Discussions By Condition: Shoulder conditions

S.I.C.K. Scapula & Winged Scapula

Posted In: Shoulder conditions 6 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • June 27, 2009
  • 10:07 PM

Are they the same thing, what are the symptoms of both of those??
I'm trying to figure out what's wrong with my shoulder.

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6 Replies:

  • No, they are not the same thing.Do your shoulder blades (scapula) stick out from your ribcage closest to your spine, like wings? This is a 'winged scapula', usually caused by a weakness of the serratus anterior muscles which lie on top of your ribs underneath your armpit on your side and attach to the scapula. It can also be caused by a malfunction of the trapezius muscle. The most common symptom (other than the obvious protuberance of the scapula) is a lack of range of motion in the scapula. More specifically, the inability to raise your arm above your head. S.I.C.K. Scapula would normally present with one shoulder rotated down and forward from the position of the other. Pain is usually at the coracoid process-- a small protuberance at the lower front of what's commonly called the shoulder-- in the front, toward your arm, directly above the clavicle and below your acromium process. Pain can also be noted at on top of what most refer to as the shoulder (the acromioclavicular joint)-- if you feel from your neck to your arm, you will be able to feel an indentation before you get to your arm (kind of a dip, where two bones come together and meet with your arm). This type of dysfunction of the scapula also results in limited range of motion for the shoulder. That's very basic. I could probably help you better if you were to choose to describe your specific issue with your own shoulder and what has lead you to suspect either of these issues. I help people rehabilitate from such injuries for a living; I'd like to try to help you. Any details of your situation, your medical history and any injuries you might have sustained would be helpful. Also, do you play any type of sport?
    Harmonium 322 Replies Flag this Response
  • I am in gymnastics and when I did my round-off backhandspring a few weeks ago my right shoulder popped and gave out.. I tried to do a back bend to stretch it (usually it helps) and it gave out again. The next day it was sore, swollen and stiff. It hurt to lift and move it around. I didn't say anything hoping it would go away, but two weeks later it still hurt quite a bit. It hurts to brush and was my hair. It hurts after long periods of writing.. I can't lift it up, back or to the side without pain. I've been going to the chiropractor hoping it will help.. But he won't tell me what is wrong one day he thinks something is wrong with my rotator cuff muscles, the next it's my shoulder blade.. He also says that he has to "put it back" in place.When you look at my shoulders from the front my right shouler looks lower and when I lift my arms back (like I'm hooking my bra) my right shoulder blade sticks out..My shoulder pops a lot and hurts when it does. The pain is from my shoulder blade to the top of my shoulder and sometimes it goes down my arm some..My chiropractor told me to have someone at the hospital look at it (I volunteer in the sports medicince department). I had the Athletic Trainer look at it and he thinks it's still really inflammed.. He thinks I have a lot of scar tissue.. I'm not allowed to do gymnastics for awile until the inflammation is gone.. I don't know how I ended up with scar tissue in my shoulder, but do you have any idea what could be wrong with it?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • No, they are not the same thing.Do your shoulder blades (scapula) stick out from your ribcage closest to your spine, like wings? This is a 'winged scapula', usually caused by a weakness of the serratus anterior muscles which lie on top of your ribs underneath your armpit on your side and attach to the scapula. It can also be caused by a malfunction of the trapezius muscle. The most common symptom (other than the obvious protuberance of the scapula) is a lack of range of motion in the scapula. More specifically, the inability to raise your arm above your head. S.I.C.K. Scapula would normally present with one shoulder rotated down and forward from the position of the other. Pain is usually at the coracoid process-- a small protuberance at the lower front of what's commonly called the shoulder-- in the front, toward your arm, directly above the clavicle and below your acromium process. Pain can also be noted at on top of what most refer to as the shoulder (the acromioclavicular joint)-- if you feel from your neck to your arm, you will be able to feel an indentation before you get to your arm (kind of a dip, where two bones come together and meet with your arm). This type of dysfunction of the scapula also results in limited range of motion for the shoulder. That's very basic. I could probably help you better if you were to choose to describe your specific issue with your own shoulder and what has lead you to suspect either of these issues. I help people rehabilitate from such injuries for a living; I'd like to try to help you. Any details of your situation, your medical history and any injuries you might have sustained would be helpful. Also, do you play any type of sport?harmonium,I found this post after searching for info regarding my own very complex shoulder problems. I would like to discuss my issues with you off line. how might I contact you to discuss?thank you
