Discussions By Condition: Muscle conditions

Pectus Carinatum

Posted In: Muscle conditions 3 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • June 17, 2007
  • 05:41 PM

My son, who is 16 years old developed Pectus Carinatum (pigeon chest) during his puberty. We have been to two orthopedic surgeons and one of them told us that his condition would improve if he exercised his pectorals. The other told us that exercising would only enhance his condition and make it worse. Please, could anyone give us any suggestions?

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  • Have a look at pectus.org for info about this. As long as your son is generally healthy this should not be a problem. It can be caused by scoliosis however it is a common trait in two genetic conditions Marfans syndrome and Poland syndrome. A person with Marfans syndrome usually has the following symptoms though not necessarily all. Persons with Marfan syndrome are usually tall with long, thin arms and legs and spider-like fingers -- a condition called arachnodactyly. When they stretch out their arms, the length of their arms is significantly greater than their height.Other symptoms include: * Highly arched palate and crowded teeth * Nearsightedness * Dislocation of the lens of the eye * Funnel chest (pectus excavatum) or pigeon breast (pectus carinatum) * Scoliosis * Flat feet * Learning disability * Thin, narrow face * Micrognathia (small lower jaw) * Coloboma of iris * HypotoniaPoland syndrome is even more rare than Marfans syndrome. The following is symptoms and signs of the condition. Clinical Signs of Poland's SyndromeVery Frequent Signs abnormal gastrointestinal tract (digestive system) absent pectoral muscles (muscles of the chest) brachydactyly (shortness of the fingers) dextrocardia (heart is on the right side of the body) diaphragmatic hernia/defect humerus (bone of the upper arm) absent/abnormal liver/biliary tract anomalies maternal diabetes oligodactyly (missing fingers) radius (bone of the lower arm) absent/abnormal rhizomelic micromelia syndactyly of fingers (fused together) ulna (bone of the lower arm) absent/abnormal upper limb asymmetry (arms not symmetrical)Frequent Signs abnormal rib hypoplastic (underdeveloped)/absent nipples scapula (shoulder blade) anomalyOccasional Signs agenesis/hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of kidneys encephalocele/exencephaly (prutrusion of brain tissue) abnormal morphology of hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis abnormal function of hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis microcephaly (smaller circumference of head) preaxial polydactyly ureteric anomalies (reflux/duplex system) vertebral segmentation anomaly
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  • Dear Midge,Thank you very much for your informative reply. With regards to your information, it is very likely that our son developed this p.c. due to his slouching. I have now contacted a personal trainer and he told me that he is going to give him special taining to correct his posture and widen his ribcage.(Not enlarging the pectoral muscles).Thanks and Regards,Tanya
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Look into bracing for his pectus carinatum along with an exercise program.www.PectusServices.comDear Midge,Thank you very much for your informative reply. With regards to your information, it is very likely that our son developed this p.c. due to his slouching. I have now contacted a personal trainer and he told me that he is going to give him special taining to correct his posture and widen his ribcage.(Not enlarging the pectoral muscles).Thanks and Regards,Tanya
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 24, 2007
    • 06:06 PM
    • 0
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