Discussions By Condition: Mental conditions

Food/Vitamins cure depression?

Posted In: Mental conditions 22 Replies
  • Posted By: Pink_Panther27
  • January 12, 2010
  • 08:04 PM

For some time I have had problems with depression and anxiety and at this point don't know what to really do about it.

-I'm not interested and do not have the money to take multiple prescription drugs.

-Seeing a counselor every now and then has done squat.

-A while ago I stumbled onto something called EFT (emotional freedom techniques), which in a nut shell is like accupuncture for your subtle energy system. When I heard about it, it sounded strange, but did it anyway. At least for a while it seemed like it helped, but now I'm not sure.

More recently just browsing through several books I have on juicing and the various foods and vitamins for reducing stress, (etc.) I'm wondering if anyone here can testify to taking vitamins for "curing" their depression/anxiety.

Among those that I have heard: B vitamin complex, fish oil (omaga 3), magnesium are suppose to help.

Cellery is suppose to be rich in B vitamins and has sedative like qualities--it seems after nibbling on some cellery I'm more able to chill out; however the effect it has depending on my level of stress can be very short lived.

I have also been wondering if part of this is being brought on by my menstrual cycle, but given how my PMS symptoms prior, during and after are varied and inconsistent it is hard to know for sure.

P_P27

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22 Replies:

