Discussions By Condition: Sleep disorders

Adult sleep apnea -Tonsil removal?

Posted In: Sleep disorders 10 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • May 23, 2006
  • 01:59 PM

I have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and use a cpap machine. My ENT thinks fixing my deviated septum many help this condition. I am wondering if the removal of my tonsils and adnoids would help. I have a small throat, and my son had to have his removed as a child due to his snoring/apnea. Did anyone else have this done as an adult?

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10 Replies:

  • Yes, I had my tonsils out at 36 due to sleep apnea mainly, although I was also having a lot of throat infections and losing my voice. The surgery did help both problems, but it was quite a difficult recovery and took a long time for me to feel better. Before the surgery, I was waking myself up with my snoring often and sometimes felt like I was being choked. These sensations have pretty much disappeared, so it was definitely worth it, but a lot of thought should go into the pros and cons of your own situation. Good luck!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 7, 2006
    • 06:28 AM
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  • I had a Septoplasty, UP3 and Tonsillectomy about a month ago and I am feeling much better. I am sleeping better at night. I go for my post UP3 sleep study next Thursday to determine if I still have sleep apnea. Before the surgery, I was a horrible snorer, but now I hardly snore. I wish I hve done this a long time ago, but they did not know I needed this to help me breathe. It now feels like I have my life back.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 9, 2006
    • 01:24 PM
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  • my son experienced swelling tonsils almost every month. he is only 3 yrs. old then. i was advised by my ENT for tonsil removal because my son's tonsils is considered as stage 4 already. if tonsils be removed, what are the do's and dont's after removal? is it possible that my son will never experience tonsilitis again? or reocurrence of his tonsilitis?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 23, 2007
    • 04:05 PM
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  • I have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and use a cpap machine. My ENT thinks fixing my deviated septum many help this condition. I am wondering if the removal of my tonsils and adnoids would help. I have a small throat, and my son had to have his removed as a child due to his snoring/apnea. Did anyone else have this done as an adult?I too have sleep apnea, and my tonsils are to big, so im in the perosess of getting them removed. i guess its not a very good gurgrey for adults.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 29, 2010
    • 06:02 AM
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  • I am 37 years old and has my tonsils, uvila removed, soft palate scraped, sinuses cleaned out and deviated septum fixed all to help with my sleep apnea. I felt great after healing from all that and the snoring stopped IT WAS GREAT until this last year I started getting sick again and i was told that my snoring started coming back. Since Jan of this year so far I have had 4 sinus infections, sleep apnea is completely back now and was told 2 months ago by a new dr how irritated my tonsils were... I guess they just magically appeared because noone had noticed them before. Dr says its impossible for them to grow back like this so he wants to send me back to the ENT to possibly biopsy them. Miserable.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Respect the UPPP:The person you should be asking is a good and ethical Ears Nose and Mouth specialist.There are clear guidlines on the shape of your mouth and efficacy of the surgery. If you are not a good candidate then you shouldn't have the surgery and your doctor, imo, should ethically deny you.After saying all that, yes I have had it and out of my 5 serious surgeries in my life, nothing compares to how painful the UPPP was. It did not cure my sleep apnea but it did reduce the loudness of my snoring substantially.BTW, it was 3 weeks of horrendous pain and this may be one of those it's best to really dose with the pain killers. Me, it wasn't like real pain. you know that pain from real trauma. So as usually I'm like going off the pain killers quicker than the Rx. Soon it was the most sadistic kind of pain, like someone starved you, gave you 50 million paper cuts in your mouth and gave you salty chips and ketchup to eat.
    DejaBoo 9 Replies Flag this Response
  • My 16-year-old son had Obstructive Sleep Apnea, considered moderate (170+ Apnea incidents/night). Specialist suggested forced side sleeping, which worked occasionally, but not enough to feel better. Tonsillectomy recommended, with CPAP being last resort.ENT surgeon said up front that there was no guarantee the tonsil removal would cure the OSA. He said the success percentage is very high with kids (close to 100%) and very low with adults (less than 10% I think he said? Don't quote me on that!). Given that my son was 16, 6'2", 210 lbs, I guess it's hard to say where he fit on that kid-to-adult scale.We went ahead with the tonsillectomy, and I gotta say, it was ***l. He ended up being the only case any medical professionals have ever heard of who had 4 post-tonsillectomy hemorrages, each requiring further surgery. Five surgeries in 2 weeks, not fun, and scary as ***l for all of us. But he pulled through.Fast forward a few months, and he's slowly but surely feeling better, functioning better and has energy for the first time in a very long time. He went back in for a follow up overnight sleep study, and according to that testing, the OSA is GONE. CURED. He is one happy camper, and always says how the tonsillectomy was soooo worth it, even though it was a frightening experience. No CPAP needed here! Yay! Now we just cross our fingers that it doesn't come back eventually. BTW, while waiting for his tonsillectomy, he decided to go off gluten (not easy for a 16 year old boy), and remains off it to this day. Interestingly, he was supposed to have an adenoidectomy at the same time, but when the ENT got in there, the adenoids had shrunk down to nothing, so were not touched. It makes me wonder if the tonsils had actually shrunk too, even though they were still the size of golf balls!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • September 3, 2010
