Discussions By Condition: Muscle conditions

IN PAIN Of the Osgood Slaughters persuasion

Posted In: Muscle conditions 9 Replies
  • Posted By: GraphxGirl
  • October 22, 2006
  • 05:17 PM

I'm a 23 year old female who lead quite the active lifestyle growing up. I participated in just about every sport a girl could, and my father was a physical fitness nut. By the age of 10, I was already on a daily routine workout schedule with my twin brother. I grew like your average girl, but hit my peak in the 5th grade, I've been 5'3 ever since.
Now, with all that said...when I was young, I can't remember the exact age, but I was in middle school, I complained alot about my right knee. So at my annual physical, I expressed that to the Doc. He checked me out, told my dad some stuff, and the next day we were at a specialist for knees *I'm guessing*
The doctor there poked and pushed and moved and flexed my right leg/knee. And came to the conlclusion that I had something called Osgood Slaughters Disease. Keep in mind, this was probably about 10 years ago. The pain in my knee came and went. If I rested well before practice or games or any real strenious activity the pain wasnt too bad. And i dont remember it ever being as bad as it is today.
Now at 23, and not so physical, *i do yoga once a week and stay busy with full time courses at school and a full time graphc design job, so im mostly sitting* my knee is bothering me more and more every day. I try resting it, icing it, bracing it. . . taking over the counter pain medicine. . . NOTHING SEEMS TO BE WORKING.
As a matter of fact, just as I sit here typing this, my knee is in pain. Keeping it straight and slightly elevated sorta helps, but doesnt make the pain stop. Its like a deep, warm, not so much throbbing, but constant pain. Just below my knee cap, where I can actually feel a lump. A difference in my knees, my right knee as a lump where my left knee doesnt. Its slightly swollen and walking doesnt bother is too much, but squatting and lots of bending or running and even riding a bike REALLY irritates it.
Is there anyting I can do before I take this more seriously, and go to a doctor?
PLEASE HELP!!:cool:

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9 Replies:

