Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Mycoplasma- The Cause Of Your Dis-ease

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 7 Replies
  • Posted By: mommy cat
  • September 25, 2007
  • 10:30 PM

Did any of you know that the USA has patents on mycoplasma?

Here is a link regarding mycoplasma fermentans, one of the biggest culprits of diseases today.


http://www.google.com/patents?id=QEQJAAAAEBAJ&dq=5242820

Have any of you tested positive for mycoplasma? If so, were you tested for ALL species of it?

responses welcome. mommy cat

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7 Replies:

  • Another US patent involving incognitus strain...yet this stuff doesn't exist?Yeah, neither do chemtrails... http://www.google.com/patents?id=qrQcAAAAEBAJ&dq=5242820 see for yourselves. mommy cat
    mommy cat 1,654 Replies
    • September 25, 2007
    • 10:33 PM
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  • While it is still not known what causes CFS, FMS, and MCS, we are hearing of reports that a very high number (75-80%) test positive for a pathogenic form of the organism called Mycoplasma. While there are several species of this organism, most of us have been found to have active infections in our bodies of the Mycoplasma fermentans (incognitus), Mycoplasma penetrans, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae types. These organisms are a pathogenic form of Mycoplasma which are very slow-growing, invasive into deeper parts of the body (i.e., brain, central and peripheral nervous system, muscles and joints, bone marrow, gastrointestinal system, lungs and heart, and the immune system, itself), and are very difficult to treat. These are the same organisms that have been found in AIDS patients and Gulf War Syndrome patients. Those who test positive for active infection with a Mycoplasma are realizing a tremendous improvement &/or recovery in their health with appropriate antibiotic treatment. This treatment is long term (1-2 years of continuous antibiotics). tial segment of the treatment can be difficult and the continuous antibiotic dose is very harsh on the body. Many people with CFIDS are concerned (and some are even frightened) to take antibiotics for prolonged periods of time.( I highly suggest NAET/BioSET and natural supplements instead of AB therapy) However, years of medical experience in the use of antibiotics to treat chronic infectious conditions such as rheumatic fever, acne, recurrent ear infections, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, bronchiectasis, and others, have not revealed any consistent dire consequences as a result of such medications. Indeed, the very real consequences of untreated, chronic persistent infection with Mycoplasma can be far worse than the potential consequences of this treatment. If you begin treatment, it is recommended that you be monitored closely by a knowledgeable physician.
    mommy cat 1,654 Replies
    • September 25, 2007
    • 10:45 PM
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  • The information trail started with Garth and Nancy Nicolson. Their daughter returned from the Gulf War with an unexplained illness. She was unable to continue her studies at college, and moved back home. Soon after, her parents both became ill with the same symptoms. Medical tests revealed nothing abnormal, but they all continued to worsen. Fortunately for them, however, the Nicolson's were molecular pathologists with an entire research laboratory at their disposal. The Nicolson's drew blood and tissue samples >from themselves and their daughter, and set the research team, to work.
    mommy cat 1,654 Replies
    • September 25, 2007
    • 10:46 PM
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  • Garth Nicolson Ph.D. is a professor and former chairman of the Department of Tumor Biology at the University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. He is also a professor of Internal Medicine, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Texas Medical School. He has published over 500 scientific and medical papers, has edited 13 books, he is the current editor of two scientific and medical journals. Dr. Nicolson has been nominated for the Nobel Prize in cell microbiology, is among the 100 most cited researchers in the world, and sits on the board of the American Association of Cancer Research. Nancy Nicolson, Ph.D. was president of the Rhodon Foundation for Biomedical Research. She, also, has published numerous scientific papers and was a professor in the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine.
    mommy cat 1,654 Replies
    • September 25, 2007
    • 10:47 PM
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  • What they found was a living Mycoplasma pathogen. In order to find this organism, they had to break open the leukocytes (white blood cells), and perform a specific test called a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) of the DNA of the organism. Nancy also perfected another test, called Gene Tracking, which confirms the PCR results. To gather more information, they then started testing other GWI patients. What they found was that approximately 50% were positive for the live organism. The Nicolson's then researched treatment options and found a number of antibiotics that were effective against the organism. (2) After a lengthy course of antibiotics, they recovered. But, the word was out, and requests for testing of GWI patients kept coming in to the lab. They were inundated! As their evidence mounted, they published their data (3) (4) (5) and testified before the President's Panel on Gulf War Illnesses. (6) Then the connection was made by the government of the similarities between GWI and CFIDS. (7) By this time, the Nicolson's lab was already running tests of those with CFIDS---with the same results-- approximately 50% positive! Garth and Nancy Nicolson even wrote an article for the CFIDS Chronicle outlining the diagnosis and treatment of GWI/CFIDS. (8)
    mommy cat 1,654 Replies
    • September 25, 2007
    • 10:49 PM
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  • Mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest organism known. They are not new. They were discovered over 100 years ago and evolved from bacteria. The "garden variety" mycoplasma is not usually associated with severe diseases. (13) However, sometime over the past 30 years, the organism has been altered to become more lethal. The Mycoplasmas found by the Nicolson's, in their lab, contain unusual gene sequences that were probably inserted into the Mycoplasma by a specific laboratory procedure. This discovery has led them to conclude that the new forms of mycoplasma were specifically engineered for germ warfare. (9) In it's laboratory evolution, the Mycoplasmas have became more invasive, more difficult to find, and capable of causing severe diseases in humans. Diseases, like Gulf War Illness, CFS, FMS, MCS, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and AIDS, for instance.
    mommy cat 1,654 Replies
    • September 25, 2007
    • 10:52 PM
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  • Mycoplasma Origin. It has 482 genes coding for enzymes about 400 amino acids long on average, each enzyme must have a precise sequence to function properly. There are 20 different types of amino acid that occur in enzymes. Even if only 10 units had to be exactly right in each enzyme, the chance of getting the full set by ordinary random chemical combinations is one in 106271 (one followed by 6271 zeroes). This is effectively nil when one realises that the number of atoms in the universe is only about 1080 (one followed by 80 zeroes). Some evolutionists try to explain away these odds by invoking natural selection, but this requires self-reproducing entities to start with, so they cannot explain their origin:confused:
    mommy cat 1,654 Replies
    • September 25, 2007
    • 10:55 PM
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