Discussions By Condition: Muscle conditions

Toddler can no longer walk

Posted In: Muscle conditions 2 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • September 8, 2006
  • 00:04 PM

My 2.5 year old son was able to walk (developed normally) until just before his 2nd birthday at which time he began to limp and then would not walk at all. We took him to the hospital where he had an ultrasound and was diagnosed with irritable hip. We were advised to rest him. After a few weeks he was able to walk again. Within a month he stopped walking again and has not been able to walk since.

His right leg was in permament spasm from the hip to the toes meaning he was also not able to balance even when sitting.

He has had an MRI scan and is having physiotherapy and hydrotherapy.

The MRI scan results just came back, his brain and spine are completely normal.

About 3 weeks before his MRI scan, he had a massive seizure in his right leg which lasted for around 2 hours and was treated at A&E with diazepam. Since the seizure, his leg is no longer convulsed/spasmed and is now in the same state as his left leg, ie. pretty much normal.

But the issues with the balance and the walking (ie. he cant balance when sitting, he cannot stand and cannot walk) still remain.

What makes matters worse is that he has RAS (reflexive anoxic syndrome) where he holds his breath until he passes out when he is distressed. This means that putting him down, in the bath, or trying any of his physio exercises stimulates his RAS and he passes out.

So we are back to square one. Our son still cant walk, and we have no idea why.

Has anyone else experienced this or similar?

We have been assured that the RAS and the walking are not connected.

(Have posted this in neurological as well)

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2 Replies:

  • Has your child been screened for Legg-Calve-Perthes’ disease? I believe it is more common in boys than girls. My sister was diagnosed at the age of 5. Hers started with a limp. Luckily - we had a great family doctor who was an advocate for his patients. He told my parents that he suspected Perthes and sent them to an Orthopaedic specialist. Xrays confirmed and my sister had to use crutches and a leg brace for several years (approx 4 years). Since it was caught in time, she made a complete recovery. Today, she is a very healthy - very active 41 year old mother of 3 and can run with the best of them.I realize you mentioned that your son has been through many tests. I do not know what irritable hip means specifically. I just remember that before my sister was diagnosed, we would be walking to school and she would just stop. She would cry and tell me she could not walk. I would beg her to keep going because I did not want us to be late. This happened several times before my parents realize it was physical and not her just disliking her 1st grade teacher. She literally could not walk on that leg.Best of luck to you. I know how difficult it can be to see your children in pain and discomfort.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • November 9, 2006
    • 05:23 AM
    • 0
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  • my son is now coming up for 14, he was diagnosed with epilepsy at 5 months old, but despite the seizures he developed normally up to age 2. he then started becoming unsteady on his legs (along with losing speech and stopping developing properly mentally) but continued to walk (a bit unsteady at times due to wide gate, and feet going over ) but he got around and managed stairs too until age 9, then he just stopped. dont know why to this day. he has over laxisity of the limbs but doctors have tested his legs/hips etc.. and can see no reason why he can not use his legs to walk. he has been wheelchair bound for near 5 years now and we too just dont understand why? i hope all works out well for your child. kind regards.
    raymae 21 Replies
    • November 18, 2006
    • 08:04 PM
    • 0
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