Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Shortness of breath, abdominal swelling

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 3 Replies
  • Posted By: rnr8_2_80
  • October 16, 2007
  • 07:56 PM

I am 42 and female. I walk one hour daily and hike twice weekly for two hours. I can run and am in peak cardiovascular health. I woke up six weeks ago with shortness of breath, unquenchable thirst and was put in ICU. My potassium was very low, my blood sugar was 240 and I had an irregular ECG. They used nitroglycerine at first thinking it was my heart. But my abdomen is swollen and tender under my upper right rib cage and my lymph glands under my arms and pelvic areas were swollen initially. I don't think I had a fever.

Since that time, my labwork has all come back normal. My gallbladder ultrasound was normal though I still have tenderness around the liver area. I have returned to my regular routine of walking but have had one other episode of the original symptoms. My chiropractor today examined me and said that my right kidney area reflected a tenderness that could have been referred, and that palpation of the kidney suggested that it was swollen.

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3 Replies:

  • massive water intake could cause low sodium? thats about all i can think of. thusfor bringing up the question: how much water do you drink daily?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 16, 2007
    • 07:58 PM
    • 0
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  • Hypokalemia (POTASSIUM LEVELS LOW) can result from one or more of the following medical conditions:Perhaps the most obvious cause is insufficient consumption of potassium (that is, a low-potassium diet). However, without excessive potassium loss from the body, this is a rare cause of hypokalemia.A more common cause is excessive loss of potassium, often associated with excess water loss, which "flushes" potassium out of the body. Typically, this is a consequence of vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive perspiration.Certain medications can accelerate the removal of potassium from the body; including thiazide diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide; loop diuretics, such as furosemide; as well as various laxatives. The antifungal amphotericin B has also been associated with hypokalemia.A special case of potassium loss occurs with diabetic ketoacidosis. In addition to urinary losses from polyuria and volume contraction, there is also obligate loss of potassium from kidney tubules as a cationic partner to the negatively charged ketone, β-hydroxybutyrate.Hypomagnesemia can cause hypokalemia. Magnesium is required for adequate processing of potassium. This may become evident when hypokalemia persists despite potassium supplementation. Other electrolyte abnormalities may also be present.Disease states that lead to abnormally high aldosterone levels can cause hypertension and excessive urinary losses of potassium. These include renal artery stenosis and tumors (generally non-malignant) of the adrenal glands. Hypertension and hypokalemia can also be seen with a deficiency of the 11β-hydroxylase enzyme which allows cortisols to stimulate aldosterone receptors. This deficiency can either be congenital or caused by consumption of glycyrrhizin, which is contained in extract of licorice, sometimes found in Herbal supplements, candies and chewing tobacco.Rare hereditary defects of renal salt transporters, such as Bartter syndrome or Gitelman syndrome can cause hypokalemia, in a manner similar to that of diuretics.Rare hereditary defects of muscular ion channels and transporters that cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis can precipitate occasional attacks of severe hypokalemia and muscle weakness. These defects cause a heightened sensitivity to catechols and/or insulin and/or thyroid hormone that lead to sudden influx of potassium from the extracellular fluid into the muscle cells.Some of these are related to insulin, and hyperglycemia (HIGH BLOOD SUGAR)
    rad-skw 1,605 Replies
    • October 17, 2007
    • 09:47 AM
    • 0
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  • Diarrea could cause low sodium and other electrolyte imbalances.So can many other diseases.Please see rads post below. It explains it pretty well imo.massive water intake could cause low sodium? thats about all i can think of. thusfor bringing up the question: how much water do you drink daily?
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 17, 2007
    • 05:11 PM
    • 0
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