    • 07:41 AM
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  • I'm in the exact same situation. My son(5years old) had sleep apnea and snored really bad. He had his tonsils and adnedoids removed, and he's like a new boy! He doesn't snore, sleeps good, and is doing GREAT in school. Before the surgery he was diagnosed with Sensory Integration Dysfunction. He's completely cured....unbelievable! I've done 2 sleep studies that say I have apnea. I've also been diagnosed with narcolepsy with cataplexy. I'm 38 years old, I have a deviated septum as well. My psychiatrist is sending me to an ENT. She said they would remove my tonsils and adenoids too. She wore a CPAP mask for a long time and it didn't help her. She recently had to have her jaw broken and pushed back an inch to open her airway.....ONLY after seeing many docs and insisting something else was wrong. I've had a HARD time getting anyone to listen to me as well. I am praying this will help. In the last 2 years it's got so bad that I sleep at least 15, sometimes up to 19 hours a day. AND....the sleep doc wouldn't give me a mask when my breathing was 85%. I don't get it, but my life has gone down the tubes, so this is my only hope. Good luck, I'd love to hear if it helps you!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and use a cpap machine. My ENT thinks fixing my deviated septum many help this condition. I am wondering if the removal of my tonsils and adnoids would help. I have a small throat, and my son had to have his removed as a child due to his snoring/apnea. Did anyone else have this done as an adult?Yes! I had severe obstructive sleep apnea and I was miserable all of the time because of the lack of sleep. I tried using a cpap and could never fall asleep with it. I even tried taking a sleeping pill and using it and I still couldn't fall asleep with that mask on my face. So after much consideration I wnet to an ENT and he said that my tonsils were huge, that I needed them removed, that I needed my adnoids removed as well, that I had a deviated septum, and that I had so much build up of thick muchus in my nasal cavities...they were all blocked up. He also suggested that I have a uvulaplasty done to help with the obstruction in the back of my throat. I was scared to death because of all of the horror stories that I heard about these surgeries and also that sometimes they were not effective in treating sleep apnea. After much prayer and consideration I decided to have the surgeries. I had a tonsilectomy, adnoidectomy, septoplasty, uvulaplasty, turbinade reduction, deviated septum fixed, and irrigation of sinus cavities. It truly was the best thing I could have done. I have had absolutely no complications. The recovery took about 3 weeks, but was not unbearable as everyone said it would be. It was annoying but I took my meds and I rested and it really wasn't all that bad. I no longer have any sleep apnea at all! It truly has helped me so much....I don't fall asleep all of the time and I feel safer now that I know im not going to fall asleep at the wheel or have a heart attack one night in my sleep. I would definately recommend having surgery if you feel like you have exhausted every other option. Good Luck!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I started dating my current girl friend right when she turned 18. The first night we spent together she passed out asleep and would sit up in bed and violently kick her arms and legs like she was possesed. I quickly realized she was doing this all in her sleep and made a device she could prop her mouth open to prevent all this untill we could get doctors to fix it. As it turned out she needed to have her tonsils and adnoids removed. They quickly scheduled her for emergency surgery, it was like a few days after the consult.They gassed her to put her in twilight but because of her tonsils choking her she was trying to tell the anesthesiologist that she couldn't breath but it appeard that he just ignored her and got up and walked out of the room as she was trying to tell him this. She passed out and they performed the surgery, and I have to tell you it was a huge success. She has no more OSA at all, and no more fits of sitting up in bed. We will never know how much of her life that she was like that.Anyhow, she is grossly obese and loves to sleep on her back. She will snore about 1/2 the time but when she does it almost never very loud. She hardly NEVER snores on her sides. The sad part is that she probably went through this for so many years that it appears to have programmed her mind to think she is still in panic mode. Sometimes she breaths hard when she is sleeping and her body will **** with her breaths, but the sad part is that its like she just can't get enough sleep. She can sleep 12 hours a day and still be tired. She also has RLS. She rubbed a hole in my bed sheet. It appears that her mind is still wired to believe that she isn't sleeping but she is. She falls asleep in a good time, usually before me, and she lightly snores and it looks like everything is good. I can only hope that one day her mind lets her get good sleep. She is still way better off than she was though.
    itsthetooth 2 Replies
    • January 31, 2013
    • 04:23 AM
    • 0
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