  • For almost the past two weeks I have been taking a regiment of Fish Oil (pill form) and a vitamin B-Complex. Except for the first 1-2 days I feel good. I have been more relaxed, friendlier and extroverted than is typical and I actually feel happy (something which is quite rare or unheard of for me). However as all good as all this sounds I shouldn’t claim victory just yet. When some really big stressful event does come along I’ll have a better idea of how effective my vitamin regiment really is. I may only feel good right now because I have reason to be optimistic and in general things haven’t been as crazy-stressful as seems to be the norm. Believing that information from books and online sources is at best a supplement for a medical opinion I have an appointment scheduled with a doctor to find out what they think. Based on results so far and what relevant information I have been able to dig it seems more than likely I am doing something right. Stress leads to à insufficient levels of B vitamins that support the function of the adrenals and lower energy levels, alters our bodies chemistry and reduces or outright inhibits the formation of chemicals linked to regulating our mood à contributes to/causes depression To be continued...
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies
    • January 28, 2010
    • 09:08 PM
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  • Forgot to add this to 2nd post. As far as I know there is not strong conclusive evidence for it, but I have heard there is some evidence to suggest an imbalance of omega 3's and 6's can cause depression. So that is why I am also taking the fish oil in addition to the B-Complex. I am tempted to take myself off the fish oil to see if it is the B-Complex that is helping, but I think I'll hold off on making any alterations for a few weeks. Though on the basis I was taking a fish oil supplement to cut down on inflammation from a connective tissue injury to my foot and I don't recall being uplifted in my mood it probably is the B-vitamins.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies
    • January 28, 2010
    • 11:36 PM
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  • Well the inevitable happened…the level of stress picked up and I psychologically crashed. I am pretty sure I am onto something, but figuring what is a proper dosage might take some time. Fortunately I have my doctors appointment Tuesday this week.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies
    • February 9, 2010
    • 00:30 AM
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  • Well my appointment was what I feared it would turn out to be: less than helpful. I am currently a student attending University and don't have the funds to see a private doctor so I went to the student clinic on campus. I was expecting to see a doctor, but got a physician's assistant instead. For a large portion of the appointment she was basically pitching to me that I should be seeing a counselor or evaluated by a psychologist/psychiatrist. I know there is a lot of crap going on in my life that is stressing me out, but I cannot do a whole ***n lot about it right now and counseling has done nothing for me. What has helped (however fleeting) is the supplements I have been taking. I hate to pay the out of pocket expense, but given the less than fruitful appointment I am going to consult with a naturopath and see what insight they might offer on the matter.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies
    • February 9, 2010
    • 07:57 PM
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  • Eating properly is a very big condition in depression..
    josephajain 7 Replies
    • February 16, 2010
    • 09:41 AM
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  • I have an appointment set for Friday this week. Hopefully it will yield some useful insights.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies
    • February 23, 2010
    • 11:07 PM
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  • I have heard that taking a 5HTP supplement (available in any vitamin aisle) helps ease depression.
    Plastikfear 64 Replies
    • February 27, 2010
    • 11:05 PM
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  • Well I was hoping I would be able to kill 3 birds with 1 appointment, but didn't work out that way. For the past month or so I have been dealing with a muscular skeletal injury that has been flaring up, which is what the appointment ended up focusing on. And since Monday my GI track has been acting up: abdominal pain, burping, stools that are less than well formed. So, I will need to schedule a separate appointment to discuss my stress/anxiety and depression issues. In the mean time I have found a good book that should give me some solid guidelines so I can draw up a plan for modifying my diet: Food & Mood: The Complete Guide to Eating Well and Feeling Your Best by Elizabeth Somer. A lot of what I have read so far seems to coroborate what I have found from online sources, but provides greater context, depth and guidelines for revising your diet to suite your individual circumstances. The only thing that bugs me about the book is I already eat a pretty well rounded, nutritious diet with plenty of fuits, veggies, limited processed foods, caffine and alcohol. So I am wondering if following "The Feeling Good Diet" is really going to change things. I suppose it is all the more reason to get a consult from a naturopath.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies Flag this Response
  • Well I was hoping I would be able to kill 3 birds with 1 appointment, but didn't work out that way. For the past month or so I have been dealing with a muscular skeletal injury that has been flaring up, which is what the appointment ended up focusing on. And since Monday my GI track has been acting up: abdominal pain, burping, stools that are less than well formed. The only thing that bugs me about the book is I already eat a pretty well rounded, nutritious diet with plenty of fuits, veggies, limited processed foods, caffine and alcohol. So I am wondering if following "The Feeling Good Diet" is really going to change things. I suppose it is all the more reason to get a consult from a naturopath.Consulting a naturopath is good. Because it may help you in your diet plan. I think eating the right food may not help sometimes.
    John Victor 1 Replies Flag this Response
