that cause gastroenteritis. In some cases your doctor may have you submit a stool sample to rule out a possible bacterial or parasitic infection.Complications Dehydration — a severe loss of water and essential salts and minerals — is the most common serious complication of gastroenteritis. If you're a healthy adult and drink enough to replace fluids you lose from vomiting and diarrhea, dehydration shouldn't be a problem.But infants, older adults and people with suppressed immune systems may become severely dehydrated when they lose more fluids than they can replace. In that case, they may need to be hospitalized and receive intravenous fluids. In extreme cases dehydration can be fatal.Treatment There's often no specific medical treatment for gastroenteritis. Antibiotics aren't effective against viruses, and overusing them can contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Treatment consists of self-care steps.Prevention The best way to prevent the spread of intestinal infections is to follow these common-sense precautions:Wash your hands thoroughly. It's best to use warm water and soap and to rub hands vigorously for at least 20 seconds, remembering to wash around cuticles, beneath fingernails and in the creases of the hands. Then rinse thoroughly. Carry towelettes for times when soap and water aren't available.Use separate personal items around your home. Avoid sharing eating utensils, glasses and plates. Use separate towels in the bathroom.Keep your distance. Avoid close contact with anyone who has the virus, if possible. Take precautions when travelingWhen you're traveling in other countries, you can become sick from contaminated food or water. To help reduce your risk:Drink only well-sealed bottled or carbonated water.Avoid ice cubes, because ice cubes may be made from contaminated water. Use bottled water to brush your teeth.Avoid raw food — including peeled fruits, raw vegetables and salads — that has been touched by human hands.Avoid undercooked meat and fish.Get vaccinated. A vaccine against gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus is available in some countries, including the United States, and appears to be effective in preventing severe symptoms of this illness.Self-care To help keep yourself more comfortable and prevent dehydration while you recover, try the following:Let your stomach settle. Stop eating and drinking for a few hours.Try sucking on ice chips or taking small sips of water. You might also try drinking clear soda such as 7UP or Sprite, clear broths, or noncaffeinated sports drinks such as Gatorade. Affected adults should try to drink plenty of liquid every day, taking small, frequent sips.Ease back into eating. Gradually begin to eat bland, easy-to-digest foods such as soda crackers, toast, gelatin, bananas, rice and chicken. Stop eating if your nausea returns.Avoid certain foods and substances until you feel better. These include dairy products, caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, and fatty or highly seasoned foods.Get plenty of rest. The illness and dehydration may have made you weak and tired.Be cautious with medications. Use medications such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) sparingly, if at all. They can make your stomach more upset. Use acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) cautiously. It sometimes can cause liver toxicity, especially in children.
    rad-skw 1,605 Replies
    • December 20, 2007
    • 11:57 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Thanks so much!! That helped a lot, I really appreciate it... Thanks so much for the info =]=]
    LaurynL 3 Replies
    • December 21, 2007
    • 06:17 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • A liver cleanse using possibly dandelion root as tea being strong enough. would that fix a bile-liver vomit doc?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 23, 2008
    • 04:48 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I've been vomiting since around 7:30 last night, and the nausea started around 2. I figured I was just nauseous and I didn't think anything of it. So I went to work at 5:30 pm and started becoming extremely nauseous, so bad that I couldn't talk to customers so I told my manager and she let me go home. The instant I got home, I started vomiting. The first time it was food, the second time it was dry-heaving, the third-fifth time it was dry-heaving, mucus, and yellow bile, and the sixth and seventh time (which were while my fiance and I were in bed), I vomited dark green bile (almost looked black). He keeps saying it's the stomach flu, but I have no fever. Although, I do have a lot of pain in my lower and middle back. I didn't know if that was from bending over and vomiting last night, though. I also can't think of anything I could've eaten that was bad. Please help me, I can't find anything that fits the symptoms. Thank you!Gallstones?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 11, 2009
    • 04:32 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I've been vomiting since around 7:30 last night, and the nausea started around 2. I figured I was just nauseous and I didn't think anything of it. So I went to work at 5:30 pm and started becoming extremely nauseous, so bad that I couldn't talk to customers so I told my manager and she let me go home. The instant I got home, I started vomiting. The first time it was food, the second time it was dry-heaving, the third-fifth time it was dry-heaving, mucus, and yellow bile, and the sixth and seventh time (which were while my fiance and I were in bed), I vomited dark green bile (almost looked black). He keeps saying it's the stomach flu, but I have no fever. Although, I do have a lot of pain in my lower and middle back. I didn't know if that was from bending over and vomiting last night, though. I also can't think of anything I could've eaten that was bad. Please help me, I can't find anything that fits the symptoms. Thank you!Just because you don't have a fever doesn't mean it's not Stomach Flu. Influenza is a virus and viral infections don't necessarily cause fevers. You get fevers because your body is trying to kill the invading microbes by overheating them.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 20, 2011
    • 08:26 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • LaurynL.. So what medication were you taking to help you feel better??
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 27, 2011
    • 09:03 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I've been vomiting since around 7:30 last night, and the nausea started around 2. I figured I was just nauseous and I didn't think anything of it. So I went to work at 5:30 pm and started becoming extremely nauseous, so bad that I couldn't talk to customers so I told my manager and she let me go home. The instant I got home, I started vomiting. The first time it was food, the second time it was dry-heaving, the third-fifth time it was dry-heaving, mucus, and yellow bile, and the sixth and seventh time (which were while my fiance and I were in bed), I vomited dark green bile (almost looked black). He keeps saying it's the stomach flu, but I have no fever. Although, I do have a lot of pain in my lower and middle back. I didn't know if that was from bending over and vomiting last night, though. I also can't think of anything I could've eaten that was bad. Please help me, I can't find anything that fits the symptoms. Thank you!I have the exact same symptoms right now. I have a strong hunch that it is glandular fever as I've had it before. The biggest sign of this is the acheing muscles but I also have no yearning for food and feel like every task is going to be far too much effort. Have you been to your doctor yet? What did he / she say?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have EXACT same symptoms. To a "T". I too am stuck at home alone. I know this is an old thread but please let me know if you ever figured it out! THanks , Valentine
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Complications of Crohn’s Disease

    Recognize the risks associated with Crohn’s disease.

    8 Surprising Facts About Cholesterol

    Did you know that one in six US adults has high cholesterol?

  • the same has been happening to me i went to the er an they said i have golbstones
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Did you take pepto bismal for your nausea? That causes Black Bile-like vomit
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I also had the same exact symptoms two nights ago.(Vomiting, diarrhea, back pain, NO FEVER) I thought it was food poisoning from indian food that we ate the night before, but no one else got sick. It lasted about 8 hours. Now my girlfriend has the same symptoms so I am assuming its contagious (or she is getting food poisoning from the same indian food three days after eating it) . Any ideas would be helpful.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.
Advertisement

Safe Sex With Hepatitis C

Prevent the spread of the hepatitis C virus.

Preventing Lung Infections

With COPD, it’s important to protect your lungs.

8 Health Dangers of Depression

Unmanaged depression can take a toll on your physical health.

Food Choices for Diabetes

What, when and how much you eat affects your blood sugar.

6 Exercises for Multiple Sclerosis

Ease your way into these stretching and strengthening moves,

Advertisement