  • I have the same thing. The doctors dont spend much time on it but i did get them to MRi it and they said that i had a torn muniscus (bad speller sorry) and that was whats causing all the internal pain. When i smack my Osgood lump on somthing it really hurts but the internal pain is the muniscus. It typically hurts going down hills, stairs and such lie that. If it pops or locks up occasionally then thats what it probably is. I have rehab to stregthen other muscles and surgury later to replace it. Hope that helps.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Have you ever tried any anti-inflammatory drug? It should help. I had a problem once with my ankle (it was stiff and when it popped it hurt like ***l) and went to the local pharmacy where I got a drug that was a joint pain cure. At least that was what the pharmacist told me. It worked like a charm.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I had OS when I was young as well. My mother recently told me that the doctors said that it could reoccur. I recently tore a tendon in the same knee, my mom kept telling me to tell my doctor, so I just looked it up. The lump had returned a while back but seems to have gone down in recent weeks. Anyway, the reports that I have read says that this is a problem that occurs in children before adolescence. It says that it usually goes away once the growth line fuses. So I doubt that it is a condition that can occur later in life. However, my doctor did tell me the Motrin/Ibuprofen can help reduce inflammation as well as take care of pain. So I would look into the fact that you could very well have a condition that is even worse, especially if it has been on going. Although there is the possibility that you tore a tendon, didn't realize it and it will not go away unless you stay off of it, keep it elevated for a week.. but most of all, try to see a doctor. It could even be a degenerative condition. (yes, I'm mostly saying that to scar you into seeing the doctor...but I suppose it could be true!!!)Also, I have not talked to my doctor yet about this as I keep forgetting. So last time, I left a note. LOL.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 21, 2008
    • 11:16 PM
    • 0
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  • I have Osgood Schlatters as well. I believe it started when I was in 6th grade. I am 38 years old now-still have it. I can not keep my leg bent for too long or do anything that puts too much pressure on it-such as lunges, stair climbing, etc., hitting it on something will bring about excruciating pain. I was diagnosed at age of 15 and was told by my dr. if I didn't slow down he'd put me in full leg brace-so I slowed down. I never had surgery on it-was told it could come back. I think maybe with this condition that fluid buildup on affected knee is a higher risk and could cause problems with pain. The best thing to do is rest the knee, don't leave bent or locked up for extended periods, lunges should not be done on affected knee. I understand it is difficult to stop being active but limits to activity need to be done. I have found that when flare ups occur-a naproxen, such as aleve helps. If rest on the knee doesn't help after a few days, I would see a dr. to see if there is something else going on with knee.
    wyldflower 3 Replies
    • October 4, 2008
    • 00:34 PM
    • 0
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  • If you are still having knee problems, you should probably see your doctor to determine what is causing your current difficulty. It would seem that OSD is not the cause of the pain you are experiencing now.The mayoclinic.com site has a lot of good information about the condition, which is correctly written "Osgood Schlatter Disease." They note that: "This is a temporary condition that improves with treatment and activity modification and that it goes away as children grow older." Further, "ven after symptoms have resolved, a 'bump' on the tibia in the area of the swelling may remain. This bump may persist to some degree throughout your child's life, but it isn't a cause for concern because it won't interfere with knee function, though the affected knee may look a bit different than your child's other knee." Additionally, the following information is taken from: http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/97820/osgood_slaughter_disease_growing_pains.html?cat=5 Osgood Schlatter Disease is the inflammation of the patellar tendon where the knee meets the top of the tibia (shinbone). The condition is caused by stress on the tendon that attaches the muscle at the front of the thigh to the tibia. It is caused by the muscle pulling on the tendon, for example during running activities and other sports, gymnastics and ballet.Symptoms are swelling and tenderness in the knee joint. It is most common in active children aged 10-15. It is the most common source of knee pain in children. Both males and females are equally vulnerable. The three main factors of the disease are:1. The child is between 10 and 15 years old2. The child is involved in youth sports3. The child is in a ‘growth spurt’The 'disease' was named after two physicians who defined it in 1903. In a Finnish research study, it was found that 13% of the teenagers in Finland had symptoms of Osgood Schlatter Disease. About 2 million boys and girls in the United States contract Osgood Schlatter Disease yearly.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 10, 2008
    • 04:35 PM
    • 0
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  • Also, Wyldflower, please note that regardless if someone had OSD as a child, using the correct "form" while doing lunges (or any other strengthening excercise) is critical. Bad form can very quickly cause extensive damage. A (good) personal trainer can be very important, especially when first starting out, to help you develop proper posture and form throughout your movements. Absent a trainer, it can be helpful to have a good training partner - coupled with research of the proper form of the movement - and to pay careful attention to what your body is telling you. (Also please note that some seemingly well meaning magazines and other information sources generate and perpetuate bad exercises and bad forms of good exercises that can create a Lot of muscle and joint strain and damage, especially to vulnerable knee and shoulder joints.) One may not need to give up activity and exercises, but instead just practice them properly.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 10, 2008
    • 04:50 PM
    • 0
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  • Registeredun Thank you for your input on OSD. I have never really done much research on it. I do still have a lump there, have been told it is a calcium buildup, caused by OS. It appeared in 6th grade and never went away. I do exercise, just can't put too much pressure on it. I have seen a dr. and they said they could scrape off the calcium but it could build up again, so I thought it less painful to deal with it this way and just try to be careful. I am a fairly fit person, I do exercise, just not lunges. Anyway, since this does not always cause me serious problems, I do not worry about it too much. Thank you for your concern, it makes me feel good that other people do care enough to reply and explain things to me. Wyldflower
    wyldflower 3 Replies
    • December 18, 2008
    • 02:54 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I had OS when I was young as well. My mother recently told me that the doctors said that it could reoccur. I recently tore a tendon in the same knee, my mom kept telling me to tell my doctor, so I just looked it up. The lump had returned a while back but seems to have gone down in recent weeks. Anyway, the reports that I have read says that this is a problem that occurs in children before adolescence. It says that it usually goes away once the growth line fuses. So I doubt that it is a condition that can occur later in life. However, my doctor did tell me the Motrin/Ibuprofen can help reduce inflammation as well as take care of pain. So I would look into the fact that you could very well have a condition that is even worse, especially if it has been on going. Although there is the possibility that you tore a tendon, didn't realize it and it will not go away unless you stay off of it, keep it elevated for a week.. but most of all, try to see a doctor. It could even be a degenerative condition. (yes, I'm mostly saying that to scar you into seeing the doctor...but I suppose it could be true!!!)Also, I have not talked to my doctor yet about this as I keep forgetting. So last time, I left a note. LOL.My Son was operated on ( twice) for this dis. as both of his legs were affected, & his knees gave out on him while just walking to the store! The pain was terrible. First surgery was when he was teen. Second one after he was married, so it doesn't always "just go away" with age! The operations were necessary because his was serious with the appearance of knee bones on each leg ( bone growth ) He wasn't born with the dis. nor was he into Sports! One Dr. said "you can get it after bedrest or inactivity if you then become active too quickly! My Son was forced to kneel on rice for lengthy periods of time!My husband ( his father ) was cruel to all of us, & I finally divorced him as was worsening each year! Good Luck from one who hurt along with her Son!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, I am a physical therapist. It is not uncommon for very young but active kids to develop OS. As this stage in your life I would image that you are either having pain associated with the knee cap itself or patella tendonitis. If you were my patient I would utilize ice, anti-inflammatory medications or creams, and avoid any aggravating activity. I would also seriously consider also doing hip strengthening exercises as many anterior knee issues are related to biomechanical aspects that are aggravated with hip weakness. For specific exercises you can visit http://www.joint-pain-solutions.com/knee-cap-pain.html Hope this helps and good luck. ~JTrempe PT, ATC
    JTrempe 101 Replies Flag this Response
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