Discussions By Condition: Sleep disorders

sleep apnea symptoms

Posted In: Sleep disorders 8 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • March 12, 2007
  • 07:38 PM

If anyone has sleep apnea and has symptoms other than the usual (snoring, sore throat, etc) I'd appreciate hearing from you.

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8 Replies:

  • I was diagnosed a year ago with obstructive sleep apnea. Prior to that, for 15+ years my symptoms were extreme chronic fatigue, brain fog (inability to think well, or sometimes at all), and terribly disrupted sleep. My emotional life almost vanished; I was emotionally dull, and the few feelings that I did still have were all negative -- fear, anger, sadness, and depression. I couldn't work; I've only worked for 2 years out of the past 13. I'm just now recovering enough (now that I'm getting effective treatment for my apnea, and for a low level of anxiety that was also disrupting my sleep) that I'll be able to start working again soon. And I also had so little energy that I couldn't keep up most relationships with friends and family. Most of my friendships died out, and my family relationships were sorely strained too.I also did snore, but I didn't know that until I had a sleep study at a clinic. I haven't had a sleeping partner in many years, so ... no one to tell me that I snored.Any of that sound like things you're experiencing?
    AmateurHistorian 74 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hmm, I replied to this awhile ago, but my reply never appeared. So here goes again. For 15+ years I had chronic fatigue from an unexplained source, and only a year ago found out that it was caused by sleep apnea and a small degree of anxiety that also disrupted my sleep. My symptoms were:Badly disrupted sleep. At my worst, I was unable to sleep more than 1-1/2 hours at a time, or more than 3-4 hours a night.I did snore, but since I haven't had a sleeping partner in many years, I didn't know that until I had a sleep study a year ago.Night sweats, mostly on my head and chest. Even with room temp of 68-70 degrees, covered only with a sheet, and wearing only a T-shirt and underwear, I would sweat so much that every time I woke up during the night, I'd have to turn my pillow to a dry spot. Sometimes I'd move to a different, dry part of the bed. Often I had to change into a dry T-shirt during the night.Brain fog. Even when my sleep was somewhat better than described above, I couldn't think clearly. I had to drop out of graduate school with my program 2/3 finished. I'm an avid reader, but I went through months and even years at a time when I couldn't read any non-fiction at all, and the only fiction I could read was books I had read before.Extreme fatigue. After nights of bad sleep, I was a zombie, unable to read, think, work or do anything more than eat, excrete, watch TV, and play computer solitaire. At my worst, I had days when I couldn't get out of bed for anything except the bathroom; I couldn't even eat. I sometimes went 3-4 weeks between grocery trips, and ate some very weird meals as my food supply neared empty. I would sometimes spend 5-6 straight days indoors, never even opening my front door. In 1994, for the first time I lost a job because I was unable to produce any work at all. In the 13 years since then, I've only worked a total of 2 years.Emotional dullness. My emotional life mostly vanished for almost 5 years, and the few emotions I had left were all negative: fear, depression, sadness, and anger.Social isolation. Not a direct symptom, but a result of the fatigue and emotional dullness. Most of my friendships withered and died because I couldn't keep up with people. I couldn't go to my church or support groups. All of my family relationships were strained, and even my two children felt that I had abandoned them.Also not a direct symptom, but -- nearly continuous thoughts of suicide and fear of dying. (I also have lifelong chronic depression that was never adequately treated until recently, so that contributed a lot.) But my fatigue got so bad at times that I thought that at some point my heart would just stop. Or else that I would end my life myself because it had become so completely joyless and unrewarding.Since I got my diagnoses a year ago, I'm now getting proper treatment for the apnea, anxiety, and depression. My emotional and physical health are steadily improving, and I should be able to work again soon. I still have some fatigue, and may never be completely free of that. But all of my other direct symptoms are gone, and I no longer think about death and suicide, and I'm rebuilding my social life and family relationships.Hope that helped ....
    AmateurHistorian 74 Replies Flag this Response
  • hi, i have all these same symptoms i feel tired all the time but can never sleep right i have every symptom and i have a question do you no any programs that will help me pay to get treatment as this has made it to wear i cant work
    droozy 1 Replies
    • November 13, 2008
    • 11:32 AM
    • 0