  • Consulting a naturopath is good. Because it may help you in your diet plan. I think eating the right food may not help sometimes. Even with modifications to my diet I don’t really expect I’m going to be happy-happy-joy-joy all the time and I think the author of the book says that herself. Following the guidelines for the diet your mood should be more stable and consistent avoiding the extreme lows. I have not started seriously implementing the dietary suggestions, but I’ve been trying to incorporate some of the foods she says you should have one to servings a day of, for example for fruit she says you should have one serving of fruit that is high in vitamin C: orange, grapefruit, kiwi, cantaloupe, etc. There has at least been one occasion recently when having a lunch that included having orange juice improved my mood and energy level.Based on my experiences with counselors I think this approach holds the promise of generating a plan of treatment that can be proven or disproven. With counselors, psychologists and psychiatrists my impression is that there seldom is a definite terminal end point unless the patient self-terminates because it is not going anywhere.And overall I don’t think my problems with anxiety and depression fit into one of the DSM categories. On a daily basis I do not perpetually feel depressed for weeks or months on end. Over the course of a single day my mood will go up, down, rebound, down. Other times I will become very stressed out my mood and ability to concentrate will tank and for the next week or more it just feels like my body is struggling physically and psychologically to regain homeostasis (typically involving withdrawing from stressful activity, doing something other than school related stuff and generally slacking off).I think when I said something to this effect to the physician she suggested I might be bi-polar. :rolleyes::confused::mad:Hmmm….cause and effect does the stressful event come before, after or at the same time as the neurological imbalance of chemicals in my brain.At least when I think of bi-polar I think of someone who’s mood and temperament uncontrollably shifts without regard to input from the environment. In the majority of cases it seems like my depression and anxiety can be traced back to some on-going, prolonged stress.My appointment is scheduled for Monday.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies Flag this Response
  • Would have updated this sooner, but I have been VERY busy. At the conclusion of my appointment they gave me several suggestions: They gave me a homeopathic remedy to take 2 times a day for three days (Ignatia--I believe). They also suggested I would benefit from doing Qi Gong and doing some deep breathing exercises. They did not give me any dietary guidlines--yet, but strongly suggested I keep a journal detailed journal of what and when I'm eating and how I feel before and after eating. I also got some tea that is a special blend composed of nettle, rasberry and some other stuff to help when stressed. I should schedule a follow up appointment, but I'm waiting till I know exactly what my schedule will be this term.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies Flag this Response
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  • More rescently I have been implementing some dietary changes to counter the biological mechanisms that contribute and perpetuate me feeling stressed out and depressed. Based on several rather stressful episodes the past few days I think my ability to bounce back from stress has improved and that is about it. Out of idle curiosity has anyone tried using biofeedback device to address issues of anxeity related to perfectionist tendencies, fear of failure/actualizing failure? Because I'm very tempted to, but am wondering if it will really work because of being context specific.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies Flag this Response
  • Well after an appointment ~3-4 weeks ago at the NCNM clinic and then an appointment yesterday it seems my mood problems may be partially related to a gluten sensitivity. A stool test indicated inflammation related to gluten. There were a number of other indicators that tested positive, but whatever they are it is rare for them to test positive and they need to do research on it. By my next appointment they should have a pretty good idea of where my body is at bio-chemically (thyroid, adrenal function, checking key vitamins and testing for Pyroluria or Pyrrole disorder). For people who are interested in doing more research I would suggest reading: The Mood Cure and I have heard good things about the book Depression Free Naturally and have ordered it.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies Flag this Response
  • Can you share how your results?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 5, 2010
    • 00:40 AM
    • 0
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  • Been there, done what you're doing. I am not in health care but with the years behind me some suggestions would be:First, find mental health support groups/emotions anon/codependents anonymous. Besides the support which is absolutely vital (especially while you're trying to locate professional assistance. do only a little bit everyday so as not to be overwhelmed), the meetings can offer a plethora of knowledge and referrals such as good psychs and/or therapists, etc. You're smart to see that food and allergies can be contributing components. Ask around/check with the health food shops in your area. Find one where the owner is also a licensed nutritionist if possible and talk w/him or her. You need a good one who's just not trying to sell you supplements, again word of mouth helps. He/she should also know about kinesiology and how to "muscle test" supplements/food (this works I've done it), also how supplements can interact w/depression meds; for example no st johns wort if you're taking one. They might also be able to tell you of a GOOD chinese doc or naprapath. I've known a licensed nutritionist, who owns her own shop, for years who's helped me a lot. I have a good therapist, and a good holistic psychiatrist now who offers other treatments than just drugs and we decide together what to try. Also check out these therapies: CBT; Cognitive Behavorial Therapy is one of the best therapy techniques out there; look at Dr. David Burns books (go slow and if need be get your counselor/therapist to work with you on it). Also read up on NET; neuro emotional technique, and DNMS; developmental needs meeting strategy (dnms.org i think). Like you I tried EFT and it wasn't right for me HOWEVER, if you can find someone to help you with it to make sure it's not a viable therapy then you can scratch it off the list and move on. Pull up EFT (emotional feeling technique) online and check out more info. There are other techniques out there like DBT; more for multiple personality disorder but some parts are applicable for general populous. If your mental state becomes bad and you can obtain health insurance there are hospitals that have what's called PHP: partial hospitalization programs and IOP:intensive hospitalization programs. PHP is where you attend a hospital's outpatient mental health program 5 days a week 9a-5p and IOP is a shorter program 9a-12p (the hours can vary a bit). Found out about this through my therapist. I called the surrounding hospitals and asked a lot of questions; how long had the programs been in existence, what type of theraputic techniques used, what was the daily schedule/classes, success/return rates. After all this is your mental health so ask questions. Again, word of mouth also helps. And one last thing, if this is preventing you from working or working full time then file for disability. You need to have psychiatric documentation of your illness however, therapy documentation helps but it's not enough. If you do file be prepared to be denied the first time, appeal is the key. Sadly we are the ones that have