Discussions By Condition: Muscle conditions

flat foot reconstruction..3 months post-op, STILL PAIN!!!

Posted In: Muscle conditions 13 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • August 20, 2007
  • 05:51 AM

I was just hoping to find someone that has experienced,or known someone who has experienced prolonged post-op pain from flat foot reconstruction.My suregon thinks it's all in my head....and it is not.

I started PT at the beginning of the month,and it is very painful.Along with the pain,there is "uncomfortable sensations" on all of my incisions.Also,my heel burns all of the time....especially during PT,as well as calf cramping.

As a matter of fact,while I write this,the bottom of my heel burns,radiating to the ball of my foot,along with a cramp in my calf.

Not only do I experience this at PT,I experience this all day.It is so depressing.And it takes so much energy out of me.

Please,if anybody has some feedback,please reply.

Thanks:)

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13 Replies:

  • This link http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/pes_planus_flat_foot Has a lot of info about flat feet and correction. I'd never heard of an operation for this before, but that could be because I have Ehlers Danlos and they shouldn't do this type of operate on us. I'm also fine using inserts and ankle braces to ease my problem
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 26, 2007
    • 04:12 PM
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  • This link http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/pes_planus_flat_foot Has a lot of info about flat feet and correction. I'd never heard of an operation for this before, but that could be because I have Ehlers Danlos and they shouldn't do this type of operate on us. I'm also fine using inserts and ankle braces to ease my problem Thankyou for the reply,Midge I understand about flat feet.....what I don't understand is whyI am still experiencing pain three months after the reconstruction Depending on the seriousness of the flat foot,and depending on how long conservative treatment has failed,flat foot reconstruction is a very common procedure. I get so frustrated by peoples' feedback when it comes to this problem,because I get the feeling that most people concider this a "wastebasket" problem,and concider the diagnosis of flat feet problems ie:plantar fasciitis,tibial tendonitis,neuritis,stress fractures,fibromititis,tarsal tunnel syndrome....etc, a "wastebasket"diagnosis.(I have suffered all of these over a span of many years) I sincerley need some feedback as to why I am experiencing this pain after I had a procedure done to fix these problems..... Again,thankyou for the reply Midge,and I wish you painfree days,as well as happy ones:) lexi468
    lexi468 2 Replies
    • August 29, 2007
    • 06:13 PM
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  • Hi Lexi, The link should contain info why the op could go wrong. I can't get it to open at present to make sure I posted right one because I have a new computer and just getting used to the settings. If you recheck the jargon I'm sure it was at the bottom. I know loads of yada yada to get through first before you get to the juicy bit. :D I know what you mean about problems with flat feet that is where all my problems started. I used to be a UK size 7 shoe and now I'm a 5 because they have rolled in on themselves so much. Not that I'm complaining about the better looking shoes and not looking like I could sail in my footwear, but the pain and lack of balance hardly makes up for it.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 7, 2007
    • 08:01 PM
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  • Hi Lexi sorry to hear you are having a rough time. three months is not a long time when you are recovering from reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation always involves some pain and orthopedic surgery cannot always restore a joint to normal pain free function, having said that it does sound like your pain is more server than it should be, and your i don't think your orthopedic surgeon should be saying your pain is in your head.I haven't had the procedure so there is no way i can tell if you are just experiencing normal pain ( i would think that the rehab for this type of procedure would be pretty painful ) or if things are not going well.There are many different types of flatfoot reconstructions can you say what specific procedure's you have had done ie, any fused joints or tendon transfers.Here's some text from an emedicene article as well as the link to the full article http://www.emedicine.com/orthoped/topic540.htm complicationsWhile some complications associated with treatment of adult-acquired flatfoot deformities may be related to poor surgical planning and improper choice of procedure, others may be inherently related to the procedure itself. For example, a flatfoot deformity secondary to an arthritic Lisfranc joint may be wrongly diagnosed as a PTT-deficient foot and therefore be treated as such. Other complications may be related to inadequate surgical intervention. For