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  • If anyone has sleep apnea and has symptoms other than the usual (snoring, sore throat, etc) I'd appreciate hearing from you.Hi,The most obvious sign of sleep apnea is snoring that is loud and consistent. You may pausewhile you are snoring. You may also choke or gasp after you have paused. When you sleep onyour back, the snoring gets louder. If you sleep on your side, the snoring may not be as loud.You may or may not snore every night. Eventually, the snoring may increase and it may getlouder as you sleep.Since you’re sleep while you’re snoring or gasping, you may not know that you’re havingbreathing issues. Others will see the signs before you and will let you know if it becomes apattern. Be aware that just because you may be a chronic snorer, it doesn’t mean that you havesleep apnea.If you are fighting sleep during the day, that could be a sign that you have sleep apnea. If you’renot engaged in any activity, you may end up falling asleep very quickly. If this happens whileyou’re at work or you’re driving, the chances are greater that you may end up in a work-relatedaccident or an accident while you’re driving.There are other signs and symptoms that people may not associate with sleep apnea. They are:• Headaches in the morning• Frequent urination in the evening or night hours• Moody or experiencing a change in your personality• Can’t concentrate, focus or loss of memory• Dry throat in the morning as you wake upThe muscles in your throat are used to keep the airway open so that you can get air into yourlungs. However, when you’re sleeping, your throat muscles are relaxed. This means that yourairway can be blocked and air won’t get into your lungs.With obstructive sleep apnea, you can also experience the following:• If you have a tiny structure at the head and neck, the size of the airway may be smaller inyour mouth and throat.• The muscles in your throat and your tongue are more relaxed than they should be.• Being overweight or obese, you will have additional soft fat tissue. This tissue can getthick in the windpipe wall. There is not much of an opening and what is available maynot stay open.If you are an older adult, the signals of your brain may not keep the muscles of yourthroat stiff like they should.• With the blocked airways, you may end up snoring loudly as you sleep.Hope this helps!
    John_Brooks 5 Replies
    • October 23, 2009
    • 03:52 PM
    • 0
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  • Hi.My husband snoring was a nightmare to me=( So i digged the web and found lots of information about it. I arranged it and so here are a few tips that can help you stop snoring the natural way without using any drugs:* Try to stay at a healthy weight. * Establish a routine. Make an effort to go to bed at the some time every night. * Avoid sleeping on your back. * Put some bricks under the legs of your bed to raise its head by 4-5 inches. This can help you stop your tongue from falling towards the back of your throat, which can result in a blocked airway. * Quit smoking to reduce the inflammation of the airway. * Stay away from sedatives and antihistamines. * Get regular exercise. * In case the air in your home is too dry, you should use a humidifier. * If you have a stuffy nose, use decongestants to correct the problem. * Don't use overly soft or large pillows.
    ElviraJoy 2 Replies
    • February 25, 2010
    • 04:35 PM
    • 0
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  • Hmm, I replied to this awhile ago, but my reply never appeared. So here goes again. For 15+ years I had chronic fatigue from an unexplained source, and only a year ago found out that it was caused by sleep apnea and a small degree of anxiety that also disrupted my sleep. My symptoms were:Badly disrupted sleep. At my worst, I was unable to sleep more than 1-1/2 hours at a time, or more than 3-4 hours a night.I did snore, but since I haven't had a sleeping partner in many years, I didn't know that until I had a sleep study a year ago.Night sweats, mostly on my head and chest. Even with room temp of 68-70 degrees, covered only with a sheet, and wearing only a T-shirt and underwear, I would sweat so much that every time I woke up during the night, I'd have to turn my pillow to a dry spot. Sometimes I'd move to a different, dry part of the bed. Often I had to change into a dry T-shirt during the night.Brain fog. Even when my sleep was somewhat better than described above, I couldn't think clearly. I had to drop out of graduate school with my program 2/3 finished. I'm an avid reader, but I went through months and even years at a time when I couldn't read any non-fiction at all, and the only fiction I could read was books I had read before.Extreme fatigue. After nights of bad sleep, I was a zombie, unable to read, think, work or do anything more than eat, excrete, watch TV, and play computer solitaire. At my worst, I had days when I couldn't get out of bed for anything except the bathroom; I couldn't even eat. I sometimes went 3-4 weeks between grocery trips, and ate some very weird meals as my food