Discussions By Condition: Nerve conditions

Unable to move in bed

Posted In: Nerve conditions 4 Replies
  • Posted By: Crashoran
  • July 20, 2009
  • 04:17 AM

This has happened two times:

I crawl into bed and start falling asleep. While I'm falling asleep, I listen very carefully to what is going on around me because sometimes I'm afraid (when I'm alone in the house) that somebody will break in through the door.

All of a sudden a rushing sound/feeling slowly overcomes my entire head and I am unable to open my eyes, move my arms or legs, or speak. I am terrified because all I can hear is this immense rushing/ringing sound and I am unable to hear if anybody is entering the house or see if anybody is in the room with me. During this time I am trying my hardest to move my arms or open my eyes but nothing works. I don't remember what happens after that, I just assume I fall asleep.

It's one of the most terrifying things I've ever experienced! What causes this? Is it just a nightmare? It feels like I'm awake during this..

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4 Replies:

  • Hypnagogic sleep paralysis. In sleep your body is paralyzed -- this is a defense mechanism triggered by your brain to prevent you from moving in your sleep via movement in your dreams, it's basically your body's way of preventing sleep walking and keeping you from falling out of bed. Hypnagogia is the transitional state between the waking state and sleep. In essence, your brain can sometimes mistake you for being asleep when you really aren't and the paralysis onsets early. The brain makes this mistake when you are in a very calm and relaxed state, bordering on sleep. It's kind of like the brain having a false start on the 100m dash. The sounds you are hearing are indicative of hypnagogia as well. Hypnagogic imagery is often auditory or has an auditory component. Like the visuals, hypnagogic sounds vary in intensity from faint impressions to loud noises, such as crashes and bangs (exploding head syndrome). People may imagine their own name called or a doorbell ringing. Typical examples include a feeling of being crushed or suffocated, electric ‘tingles’ or ‘vibrations’, imagined speech and other noises, the imagined presence of a visible or invisible entity, and sometimes intense emotion: fear or euphoria and orgasmic feelings. Basically, if you concentrate and are completely focused in on something expecting to hear a sound or even see something, the brain tends to make it happen. What you have experienced is common and you shouldn't worry at all about it unless new symptoms arise or it is a recurring phenomena. Your mind is playing tricks on you and it is understandable to be scared as you feel completely defenseless as a result of the HSP. Don't worry.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hypnagogic sleep paralysis. In sleep your body is paralyzed -- this is a defense mechanism triggered by your brain to prevent you from moving in your sleep via movement in your dreams, it's basically your body's way of preventing sleep walking and keeping you from falling out of bed. Hypnagogia is the transitional state between the waking state and sleep. In essence, your brain can sometimes mistake you for being asleep when you really aren't and the paralysis onsets early. The brain makes this mistake when you are in a very calm and relaxed state, bordering on sleep. It's kind of like the brain having a false start on the 100m dash. The sounds you are hearing are indicative of hypnagogia as well. Hypnagogic imagery is often auditory or has an auditory component. Like the visuals, hypnagogic sounds vary in intensity from faint impressions to loud noises, such as crashes and bangs (exploding head syndrome). People may imagine their own name called or a doorbell ringing. Typical examples include a feeling of being crushed or suffocated, electric ‘tingles’ or ‘vibrations’, imagined speech and other noises, the imagined presence of a visible or invisible entity, and sometimes intense emotion: fear or euphoria and orgasmic feelings. Basically, if you concentrate and are completely focused in on something expecting to hear a sound or even see something, the brain tends to make it happen. What you have experienced is common and you shouldn't worry at all about it unless new symptoms arise or it is a recurring phenomena. Your mind is playing tricks on you and it is understandable to be scared as you feel completely defenseless as a result of the HSP. Don't worry.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Wow, I hate to even say this or scare you but this too use to happen to me and it ended up being petit seizures, which later developed into gran mal seizures. It's more common than one thinks and I had the petit seizures on and off for years and would assume they were nightmares. I wouldn't jump the gun or anything, but it wouldn't hurt to see a neurologist. I remember my experience and later in turned into not remembering anything until the next morning and staring at the bed wondering, "What happened in my sleep last night?" I knew something happened but no clue and again, later was diagnosed epileptic. Again, I don't mean to scare you but rather educate you and should you start getting weird deja vus (that was what happened when they started while I was awake) please talk to a neurologist. Again, the earlier reply can be exactly what it is, but it can never hurt to talk to a neurologist regarding what you're experiencing to rule things out. Good luck.
    KQuinn 11 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi,when you sleep if u gone in fresh mind.. you are afraid in alone sleep. when you heard that anyone will knock the door that is just your mind senses that someone has here.. so you not sleep completely well this indications.... you always think positive thoughts...... you just keep up practice. Sushil Kumar
    jazdmarkets2 4 Replies Flag this Response
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