Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

why is my son vomiting every night?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 14 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • March 3, 2007
  • 01:33 AM

For the last three nights my son wakes up in the middle of the night and vomits, he has little appetite but otherwise during the day he is fine. Anyone have a suggestion. I'm living in China so real medical help isn't available, can you help?

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14 Replies:

  • Well, you don't say exactly where you are living, or how old your son is, so I'm not sure how to answer. But that said...I've lived in China, and waking up in the middle of the night throwing up is exactly the odd kind of symptom Chinese traditional doctors are good at. Both I and my husband got medical treatment while we were living there (in Hangzhou).If you are there, you probably are associated with, and hopefully friends with, some of the local people. Ask someone you have respect for if they know of someone they can recommend. That is how we did it when we were there, and it worked out well.Without more details, I have nothing else I can suggest.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • My teenage son has done that off and on since he was an infant, but his is caused by asthma (no we do not smoke, nor allow smoking in our home). He is usually fine during the day, although a bit on the thin side because he's never had much of an appitite either. But for some reason when it gets night, his airways tend to become more sensitive and when he lies down his airways narrow to the point of him coughing and throwing up. Sometimes all it takes is one cough before everything comes up.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Please do not listen to anything Shula or Acuann tell you. My sister just passed away because Shula and Acuann told her that her doctor was wrong and she did not have a serious condition. Acuann even told her to get acupuncture to get healed. These people are going to be investigated for practicing medicine without a license. Shula and Acuann are specifically wanted in connection with my sisters homocide. Thats right homocide. If she would have listened to her doctor instead of these internet quacks she would still be here today. Rest assured I will do everything in my power to put these two behind bars and shut this website down for good.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi,My daughter is 3 and has been vomiting nearly evey night for 3 weeks and on and off for two months, she is also generally, active and happy during the day. But it seems to be taking a toll now and she now has the runs, we are off to a specialist in two days, so i will keep you posted. I have a friend how does chinese medicine, i might just talk to her about it.I am in the blue mountians sydneyDom
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 9, 2007
    • 03:10 AM
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  • I hope this is simply gastroesophageal reflux or something benign. However, vomiting that occurs during sleep should be evaluated immediately. I don't know what kind of care you have access to- at a minimum someone should look at his eyes and make sure he does not have "papilledema." I would take this very seriously. Best of luck-
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • October 12, 2007
    • 05:01 AM
    • 0
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  • When you say the child is vomiting at night, what exactly happens? Is he awake and aware when he starts vomiting? How does he act afterwards?
    dorinda07 4 Replies
    • January 24, 2008
    • 05:54 PM
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  • I believe that you should get your child tested with a EEG that stays connected all night ,so he can be evaluated neuologically for a possible case of epilepsy. If he is having a certain type of seizure, he may be vomiting as a result. I think this is the most likely diagnosis. Good luck.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • January 25, 2008
    • 04:09 AM
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  • Same thing on the TV show, Mysterious Diagnosis...watch and see if it continues. On the TV show, they finally hooked the child up to brain monitors and watched while the child slept, with a video camera on the child. She had seizures, but they were a very rare and funny vomiting type of seizure that is rarely recognized. Be very careful here and a neurologist, if you can find one...they thought at first some type of stomach problem or allergies...so could be that...
    Monsterlove 2,921 Replies
    • January 25, 2008
    • 07:33 AM
    • 0
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  • Achalasia, also known as esophageal achalasia, achalasia cardiae, cardiospasm, dyssynergia esophagus, and esophageal aperistalsis, is an esophageal motility disorder. In this disorder, the smooth muscle layer of the esophagus has impaired peristalsis (muscular ability to move food down the esophagus), and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) fails to relax properly in response to swallowing. The most common form is primary achalasia, which has no known underlying cause.Signs and symptomsDysphagia, or difficulty swallowingRegurgitation of undigested foodCoughing, especially when reclining or lying downWeight loss due to inadequate nutrient intakeNon-cardiac chest pains (NCCP), which may radiate to the back, jaw, neck, and armsSome patients also experience heartburn, difficulty belching, or frequent hiccupsDiagnosis Due to the similarity of symptoms, achalasia can be misdiagnosed as other disorders, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), hiatus hernia, and even psychosomatic disorders.Investigations for achalasia includeX-ray with a barium swallow, or esophagography. The patient swallows a barium solution, which fails to pass smoothly through the lower esophageal sphincter. An air-fluid margin is seen over the barium column due to the lack of peristalsis. Narrowing is observed at the level of the gastroesophageal junction ("bird's beak" or "rat tail" appearance of the lower esophagus). Esophageal dilation is present in varying degrees as the esophagus is gradually stretched by retained food. A five-minute timed barium swallow is useful to measure the effectiveness of treatment.Manometry, the key test for establishing the diagnosis. A probe measures the pressure waves in different parts of the esophagus and stomach during the act of swallowing. A thin tube is inserted through the nose, and the patient is instructed to swallow several times.Endoscopy, which provides a view inside the esophagus and stomach. A small camera is inserted through the mouth while the patient is under sedation. The endoscopist observes a "pop" as the scope passes through the non-relaxing lower esophageal sphincter.CT scan may be used to exclude pseudoachalasia, or achalasia symptoms resulting from a different cause, usually esophageal cancer.Pathological examination reveals a defect in the nerves that control the motility of the esophagus (the myenteric plexus). The esophagus is dilated and hypertrophied. In Chagas disease, the ganglion cells are destroyed by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite. ComplicationsGastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or heartburn.Achalasia patients have an increased risk of developing Barrett's esophagus or Barrett's mucosa, a premalignant condition which may lead to esophageal cancer over a period of years.Aspiration pneumonia: Food and liquid, including saliva, are retained in the esophagus and may be inhaled into the lungs, especially while sleeping in a horizontal position.One possibility.
    rad-skw 1,605 Replies
    • January 25, 2008
    • 10:32 AM
    • 0
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  • For the last three nights my son wakes up in the middle of the night and vomits, he has little appetite but otherwise during the day he is fine. Anyone have a suggestion. I'm living in China so real medical help isn't available, can you help? I hat esaying this, but look into epilopsy. I know what your thinking... Epilopsy is when you have seizures, But it also has other symptoms. I was watching mystery diagnosis (a tv show) and there was a case on there that sounds just like what your son is going through. The girl on the show was vomiting every night and but was fine during the day. It turns out that after several months of docyors running tests, they figured out that she had epilopsy and it was triggered when she slept. Hre "seizure" was vomiting.. Please look up the show or look into it... Hope it helps..
    sharbearhigg 2 Replies
    • January 12, 2009
    • 05:49 AM
    • 0
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  • Hi,My daughter is 3 and has been vomiting nearly evey night for 3 weeks and on and off for two months, she is also generally, active and happy during the day. But it seems to be taking a toll now and she now has the runs, we are off to a specialist in two days, so i will keep you posted. I have a friend how does chinese medicine, i might just talk to her about it.I am in the blue mountians sydneyDomHiI spotted your little girls symptoms and they are so similar to thatvof my 4 year old son. He has been sick every night for two weeks but seems totally fine during the day. Please let me know what diagnosis you were given because I can't get any sense from my doctor and I just know that this is not a bug. Thanks.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 8, 2009
    • 11:48 AM
    • 0
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  • For the last three nights my son wakes up in the middle of the night and vomits, he has little appetite but otherwise during the day he is fine. Anyone have a suggestion. I'm living in China so real medical help isn't available, can you help?I have a five year old that did that for about 3 months on & off. I couldn't find an answer anywhere. I finally stopped giving him milk and anything dairy based. I did that for about 2 months and the vomiting stopped. I now give him dairy products again and everything seems to be fine. It seems like such a simple fix but trust me it was that easy. He hasn't trown up since.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 6, 2010
    • 11:19 PM
    • 0
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  • When I was in my 20s I would throw up almost every night. Sometimes it would be right after supper, sometimes I would have to get up in the middle of the night. I found out I was gluten intolerant (wheat, oats, barley and rye). After I completely took that out of my diet I stopped vomiting. It is worth a try. The doctors are now saying that 1 in 100 people are intolerant and believe that it is closer to 1-33. There are many gluten free products now including cookies, cakes, donuts, etc.
    cozynana 39 Replies
    • December 7, 2010
    • 01:04 PM
    • 0
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  • Hi, our son also started a mysterious cycle of vomiting at night when he was between 18 months and 2 years of age, we could almost set the clock to be ready for the 2am vomit fest. This progressed to also vomiting randomly during the day some days and not others. He was checked for a lot of different things, bowel obstruction, kidney infection... etc etc. Every test he had came back fine.He was eventually diagnosed by a specialist with Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome/Periodic Vomiting syndrome.He never suffered a fever, was otherwise in good health never had diarrhea. One thing we found did seem to trigger him was sugary foods and stress/excitment. So any holidays, parties etc would pretty much come with a good dose of vomiting.During the day we could often tell when a vomiting spell was coming on as he would go quite pale and get dark circles under his eyes.Please get your son checked out properly, it could be Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome or one of the many and more serious conditions our son was checked for before his diagnosis was made.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 10, 2010
    • 05:39 AM
    • 0
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