example, tenodesis of the FDL to the diseased PTT proved to have a failure rate of 50% after 2 years (Michelson, 1992). Similar long-term failure rates were noted for FDL transfers to the navicular performed for stage 2 PTT dysfunction (Neufeld, 2001). Bony procedures such as a calcaneal osteotomy and various arthrodeses can also be associated with significant complications. Although nonunion of the calcaneal osteotomy is exceedingly rare, placement of the transosteotomy screw can be associated with postoperative morbidity. Penetration of the subtalar joint or a prominent screw head may cause postoperative symptoms. Risks associated with a triple arthrodesis include nonunion, in some cases in excess of 20%, and also malposition, both in hindfoot alignment and forefoot rotation (Neufeld, 2001). Longer-term complications involve arthrosis of adjacent joints. OUTCOME AND PROGNOSIS Proper treatment of this condition requires a comprehensive knowledge of foot biomechanics and astute clinical judgment. No single solution is appropriate for all patients and degree of dysfunction; rather, a continuum of treatment options must be considered to gain the best functional outcome for the patient. The patients best suited for optimal return to full function have mild changes of the dynamic structures but maintenance of the static restraints of the hindfoot. These patients are most tolerant of nonoperative treatment modalities and, if surgery is necessary, can reasonably expect a return to near normal function result if joint sparing options are utilized.futures and controversiesPTT insufficiency with different degrees of deformity at different joints in the foot is a challenge to manage. Considerable controversy remains about the appropriate treatment of all stages of PTT dysfunction. Comparison outcomes trials are needed to provide better data for evaluation of the treatment options. These trials have not been completed to date.Good luck Lexi wishing you a successful recovery.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 8, 2007
    • 04:05 AM
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  • I sincerely need some feedback as to why I am experiencing this pain after I had a procedure done to fix these problems..... Most doctors don't really address or seem to believe that patients can have post-operative pain for months after a surgery...I think this can be a much more common problem than is documented. My experience was both similar and different to yours - I had surgery to remove an ovarian cyst - but I had the EXACT same amount of pain after surgery as before surgery for many months afterwards...it is certainly very frustrating. Chinese medicine usually diagnoses this type of pain as blood stasis, when your "Qi" and blood stagnate at the sight of the surgery. Have you considered trying acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine to help with your recovery? I think it would be helpful. There are some good Chinese medicinals that address post operative pain - find a good NCCAOM certified practitioner who specializes in Herbal therapy. Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • September 8, 2007
    • 03:50 PM
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  • When I read this I thought I would alert you do what I have experienced. While this has absolutely nothing to do with the ankle, it has to do with PAIN, BURNING pain.I had a surgery (rib resection) 3 years ago. The area never got better. I developed reflex sympathetic dystrophy in my left side. This occurs in people where they have had trauma (sometimes basic trauma) in an area but has increased pain disappropriated pain in the area. I have horrible burning pain, swelling and just incredible pain in my left side. I have sensitivity in my arm so that the ceiling fan hurts my arm. My cat will walk by my arm and her fur hurts. I have stabbing, horrible pain. I also have horrible muscle cramping and tremors.I know this has nothing to do with your current problem, so it sounds like it wouldn't apply. Take a few seconds and read about it. You can also get RSD from surgery (as i did). Unfortunately, RSD is chronic in my situation. I would hope that you take very seriously the pain that you're in. See a pain specialist who can diagnose this now. If this is what you have, the longer you go undiagnosed (as I did - I went 2.5 years) the less of a chance a treatment will put it in remission. Please know that the pain isn't in your head. I think it's horrible when a physician says that to people. I was told that for 2.5 years when I had RSD the whole time and could have got treatment.Good luck.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 12, 2007
    • 06:36 PM
    • 0
