Discussions By Condition: Hip conditions

Labrum Tear & pain

Posted In: Hip conditions 52 Replies
  • Posted By: vagator81
  • December 12, 2007
  • 01:55 AM

I've been diagnosed with a labrum tear of the left hip and have had associated hip and groin pain. I am also having nerve type pain down my leg. Lately this pain has traveled further down the leg. An MRI of my lumbar spine indicated some mild degenerative stuff but no stenosis. I"m wondering if the nerve type pain down my leg can be caused by the labrum tear. I saw an orthropedic surgeon today and he thinks the hip and leg issues are seperate problems and said I should pick which to work on first. He thinks my hip will need to be scoped either way. So I need to decide whether to have surgery on the hip first or start PT and pain shots for the back problem that doesn't show up on MRI. Does anyone have any advice? Could the labrum tear cause me to stand, walk, sit differently that would cause pain like scatica down my leg? I guess I'm hoping if I get scoped it will fix both issues.

Reply Flag this Discussion

52 Replies:

  • No responses yet but my surgeon and I decided to have surgery for the labrum tear and then work on the other issues. :confused:
    vagator81 12 Replies
    • December 18, 2007
    • 07:34 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • No responses yet but my surgeon and I decided to have surgery for the labrum tear and then work on the other issues. :confused: Is the pain down your leg along the outside, inside or back of your leg? Have you tried acupuncture to help you with this pain? I highly recommend acupuncture both before and after your scheduled surgery. It will help tremendously. Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3,080 Replies
    • December 18, 2007
    • 08:04 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Vagator81,I am nearly 5 weeks post-op hip arthroscopy with repair of labral tear and removal of bone spurs. I had experienced a lot of the symptoms you describe. The pain shooting down the leg...for me..started in the hip, ran down the outside of the thigh and would frequently go to the inside of the leg at the knee. I was told the cause of this was a tight "IT Band"...Iliotibial band (?sp) and also a tight psoas muscle. Both of these problems occured because my gate was altered due to the internal derrangements of my hip.I can report that the deep aching pain in the joint was gone immediately post-op. Prior to surgery, I could never escape the deep aching... whether standing, sitting or lying down. Also, the pain in the groin is gone.The post-op recovery isn't as easy as other scope procedures, such as knee arthroscopy. I was required to use crutches for 4 weeks with no weight bearing on the operative side. I am walking now without any assistive devices. I have some range of motion limitations due to scar tissue formation...which should resolve over time with range of motion exercises. There is a fair amount of atrophy in the muscles...so endurance for walking is limited.Godd Luck,Wayne
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 8, 2008
    • 07:49 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Sandman (Wayne) - thanks for the response. I had a nerve conduction test and also have a slight pinching of a nerve that may be causing some of the pain down my leg. I'm wondering if it is all related to an injury (I don't remember it) that caused my labrum tear. I'm being operated on the labrum tear on the 18th. Hopefully the recovery won't be too bad. Were you able to get around okay? Did the pain lower down you leg go away or are your muscles still tight? Thanks - Dennis acuann - the pain is on the side and front of the leg. I have not tried acupuncture. I'm not sure I want to try something until after the surgery. Thanks for your response
    vagator81 12 Replies
    • January 11, 2008
    • 08:31 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Dennis,I had absolutely no preconceived notions of what my recovery would be like. I guess perhaps I was very naive about the whole situation. Recovery, especially for the first week, was very taxing to me. I have a two story house and have never had to use crutches..... my bedroom is on the second floor. I was on strict orders of no weight bearing on the operative side for four weeks. This posed challenges to other activities of daily living as well.My activity level has gone up dramatically since I was told I could start walking. I terminated use of crutches six days ago. Every day has gotten better. I tend to push the envelope a bit....as far as self rehab. I've found that I formed a significant amout of adhesions in the joint and to deal with them....well, you stretch until they tear....not terribly comfortable ( but if you don't break them up...you get a frozen joint). There is a fair amount of muscle atrophy and stiffness from lack of use. One nagging problem that I was not informed of preoperatively....was compression injury of nerves...which I'm still bothered by. I have numbness on the tops of both feet and in my groin traveling back to my tail bone. They pull on your legs during the surgery....on a special table....to open the joint space. Counter traction is accomplished by having a large padded cylinder attached to the table that is positioned between your legs. I was in this position for six hours.....due to the extensive nature of the damage to my joint.Regardless of my experiences and minimal post-op complications. I would say I'm extremely pleased with the results. I can sit, stand and especially sleep without the deep aching I had in my hip and groin and I have no impingement of the joint since the tear has been secured. This relief was immediate...and I really didn't require much oral pain medication. I think in another week or two....I should be back to my normal self.If you have a high degree of confidence in your surgeon...I'd say go for it. I feel it has been an amazing experience....especially since I was told that if my pain hadn't imrpoved after the arthroscopy, I would require an artificial hip....I'm 42 and like to be active...so that option wasn't appealing to me at all.Good luck....Let me know how it goes for you...I'm hoping you have even greater success in your surgical outcome!Wayne
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 12, 2008
