Discussions By Condition: Leg conditions

Weeping Leg

Posted In: Leg conditions 3 Replies
  • Posted By: Sesher
  • March 7, 2007
  • 08:52 PM

My sister who is 65 years of age is experiencing a condition on her legs where they "weep" blood. It is not open sores but rather seems to "weep"
blood from small holes in the skin. The condition is chronic and her legs are deep purple and black. :confused: Her ankle is very swollen. Does anyone know of this disease? We were told it is called "Weeping Leg" however, we can find nothing about this condition. Thank you.

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3 Replies:

  • My sister who is 65 years of age is experiencing a condition on her legs where they "weep" blood. It is not open sores but rather seems to "weep"blood from small holes in the skin. The condition is chronic and her legs are deep purple and black. :confused: Her ankle is very swollen. Does anyone know of this disease? We were told it is called "Weeping Leg" however, we can find nothing about this condition. Thank you.
    Sesher 2 Replies Flag this Response
  • Yes, I have it. I got it from cellulitis which was due to hypothyroidism. That caused lymphedema which had many symptoms including weeping skin, pitting edema, an infection, and left the purple/black marks I have today. The treatment after getting the infection under control is compression hose to control the edema. However, now I have a second non-pitting edema on top of it. Here's some information on edema:EdemaDefinitionEdema is a condition of abnormally large fluid volume in the circulatory system or in tissues between the body's cells (interstitial spaces).DescriptionNormally the body maintains a balance of fluid in tissues by ensuring that the same of amount of water entering the body also leaves it. The circulatory system transports fluid within the body via its network of blood vessels. The fluid, which contains oxygen and nutrients needed by the cells, moves from the walls of the blood vessels into the body's tissues. After its nutrients are used up, fluid moves back into the blood vessels and returns to the heart. The lymphatic system (a network of channels in the body that carry lymph, a colorless fluid containing white blood cells to fight infection) also absorbs and transports this fluid. In edema, either too much fluid moves from the blood vessels into the tissues, or not enough fluid moves from the tissues back into the blood vessels. This fluid imbalance can cause mild to severe swelling in one or more parts of the body.Causes and symptomsMany ordinary factors can upset the balance of fluid in the body to cause edema, including:Immobility. The leg muscles normally contract and compress blood vessels to promote blood flow with walking or running. When these muscles are not used, blood can collect in the veins, making it difficult for fluid to move from tissues back into the vessels.Heat. Warm temperatures cause the blood vessels to expand, making it easier for fluid to cross into surrounding tissues. High humidity also aggravates this situation.Medications. Certain drugs, such as steroids, hormone replacements, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and some blood pressure medications may affect how fast fluid leaves blood vessels.Intake of salty foods. The body needs a constant concentration of salt in its tissues. When excess salt is taken in, the body dilutes it by retaining fluid.Menstruation and pregnancy. The changing levels of hormones affect the rate at which fluid enters and leaves the tissues.Some medical conditions may also cause edema, including:Heart failure. When the heart is unable to maintain adequate blood flow throughout the circulatory system, the excess fluid pressure within the blood vessels can cause shifts into the interstitial spaces. Left-sided heart failure can cause pulmonary edema, as fluid shifts into the lungs. The patient may develop rapid, shallow respirations, shortness of breath, and a cough. Right-sided heart failure can cause pitting edema, a swelling in the tissue under the skin of the lower legs and feet. Pressing this tissue with a finger tip leads to a noticeable momentary indentation.Kidney disease. The decrease in sodium and water excretion can result in fluid retention and overload.Thyroid or liver disease. These conditions can change the concentration of protein in the blood, affecting fluid movement in and out of the tissues. In advanced liver disease, the liver is enlarged and fluid may build-up in the abdomen.Malnutrition. Protein levels are decreased in the blood, and in an effort to maintain a balance of concentrations, fluid shifts out of the vessels and causes edema in tissue spaces.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 5, 2007
    • 04:39 AM
    • 0
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  • Yes, I have it. I got it from cellulitis which was due to hypothyroidism. That caused lymphedema which had many symptoms including weeping skin, pitting edema, an infection, and left the purple/black marks I have today. The treatment after getting the infection under control is compression hose to control the edema. However, now I have a second non-pitting edema on top of it. Here's some information on edema:EdemaDefinitionEdema is a condition of abnormally large fluid volume in the circulatory system or in tissues between the body's cells (interstitial spaces).DescriptionNormally the body maintains a balance of fluid in tissues by ensuring that the same of amount of water entering the body also leaves it. The circulatory system transports fluid within the body via its network of blood vessels. The fluid, which contains oxygen and nutrients needed by the cells, moves from the walls of the blood vessels into the body's tissues. After its nutrients are used up, fluid moves back into the blood vessels and returns to the heart. The lymphatic system (a network of channels in the body that carry lymph, a colorless fluid containing white blood cells to fight infection) also absorbs and transports this fluid. In edema, either too much fluid moves from the blood vessels into the tissues, or not enough fluid moves from the tissues back into the blood vessels. This fluid imbalance can cause mild to severe swelling in one or more parts of the body.Causes and symptomsMany ordinary factors can upset the balance of fluid in the body to cause edema, including:Immobility. The leg muscles normally contract and compress blood vessels to promote blood flow with walking or running. When these muscles are not used, blood can collect in the veins, making it difficult for fluid to move from tissues back into the vessels.Heat. Warm temperatures cause the blood vessels to expand, making it easier for fluid to cross into surrounding tissues. High humidity also aggravates this situation.Medications. Certain drugs, such as steroids, hormone replacements, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and some blood pressure medications may affect how fast fluid leaves blood vessels.Intake of salty foods. The body needs a constant concentration of salt in its tissues. When excess salt is taken in, the body dilutes it by retaining fluid.Menstruation and pregnancy. The changing levels of hormones affect the rate at which fluid enters and leaves the tissues.Some medical conditions may also cause edema, including:Heart failure. When the heart is unable to maintain adequate blood flow throughout the circulatory system, the excess fluid pressure within the blood vessels can cause shifts into the interstitial spaces. Left-sided heart failure can cause pulmonary edema, as fluid shifts into the lungs. The patient may develop rapid, shallow respirations, shortness of breath, and a cough. Right-sided heart failure can cause pitting edema, a swelling in the tissue under the skin of the lower legs and feet. Pressing this tissue with a finger tip leads to a noticeable momentary indentation.Kidney disease. The decrease in sodium and water excretion can result in fluid retention and overload.Thyroid or liver disease. These conditions can change the concentration of protein in the blood, affecting fluid movement in and out of the tissues. In advanced liver disease, the liver is enlarged and fluid may build-up in the abdomen.Malnutrition. Protein levels are decreased in the blood, and in an effort to maintain a balance of concentrations, fluid shifts out of the vessels and causes edema in tissue spaces.My mother who is 65yrs old was just put in the hospital today. The doctor told my sister it is weeping leg syn. She has had her legs leaking for about 6 months but was to hard headed to go to the doctors. Can u tell me how seriouse this condition is? And how do they treat it? Thanks so much for your help. Suzanne
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 15, 2007
    • 07:10 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
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