Discussions By Condition: Obesessive Compulsive Disorder

New Diagnosis

Posted In: Obesessive Compulsive Disorder 8 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • November 2, 2006
  • 02:57 PM

My daughter was just diagnosed with this disease. She was also diagnosed with ADHD although she has no sign of the hyperactivity. Is there anyone that has been through this or something similar?

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8 Replies:

  • I can sympathize with you and your daughter. I have been diagnosed with OCD, along with other mental disorders. It's a tough thing to live with. VERY time consuming and embarressing. Best wishes.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 13, 2006
    • 03:18 AM
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  • Hi,Just browsing the messageboard as I have a problem with my gums right now. Noticed this post. I have had OCD for 9years now. I'm a teacher. Which just goes to show it can happen to anyone.It's a real pain. Hopefully she'll be young enough to grow out of it.Good luck
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 3, 2006
    • 07:18 PM
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  • ADHD does not always mean she's hyperactive. Psychiatrically, a mental disorder usually diagnosed in childhood, which manifests itself in a patient with symptoms such as hyperactivity, forgetfulness, mood shifts, poor impulse control, and distractibility. In neurological pathology, ADHD is currently considered to be a chronic syndrome for which no medical cure is available. Pediatric patients as well as adults may present with ADHD. see a pediatric neurologist for treatment. Best of luck.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 11, 2006
    • 10:28 PM
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  • There's hope for ADHD. I have ADHD, I'm fifteen.I had always had a hard time paying attention, taking directions, with hyper activity, staying still, reading text books, etc. I have many symptoms of someone with adhd. However, I've learned to cope with them without medicine.At first, I was put on concerta when I was a kid. It changed me, I felt like a robot. I hated it, I felt like someone was controlling me. Sure, I could pay attention better, but I felt socially inactive and quiet unlike I usually was. I despised it. Then I switched to Straterra in Middle School. It worked! My grades were improving, I was paying attention, everything was perfect, until 7th grade it a year after. I started feeling depressed, controlled again, socially in active. I kept praying to God that he'd take me to heaven with him so I could get this life over with, I felt no purpose for living life. I didn't attempt suicide, I just wish I never existed. I hated life, and there were no major outside forces to cause me to hate it. My grades were slipping because of my unhappiness. A couple of days I forgot to take my medicine, I noticed my attitude changed. I was becoming hyper again. Amazing! I felt so happy. I had realized why I was feeling so terrible about myself, the medicine was making me feel like that, just like concerta had, but even worse. In eighth grade I took myself off of the medicine, that had been an amazing year. My grades were improving from C's and D's to C's and B's. Now, as a sophmore, I get A's and B's. I taught myself how to pay attention, because I was driven to do anything to prove to my parents I didn't need the medicine. I would do anything to get off of it. I coped with my condition. Being on the medicine taught me how to pay attention, but if I had stayed on it there's no way I'd apprietiate life like I do. I still have trouble with a few things, expecially following directions. You can't get rid of adhd, but you can cope with it. Every person is different. My brother has been on medicine long enough that he's dependant on it, he can't concentrate at all without it. It helps him in school.ADHD is deffinently not the end of the world.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, my son was misdiagnosed with ADHD/ODD . He actually suffers from Bi-Polar Disorder and an undeterminable Tic Disorder-possible Tourette Sysndrome. I have OCD and can see some of it in him as well. He was put on Haldol and Cogentin and it has worked wonders.It sounds as if she may be ADD-w/o the hyperactivity, which helps. See another docotor if your budget allows. I have found MORE than TWO opinions is vitial to help determine any health situation. My oldest son-15 is suffering from daily headaches, so I make several trips to the doctor each month between the two of them and my husband. He is Bi-Polar and has Degenerative Disc Disease. Hang in there and utilize the internet to help you. Best of Luck!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I hope that this thread is not dead.But for all you people who just have to 'live' with this obsessive compulsive disorder. There may very well be a cure. But you just have to believe it. THey say that there is a definite connection between OCD and mercury toxicity. And there is a whole body of knowledge which you can latch on to to not only manage but cure your condition with Gods grace. So please, DON'T give up on a cure. And if you need anymore information then please let me know.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 16, 2007
    • 01:07 AM
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  • Hello, I have recently been diagnosed at the ripe old age of 35 with ADHD. :rolleyes:Up until about 6 months ago, I had been being unsuccessfully treated for OCD ...for 22 years. It seemed no drugs were working nor was behaviorial therapy. Turns out, that's because my OCD tendancies were actually just slight OCD like symptoms stemming from ADHD which had gone undiscovered for 22 years by 6 psychiatrists, 4 family doctors and assorted ER doctors/nurses/janitors...although sometimes i think we'd be better off asking the janitors. :pAt any rate, in the course of my medical journey I was also "diagnosed" with bi-polar disorder, severe depression and anorexia (they refused to believe i just thought eating was boring and that i'd rather be spending my time doing something else and therefore would forget to eat).Incidentally, the doctor who finally diagnosed me properly was actually not even my psychiatrist. I go to appointments with someone else and in the course of those appointments he had asked me if I had ever been tested for ADHD. I looked at him like "yeah right!! I'm 35! As if!", took the test and scored higher than he had ever seen in his entire career. .....yay. lolAs for the lady who posted saying that her daughter was recently diagnosed with ADHD without the hyperactivity (which is also my case incidentally) I can only say that I couldn't