    • 04:54 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Wayne, Thanks again - I've been wondering about the post-op recovery of this. I live in a townhome and the bedroom is on the thrid floor. I have an aerobed on the first floor - just in case I need it, though. I'm hoping to go back to work fairly quickly. I have never used crutches either. Was it hard to get used to them? Your information is very helpful. Thanks - Dennis
    vagator81 12 Replies
    • January 13, 2008
    • 03:35 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Dennis: Getting adjusted to using crutches took a couple of days.....for use on the ground floor. Negotiating stairs...took perhaps a week. What I found...was the situation was very taxing on my good leg, pecs and triceps. Just taking my daily shower in the morning used a lot of energy. Then there was the task of getting dressed and using the rest room. Things that I might recommend to you....1) a shower chair...if your shower can accomodate. 2) an elevated seat for your toilet. 3) Perhaps consider sleeping on your ground floor for the first several days...if not a week. 4) I found it most comfortable to have a five inch thick pad placed on top of my couch...it raised my seating position which assisted with getting up and I was able to sit in a semi reclined position...so less pressure on the hip. I also required assistance in putting my sock on...the affected side...it just wouldn't/couldn't bend enough for me to get it on until about week 4. As far as work goes...that will probably be between you and your doctor. I'll have been off of work for eight weeks total before I'll be allowed to go back. I certainly don't think that will have been too long for my job. I could not tolerate sitting in a regular chair until week 3. I started to drive the second week post-op...very challenging thing. It was extremely difficult and painful as my leg was still swollen and stiff and very painful if pushed too far. So, depending on your job.... Hope some of this is helpful to you. Good Luck!! If there is anything else I can help you with regarding the hip arthroscopy....just let me know. Wayne
    Sandman 14 Replies
    • January 13, 2008
    • 04:36 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Again, I cannot emphasize enough how helpful acupuncture is in helping the body heal after surgery. It is brilliant for pain and helps promote healing of the tissues and joints. Another good option is to take a fairly high dose of systemic enzymes - protease, amylase, lipase, etc...as this helps fight inflammation and also promotes healing. Google enzymes and inflammation for more info. I have a patient with a congenital knee disorder. He has had 7 surgeries on his left knee. He has found acupuncture to be very helpful and it has improved his ROM(range of motion) and greatly decreased his pain. My mom, age 77, broke her hip three years ago and had surgery. The docs were absolutely amazed at how quickly and how well she healed. Her secret? Acupuncture and chinese herbs...it works! DOM
    acuann 3,080 Replies
    • January 13, 2008
    • 09:27 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Dom, I couldn't agree more with you. I have personally witnessed the benefit in peoples health through "Alternative Medicine." I would really like that term to be changed to "Real Medicine"...since these forms allow the body to heal itself and they've been around since the beginning of time. My only regret....I don't have anyone in my area, that I'm aware of, that could have helped me with accupuncture. I have been taking Glucosamine/Chondroitin, MSM and few grams of Vitamin C. This combo has really seemed to help me. I don't share this info. as a medical recommendation. I simply like people to know that there are things out there other than prescription drugs...I.E. Cox-2 inhibitors, NSAIDS and even oral narcotics. Thanks again for pointing out accupuncture and its benefits. Thanks for helping others. Take Care, Wayne
    Sandman 14 Replies
    • January 14, 2008
    • 01:48 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • my experience .... in August 2007 I had hip arthoscopic surgery. all tests showed I had a minor labrum tear (left hip) i am 18 years old and a dancer and the injury was discovered when i woke up the next day from a long day of dance and every time i stepped i felt like my hamstring was going to snap. wen through tons and tons of PT. No one could answer why it hurt so bad. I actually pushed the issue telling the doctor i know what is wrong. All along i was right my Labrum was torn. But it was not till i went to Hospitals for Special Surgeries in the NYC and saw Dr. Coleman. He said your labrum only tears where there is an underlying problem. My problem was my tip of my femur was not perfectly shaped so it didnt rest in my socket comfortably. After almost a year of being out of dance and all activites we finally persueded surgery and they fixed my femur so it would fit and stiched the cartilage up. It explains why in dance i could never turn my left leg out fully and there was always a presure feeling and it always felt like something was holding it back. The doctor also said if i were not dancing the tear prolly wouldnt have happened becuase i wouldnt be putting the same stresses on my hip. I went to physical therapy after surgery a while and immeadiatly so results. and i now am back to dancing and feel AMAZING. Thats my story!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 24, 2008
    • 05:54 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • pc89, That's absolutely wonderful news....The great results that you had from your surgery. I had similar problems moving my left hip before the torn labrum...but for me..I couldn't rotate my left hip very well to do side kicks in Tae Kwon Do. My doctor had to remove alot of bone...as well as fix the Labrum. I tore the Labrum in a bicycle crash last May. I think the doctors were skeptical about anything being wrong in the joint....so it took over seven months to get to the point of surgery. Thanks for sharing your story....It's very encouraging to hear such positive results from the surgery. Take Care, Wayne
    Sandman 14 Replies
    • January 24, 2008
    • 00:44 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Complications of Crohn’s Disease

    Recognize the risks associated with Crohn’s disease.