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • No, they are not the same thing.Do your shoulder blades (scapula) stick out from your ribcage closest to your spine, like wings? This is a 'winged scapula', usually caused by a weakness of the serratus anterior muscles which lie on top of your ribs underneath your armpit on your side and attach to the scapula. It can also be caused by a malfunction of the trapezius muscle. The most common symptom (other than the obvious protuberance of the scapula) is a lack of range of motion in the scapula. More specifically, the inability to raise your arm above your head. S.I.C.K. Scapula would normally present with one shoulder rotated down and forward from the position of the other. Pain is usually at the coracoid process-- a small protuberance at the lower front of what's commonly called the shoulder-- in the front, toward your arm, directly above the clavicle and below your acromium process. Pain can also be noted at on top of what most refer to as the shoulder (the acromioclavicular joint)-- if you feel from your neck to your arm, you will be able to feel an indentation before you get to your arm (kind of a dip, where two bones come together and meet with your arm). This type of dysfunction of the scapula also results in limited range of motion for the shoulder. That's very basic. I could probably help you better if you were to choose to describe your specific issue with your own shoulder and what has lead you to suspect either of these issues. I help people rehabilitate from such injuries for a living; I'd like to try to help you. Any details of your situation, your medical history and any injuries you might have sustained would be helpful. Also, do you play any type of sport?Hey Harmonium and anyone else who'd like to answere, I am a male who just turned 26 and have bi-lateral winging scapulas. My first (left) presented itself when i was 17 after leaning on crutches for 3 and 1/2 months. It brought mostly discomfort and i begin to feel some tightening in my left hip and eventually shortening and turning in of my left leg, also my left pectoralis minor shrunk up and my left delt got huge, I lived in some emotional distress for years and continued to lift weights and work out, until i was 22 and my right side started winging. THis time it brought about alot of pain around my shoulder and up my neck into my face, my throat and voice even began to hurt and feel muffled when i speak, these sypmtoms still are present today even though i have stretched my neck and surrounding muscles to try and relieve my pain. I also feel some leg sypmtoms in my right as well and feel like both of my feet are getting flat. ANy help please Help me!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hey Harmonium and anyone else who'd like to answere, I am a male who just turned 26 and have bi-lateral winging scapulas. My first (left) presented itself when i was 17 after leaning on crutches for 3 and 1/2 months. It brought mostly discomfort and i begin to feel some tightening in my left hip and eventually shortening and turning in of my left leg, also my left pectoralis minor shrunk up and my left delt got huge, I lived in some emotional distress for years and continued to lift weights and work out, until i was 22 and my right side started winging. THis time it brought about alot of pain around my shoulder and up my neck into my face, my throat and voice even began to hurt and feel muffled when i speak, these sypmtoms still are present today even though i have stretched my neck and surrounding muscles to try and relieve my pain. I also feel some leg sypmtoms in my right as well and feel like both of my feet are getting flat. ANy help please Help me!You need soft tissue work(massage, ART or Gratson) on upper traps and pec minor musclesStart a progressive resistance strength program for serratus anterior, lower traps, rhomboids and always remember to keep your legs strong! Specifically Glutes, hamstrings posterior chain strengthening exercises most of all ill health and premature aging can be attributed to atrophy of these muscles.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 24, 2011
    • 03:17 PM
    • 0
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  • Just an update. I have an Aurora chick flying round the cage with Bengie parents. . Im very pleased .The parents went down straight away so this time Im going to take the hen away and let him raise them on his own
    ZvyaginzevaE 1 Replies Flag this Response
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