be happier that your daughter was diagnosed early on in her life. For what it is worth, I would like to offer you my experience with being diagnosed and choosing to medicate.Many times doctors don't notice the girls with ADD. That's largely due to the fact that females don't tend to be bouncing off the walls like their male counterpart ADHD kids. So, people don't usually notice (ie. get annoyed enough to do something about) the girls with ADD.In my case, it breaks my heart to think of all the wasted years of therapy, all the pills I took that I didn't need and 9/10 made me feel worse but especially of all the things in my life that may not have gone as they did if I had been diagnosed before age 35. It was a constant struggle for me and horribly difficult to explain to people why even though I had an IQ in the top 2% I still couldn't seem to get a handle on school work or even the day to day things like ....remembering to eat! Couldn't hold down a job, couldn't keep out of debt, couldn't ever keep my head above water well enough to feed myself and pay the rent at the same time, couldn't even carry on a simple conversation for more than 2 minutes without drifting in and out. Which of course causes people to think you are just disinterested in them and makes it extremely difficult to maintain any personal relationships. I became pretty much a hermit.Anyhow, sorry to rant but I wanted to point out the things that she will now not have to struggle through because she can get treatment early on.Incidentally, I have been taking medication for the ADHD now for 5 months and it was like seeing the world as I always had hoped I could. For the first little while it was a bit scary because if you had spent 35 years in a room with 5 TVs and 2 radios on at full blast, when they got shut off the silence would be so foreign it would make you want to turn them back on again. However, once I adjusted to the fact that my brain was no longer so "loud" I was extremely happy to find that I can focus on conversations, read books without rereading the words a bajillion times, actually REMEMBER the conversations and books later on etc etc. I've gone back to school, yep at 35! Although I was very skeptical/fearful initially I couldn't be happier that I chose to go with medication for ADD.I would encourage you to allow your daughter to get treatment. Living with ADD is not very much fun without it and can leave a trail of "ok i wasted 35 years" behind it. I will admit that when I initially began taking the dexedrine, i found a loss of creativity (I'm a graphic artist) and I panicked. I think, however, that what happened is that going for 35 years untreated forced me to use parts of my brain that weren't meant for certain tasks (like drawing a picture) and so I had to re-train my brain a little bit once the dexedrine turned on the parts that had been basically sleeping for 35 years. It took a couple of months to adjust to firing on all cylinders. Even to adjust to remembering to pick up bread. lol "oh my god....i remembered and i actually GOT the bread!!" But once the initial "adjustment/wonderment" period was over it was a huge improvement to every aspect of my life.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 14, 2008
    • 06:28 AM
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  • Oh, I had also wanted to mention a feature of ADHD with ocd tendancies and hopefully offer some insight by giving you an idea of why we can sometimes be short tempered.I used to have an extremely short fuse. So short, in fact, that when I was talking to my father recently about my new improved fuse and asked "Remember how I always had a really short fuse?" he replied, "You even HAD a fuse??". I'll try to explain what it is like to have ADHD and why it causes some of us to have extremely short tempers. You see, when you have ADHD, it may appear to people outside of your brain that you are not busy at the moment and they may ask you a question such as "Hey, Heather? Have you seen my favorite shoes anywhere?". Now, a person without ADHD who was not otherwise occupied would simply answer the question, but for someone who HAS ADHD when you ask them a question, you probably just interrupted about 37 things going on in their head. Even though they may look like they are just sitting on the sofa playing a video game, in their brain they are doing about 37 things and you just interrupted all of them. ADD can also cause a shortness of temper because we know that once we are interrupted, chances are pretty good that there is no way we are going to remember what we were doing before we were interrupted. ie. If someone were to call me on the phone while i was writing this post, there is no way I would remember the idea I have for the next paragraph. (Well, I would now that I have medication. :) ) Also, the frustration of being so forgetful about pretty much everything and the frustration/shame of things that we logically know should only take 2 steps to do but end up taking us 14 steps to do (and we give up anyway somewhere around step 9) can add to the temper issues. It's hard when you know you're not "stupid" but your brain is making things that are simple 10x harder than you know they really are. It may sound ridiculous at age 35 to say this, but it has only been since beginning medication for ADD that I have been able to understand some really basic things. Like...until now I couldn't tell time on a clock if it wasn't digital without actually counting by 5s....out loud. Same goes for OCD, although usually it is because you interrupted an unseen ritual of ours that will now have to be repeated because it was interrupted...and we've already repeated it 8 times already because we "did it wrong". As you can well imagine, this does wonders for personal and work/school relationships. It looks a little like the following situation. The words we say out loud are in quotes and the stuff inside our head is inside the brackets: "What? Oh for crying out loud!! I don't know where your keys are!! (and now I have to recount the dots on that napkin!.....again!!) Gah!"Oh and as for the ocd rituals. Before taking meds for ADD, I knew that the rituals were ridiculous but still felt compelled to do them. ie. I knew that putting the toilet paper roll on backwards would not actually result in my mother becoming gravely ill, but the ocd part of me always made me do it anyway "just in case". Now that I am being treated for ADD, I can say to myself "No, I know that that's ridiculous" and actually walk away. It still flares up a bit here and there if I am really stressed or overtired but the improvement is HUGE.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 14, 2008
    • 07:02 AM
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