    8 Surprising Facts About Cholesterol

    Did you know that one in six US adults has high cholesterol?

  • I am new to this forum and have read the earlier posts with much interest. I just had a right hip arthroscopy with debridement on 1/16/08. The doc indicated the labral tear was larger than expected based on the MRI and another cartilage tear was detected and repaired during the procedure.While my hip is still sore, I have not experienced any of the clicking/popping that occurred pre-op. My problem and concern is that the pre-op pain in my lower left back (si joint) and left hip has not gone away. It is triggered by sitting and relieved by bed rest. This has been going on for over two years and I was extremely hopefully that the arthroscopy would address all of the pain, especially while sitting. Perhaps my pelvis is so out of whack based on the labral tear and will only be relieved through PT and time.Let me know if anyone has experienced similar issues and/or has any suggestions. I have to believe everything is related to the labral tear and arthroscopic procedure but you never know.Thanks,Tom
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 24, 2008
    • 07:23 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Tom,Speaking from my own experience, being I'm not a physician, I too have some of the other issues that existed before the surgery. For me, I continue to have a snapping of my patella (knee cap) due to a tight I.T. Band...connective tissue on the outside of the thigh. Now that I've been able to walk for almost three weeks...I'm noticing pain from the buttox around the hip from a tight psoas muscle.My specific problems listed above directly correlate to my messed up gate for all these months. I guess I limped pretty dramatically...but didn't even realize it. As a result...I did shift my pelvis a fair amount and I have no doubt that'll have to be corrected with P.T.I would suspect what you've described is similar to what I'm experiencing. And perhaps it is due to changes you made in your walking that is causing you problems.Important thing is to get the Labrum squared away...I've been told that these are a pretty big source for joint degeneration / arthritis requiring a total hip replacement.Hope this helps...wish there were more discussions about this surgery. I sure wished I had a few questions answered before I had my surgery.Hope you have a speedy and complete recovery,Wayne
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 25, 2008
    • 01:36 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Tom, There might be a second post from me on this...forgot my screen name...too many sites. Anyway, I can comment on my own experience...since I'm not a physician and can't comment on others. I've been allowed to walk now for about 3 weeks. Some of the old symptoms have returned. Specifically the snapping of my patella (knee cap) and some pain that radiates from the buttox to around the hip. The snapping is from a tight I.T. band and my pain is from a tight psoas muscle. These were present before the surgery because I had altered the way I walked. I have been told I had a significant limp prior to surgery.....although I couldn't necessarily agree unless I was paying attention. I expect this to be resolved once I start my P.T. I would think there would be a chance that you have a similar underlying situation such as my own...again I'm not a physician. But I would think you probably altered the way you walked which has thrown things out of alignment. Hopefully this thread will help others....I wish I had found some information prior to my surgery....I would have then known a little of what to expect. Hope this helps...hope you have a speedy and full recovery! Wayne
    Sandman 14 Replies
    • January 25, 2008
    • 00:41 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Wayne,Thanks for the follow up. During PT yesterday, the therapist said I have a left posterior rotation with upslip and suspects it is because I was favoring my left side due to the right hip labral tear. All I know is the left side pain didn't exist before I started to experience the right hip pain so they're most likely related. Problem is it took two years to find out I had a labral tear so undoing things is probably going to take time. Tom
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 25, 2008
    • 07:55 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Tom, Good luck with the P.T. it certainly sounds like you're on to something. I think it is probably the case that it might take some time to get things in order. Especially since you've changed the way you walked for two years. I think they'll probably have to get muscles to relax...get others strengthened...but I think the hardest thing is re-establishing muscle memory. I'm struggling right now with the limp that I developed with all of this....it's subconscious so I now have to concentrate on the mechanics of walking properly. Ayway, now that you have information regarding your situation...you can do something about it. It's a whole lot easier dealing with these issues once you have information. Take Care, Wayne
    Sandman 14 Replies
    • January 27, 2008