supply neared empty. I would sometimes spend 5-6 straight days indoors, never even opening my front door. In 1994, for the first time I lost a job because I was unable to produce any work at all. In the 13 years since then, I've only worked a total of 2 years.Emotional dullness. My emotional life mostly vanished for almost 5 years, and the few emotions I had left were all negative: fear, depression, sadness, and anger.Social isolation. Not a direct symptom, but a result of the fatigue and emotional dullness. Most of my friendships withered and died because I couldn't keep up with people. I couldn't go to my church or support groups. All of my family relationships were strained, and even my two children felt that I had abandoned them.Also not a direct symptom, but -- nearly continuous thoughts of suicide and fear of dying. (I also have lifelong chronic depression that was never adequately treated until recently, so that contributed a lot.) But my fatigue got so bad at times that I thought that at some point my heart would just stop. Or else that I would end my life myself because it had become so completely joyless and unrewarding.Since I got my diagnoses a year ago, I'm now getting proper treatment for the apnea, anxiety, and depression. My emotional and physical health are steadily improving, and I should be able to work again soon. I still have some fatigue, and may never be completely free of that. But all of my other direct symptoms are gone, and I no longer think about death and suicide, and I'm rebuilding my social life and family relationships.Hope that helped ....Ive been struggling with this severe brain fog for the past year, it makes me constantly anxious, i feel like constantly confused and disoriented, and no one seems to understand what im going through. Ive seen different doctors, and none have been able to get past diagnosing me with anxiety or depression. All my blood work has come out normal,m.r.i scans and all, and nothing seems out of the norm. I was diagnosed with a deviated septum and nasal obstruction that my E.N.T says can cause sleep apnea. I snore at night apparently, but havent really noticed until a friend pointed it out. I usually dont wake up in the middle of the night gasping for air or anything like that; I do however feel constanly sleepy despite getting alot of sleep(maybe too much sometime), and feel short of breathe regularly. I sometimes wake up around 7 am feeling like my head is in a rollercoaster, and I get this really bad panic attack with severe tachycardia for like 10 mins. This thing is really depressing me, all i do is research as to what could be the cause of this, and I keep coming to a dead end. Does any of this sound somewhat familiar to what you were going through, and how do you feel after getting treated?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • i like all view.thanks for sharing.Sleep pills is a most probable medicine for your wonderful sleep. It seems to be a perfect medication power for your short term situation, just like travelling across the road, or if you want to get as your medical procedure, your common sleep is disorder, usually this pills are used to remove all side effect,sleep aids is a best treatment for insomnia. The usage of Sleep pills is depending upon the situations; it may be a long term or short term situation. In general sleep pills are most suitable in long term basis, instead is going to be as a daily basis, over the period of time this pills is totally depend and tolerate people on daily basis. It is a most effective pill, and gets the maximum benefit from your side effect. Sleep pills is a most probable medicine for your wonderful sleep. It seems to be a perfect medication power for your short term situation, just like travelling across the road, or if you want to get as your medical procedure, your common sleep is disorder, usually this pills are used to remove all side effect,sleep aids is a best treatment for insomnia. The usage of Sleep pills is depending upon the situations; it may be a long term or short term situation. In general sleep pills are most suitable in long term basis, instead is going to be as a daily basis, over the period of time this pills is totally depend and tolerate people on daily basis. It is a most effective pill, and gets the maximum benefit from your side effect.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Well, there are many symptoms of sleep apnea like, loud and chronic snoring, choking, snorting, or gasping during sleep, long pauses in breathing, daytime sleepiness (no matter how much time you spend in bed), going to the bathroom frequently during the night, morning headaches, insomnia or nighttime awakenings, moodiness, irritability, or depression etc etc. I think it's really tough to recognize sleep apnea on your own, since the major symptoms only occur when you’re sleeping. Better to consult a sleep specialist immediately if you suspect sleep apnea.
    jameswilson 12 Replies
    • September 12, 2013
    • 01:04 PM
    • 0
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