Discussions By Condition: Mental conditions

The Personality Disorder debate...

Posted In: Mental conditions 5 Replies
  • Posted By: WhiskeyClone
  • March 1, 2007
  • 09:46 PM

What distinguishes a personality disorder from a personality? For example, if some one is a detached person who shows very little emotion, when is that just a personality instead of a disorder?

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5 Replies:

  • The fine print definition I always see at the end of any diagnosing information regarding personality disorder includes: "to the point of causing extreme social disfunction and/or limitation." So, if you are happy, well adjusted, and a functional member of society, I think you can be as odd as you like without qualifying under any disorder. When the quirks become barriers to normal activity, there's a potential problem. This assumes that functioning in our modern type of society is 'normal' behaviour, I think that's a suspicious definition personally :)
    Azaral 152 Replies Flag this Response
  • i think this is a very serious ,and important question.,with many dimensions,and many implications.one of the determinants is the background of mores and norms against which the personality in question appears. some societies seem more tolerant of human diversity than others.some value diversity :some are threatened by it. some value creativity,some fear it.some value the violent individual,some do not.there is a lot of ambivalence(and hypocricy), on this last point.it isnt simple.epilepsy was /(is?)valued in some societies,as a means, among other things, of divination!it does seem to be a bit of a lottery.unusual people should take care which society they are born into!but this isnt all there is to it.........interesting to know if there are personality manifestations(i exclude here aberrant behaviour traceable to disorders associated with brain damage ,or chemical abnormality where the proper question perhaps should be "is it a personality in the first place?")which are not tolerated by any society. .....inhibition of the wish to kill,for instance,should we regard its absence as an indicator of an organism so disabled as not to qualify as a personality in the first place? in other words do we regard the mass killer as an ordinary person with an odd ,reprehensible hobby or as something so incomplete as to be not identifiably human?what we do in such circumstances is another test of our own humanity,of course.i wish there were no disagreement about that,but it is sadly easier to identify the disordered society ,than the disordered personality.it is the society which is cruel to those individuals it can not approve or understand:a little though important test of civilisation.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • If you think my personality stinks you should smell my finger.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • another fetal alcohol syndrome baby here,i think." the yeast was not put in that makes the human bread." sorry,i cant help you,but i hope the moderator allows your post to stand as an example of what i mean . incidentally,i doubt if you are right ,even about this.most of us would prefer the finger.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
  • If you think my personality stinks you should smell my finger.Clarification Please! 'If you think my personality stinks you should smell my finger'. Could the unregistered person explain alittle more!
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies Flag this Response
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