    • 03:01 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I had Labral Debridement surgery 3 years ago. The surgery left me with torn glutes (from the dislocation of the joint necessary on the fracture table), a noticeable leg length discrepancy on the operative leg, scar tissue in the glutes, and catching in the groin area.After obtaining a second opinion, I was told that the only relief from the glute pain with be yoga, deep tissue massage, and chiropractics to keep the femoral head from continually slipping forward. There is no cure once you have a near, total labral debridement. My future outlook was eventual osteoarthritis, due to lack of cushioning between the femoral head and hip socket.Running, bowling, racquetball, step aerobics, and standing for long periods of time (in excess of 4 hours) destabilize the operative hip, and cause swelling in the hip capsule. Think office work and no-impact activities like swimming or whatever machine does not cause groin or glute pain. If you have less than 50% tear...please do the PT and forget the surgery. In the out-years, it is not the permanent solution. Most ortho docs don't tell you this though. Sorry - but you should know before you get on the table.T
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 29, 2008
    • 05:48 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • T, I'm sorry to hear that you had negative results from your surgery...It serves to illustrate that no surgical intervention comes with a 100% guarantee. For myself, I was sent to two different, very reputable P.T. departments for evaluation and treatment. Both times I was referred back to the Orthopod because of ongoing impingement issues. I had no alternative other than surgical intervention. I can say that....seven weeks post-op and I'm extremely pleased. I can sit, walk and most importantly...sleep without any pain. My hip doesn't lock in unusual positions at the drop of a hat. I'm not saying it hasn't been a struggle...I seem to have ongoing nerve injury / damage issues as a result of the traction-countertraction from the fracture table. The deterioration of my hip was such that every aspect of my life was altered. This weighed heavily on my mind before deciding to have surgery. I think it is prudent for every individual to assess the pros and cons of going through with such a procedure. As people can see from your experience...the situation can turn out more negative than one would hope. I share my experience...because I searched and found little information from people post operatively and I feel that my surgery is turning out to be a positive experience. Had I had viable alternatives...I would have sought them. If I let the condition continue to deteriorate...I would have been facing a total joint replacement. I illustrate my optimism with the fact that yesterday...I was able to spin for 30 minutes and have an otherwise very productive workout. Prior to surgery, I could spin for maybe 5 minutes. I enjoy being active and I have renewed optimism for my future...although I'm going to sell my road bicycle to eliminate any risk of another crash....Stationary bikes are my future! Again, T, thank you for your input. It takes personal strength to share what you're going through. People need to hear the truth about surgical procedures so they can make educated decisions regarding their healthcare and with your input....they get a more complete look at the procedure. Take Care, Wayne
    Sandman 14 Replies
    • January 30, 2008
    • 00:22 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Wayne,Did you have any pre-op pain with sitting and did it go away after the surgery? I'm confident that my hip will recover but not being able to sit for more than 10 minutes is driving me nuts. I'm hoping the PT will help but I'm not convinced the therapist understands the source. If I knew why I'm having problems with sitting, I would have a decent chance of fixing the problem. So far, after two years, no one has come up with the answer. Let me know if you have any thoughts.Thanks,Tom
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • February 3, 2008
    • 03:58 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Tom,Preoperatively I had constant pain...deep within the hip and through to the groin. This pain never stopped with any position. In fact, I didn't want to sit much because this caused the fragment or flap to wedge in the joint...then I had problems straightening my leg when I wanted to stand.I'm not sure what's going on in your hip. If you had an extensive debridement...perhaps it's arthritis?? I'm not a doctor...so, it's just an uneducated guess. What I find very helpful, for myself, is MSM, Glucosamine and Chondroitin. I worked with an Orthopedic surgeon that prescribed Glucosamine and Chondroitin to all his total joint replacement patients. He told the patients they should be on it the rest of their life. The combo I use really makes all my joints feel better.I'm still very sorry to hear that you are struggling after such a long time. So far...my hip feels 100% better...but I haven't started P.T. My Doctor says the P.T.'s are much to aggressive and would cause damage....since I had extensive work. Perhaps with P.T...I might start experiencing more pain.My only problem is the ongoing nerve damage in the tops of my feet and in the groin. My feet alternate from being tingly to prickly fire. My Doc. thinks there's a good chance I'll have normal feeling within a years time. So I guess my surgery wasn't 100% perfect.Hope you can find a resolution to your problem....chronic pain really destroys a persons life. I can see that looking back on my own life...before having my surgery.Take Care,Wayne
    Sandman 14 Replies
    • February 4, 2008
    • 01:30 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.
Advertisement

8 Health Dangers of Depression

Unmanaged depression can take a toll on your physical health.

Best Cough & Cold Meds for Kids

Help your child feel better, faster.

What HIV Positive Women Should Know About Sex

You can have sex after an HIV diagnosis.

Food Choices for Diabetes

What, when and how much you eat affects your blood sugar.

6 Exercises for Multiple Sclerosis

Ease your way into these stretching and strengthening moves,

Advertisement