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  • I'm 16 and had my second reconstructive surgery over a year ago and am just now starting to run again (with pain). It's a lot of soreness but the pain now doesnt compare to the pain that could be caused in the future if i didnt have the surgery (knees, hips, etc.). It's a serious surgery and takes a lot of rehab and recovery time.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, I am a physical therapist. In my experience, reconstructions for flat feet do not progress quickly after surgery. Healing takes a long time. It also sounds like your nerves are hypersensitive which is common around surgical incision sites. I would hope you are doing some desensitization activities....ask your PT about it if you are not. I wish I had better news but unfortunately surgeons have a tendency of minimizing how long recovery from this surgery is. If your surgeon is not giving you good answers (the pain being 'all in your head' is terrible if you ask me), get a second opinion. For more information about other foot treatment ideas, visit: http://www.joint-pain-solutions.com/foot-joint-pain.html Good luck.
    JTrempe 101 Replies Flag this Response
  • I had flat foot reconstruction 4 and 1/2 mos. ago. It has been an ordeal. The pain in the beginning was horrible. I had a deep venous thrombosis as a complication. This is supposed to be rare, but it happened to me. This has caused swelling and I now need to wear a compression stocking. Now I am in PT, which has been beneficial. Ice is always helpful for ongoing pain. At this point, I am more optimistic than I have been since I had the surgery. I have only recently been able to take a few steps without crutches. Anyone who contemplates this surgery should rethink doing it and get multiple surgical opinions.I know the original blogger was several years ago, but their and the others' comments are still relevant.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I am 4 months post op a triple arthro with achilles lengthening due to my flat feet. I too experience alot of what you are - I think it because they cut alot of nerves as part of this surgery and until those heal, we experience the burning ( I can hardly stand the tightness of a shoe!) I also still have major swelling of my ankle (this is surgery #3 and I've never had swelling like this!). I still don't have a heal toe foot movement and feel there is some sort of constriction in the front of my ankle and don't know if I will ever walk normal. I am currently trying Sketcher Shape ups for shoes to get more of a heal toe movement and I feel they do help some. I'm not sure I would go though this again if this is all I get from this very expensive surgery...I am going to allow it a little more healing time and hope things get better. I too have the calf tightness and now my knee is starting to act up because of the lack of correct gait. I wish you luck with your recovery.JKI was just hoping to find someone that has experienced,or known someone who has experienced prolonged post-op pain from flat foot reconstruction.My suregon thinks it's all in my head....and it is not. I started PT at the beginning of the month,and it is very painful.Along with the pain,there is "uncomfortable sensations" on all of my incisions.Also,my heel burns all of the time....especially during PT,as well as calf cramping.As a matter of fact,while I write this,the bottom of my heel burns,radiating to the ball of my foot,along with a cramp in my calf. Not only do I experience this at PT,I experience this all day.It is so depressing.And it takes so much energy out of me.Please,if anybody has some feedback,please reply.Thanks:)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 5, 2010
    • 02:36 AM
    • 0
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  • In April 2010, I had reconstructive flat foot surgery. Basically, my heel was cut and moved over a screwed in place. A cadaver bone was placed in the middle of my foot for more stabilization and my tendon was lengthened and pinned back in place. I was in physical therapy for 6 months and somehow I injured myself. I am in an insane amount of pain and the Podiatrist is saying it is neroma. I started steroid injections today with no relieve. I am wondering if anyone else has taken this long to recover. I was also recently diagnosed with osteoporosis and wonder if this would have anything to do with it? Thanks
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
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  • I had flat foot reconstruction in mid May. 6 weeks non weight bearing. Started PT in the beginning of July transition to shoes started in August and still in progress. PT until the end of September. Dr. and PT say the pain will get better as my leg and foot get use to working correctly. Pain has improved immensely mostly it's just the new hardware and tenderness of the back of my heel bothering me these days. It sounds like it could be next May before I see total improvement. Still icing and elevating and wearing a compression sock. Sleeping in night boot once in awhile too. It's a hard and long recovery!
    Anonymous 1 Replies
    • September 4, 2015
    • 04:21 AM
    • 0
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  • Do you still have numbness in your foot? I am 3 momths post op flat foot reconstruction and have numbness in the heel and sole of my foot along with the lateral aspect. I am praying this will resolve.
    Anonymous 1 Replies Flag this Response
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