to do the work which is why it's so important to have a good support network, do a little at a time and hang in there.For some time I have had problems with depression and anxiety and at this point don't know what to really do about it. -I'm not interested and do not have the money to take multiple prescription drugs. -Seeing a counselor every now and then has done squat. -A while ago I stumbled onto something called EFT (emotional freedom techniques), which in a nut shell is like accupuncture for your subtle energy system. When I heard about it, it sounded strange, but did it anyway. At least for a while it seemed like it helped, but now I'm not sure. More recently just browsing through several books I have on juicing and the various foods and vitamins for reducing stress, (etc.) I'm wondering if anyone here can testify to taking vitamins for "curing" their depression/anxiety. Among those that I have heard: B vitamin complex, fish oil (omaga 3), magnesium are suppose to help. Cellery is suppose to be rich in B vitamins and has sedative like qualities--it seems after nibbling on some cellery I'm more able to chill out; however the effect it has depending on my level of stress can be very short lived. I have also been wondering if part of this is being brought on by my menstrual cycle, but given how my PMS symptoms prior, during and after are varied and inconsistent it is hard to know for sure. P_P27
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 14, 2010
    • 07:56 PM
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  • Where do I begin—it has been a long while since I have updated my post. Well sometime mid to late May I was diagnosed as: -Gluten sensitive (if my understanding is correct taking in substances that you are allergic to or have a sensitivity to can either cause or exacerbate mood problems—if it is the case and I’m able to stay gluten free there should be some improvement within a year to year and a half) -Boarder line hypothyroid -Because of an imbalance of cortisol to DHEA my pancreas is not producing enough digestive enzymes -And when the tests were done my adrenal glands they were severely fatigued or exhausted. Except for the gluten sensitivity I am under the impression all of these can be attributed to severe and prolonged stress. They prescribed a megadose vitamin B complex that also contains a number of minerals (in order to acquire this you would probably have to get tested and have it prescribed), some liquid licorice root extract and a supplement to support my thyroid functioning. It is difficult to tell how much all of this has really helped since I have been continuing to deal with a lot of stress. And now more than ever my future prospects are very uncertain. I have gotten into trouble with my graduate sociology program and am basically trying to salvage my academic career. While finishing the program will not guarantee me a job it certainly is more likely to help than hinder. If things don’t pan out I’ll see if I can’t take a few more advanced classes and then look for full-time work. Right now I’m taking an over the counter vitamin B complex with vitamin C, calcium, vitamin D, cod liver oil. I have been trying to lay off the chocolate and anything caffeinated since it will make my adrenals work harder, which is not good if they are already over taxed. Tulsi tea is alleged to be useful in combating the effects of stress and licorice tea or teas that have some licorice should help me maintain. This probably is not helpful to those who are looking for a definitive answer, but I think the supplements have helped. I don’t think they are a cure all, but have probably helped. To whom ever made the last post…thanks. I’ll copy & paste it, print it and see about looking into a few of the things you have mentioned. As far as I am aware I don’t think there are any actively practicing cognitive-behavior therapists where I live, but finding a hypnotherapist is not a problem. I’ve been dragging my feet about committing to a course of action with too much uncertainty, but once I know where I stand academically I’ll make a decision.
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies
    • September 19, 2010
    • 05:00 AM
    • 0
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  • Where do I begin—it has been a long while since I have updated my post. Well sometime mid to late May I was diagnosed as: -Gluten sensitive (if my understanding is correct taking in substances that you are allergic to or have a sensitivity to can either cause or exacerbate mood problems—if it is the case and I’m able to stay gluten free there should be some improvement within a year to year and a half) -Boarder line hypothyroid -Because of an imbalance of cortisol to DHEA my pancreas is not producing enough digestive enzymes -And when the tests were done my adrenal glands they were severely fatigued or exhausted. Except for the gluten sensitivity I am under the impression all of these can be attributed to severe and prolonged stress. They prescribed a megadose vitamin B complex that also contains a number of minerals (in order to acquire this you would probably have to get tested and have it prescribed), some liquid licorice root extract and a supplement to support my thyroid functioning. It is difficult to tell how much all of this has really helped since I have been continuing to deal with a lot of stress. And now more than ever my future prospects are very uncertain. I have gotten into trouble with my graduate sociology program and am basically trying to salvage my academic career. While finishing the program will not guarantee me a job it certainly is more likely to help than hinder. If things don’t pan out I’ll see if I can’t take a few more advanced classes and then look for full-time work. Right now I’m taking an over the counter vitamin B complex with vitamin C, calcium, vitamin D, cod liver oil. I have been trying to lay off the chocolate and anything caffeinated since it will make my adrenals work harder, which is not good if they are already over taxed. Tulsi tea is alleged to be useful in combating the effects of stress and licorice tea or teas that have some licorice should help me maintain. This probably is not helpful to those who are looking for a definitive answer, but I think the supplements have helped. I don’t think they are a cure all, but have probably helped. To whom ever made the last post…thanks. I’ll copy & paste it, print it and see about looking into a few of the things you have mentioned. As far as I am aware I don’t think there are any actively practicing cognitive-behavior therapists where I live, but finding a hypnotherapist is not a problem. I’ve been dragging my feet about committing to a course of action with too much uncertainty, but once I know where I stand academically I’ll make a decision. perhaps supplementing potassium and vitamin d would be helpfull..also look in to ion channelopathies as these can greatly affect the mental health status,, i have been reading quite a bit on orthomolecular treatment of mental illness as i remember this helped my brother quite a bit back in the 1970s..large doses of vitamins and minerals,, now my family is being genetically evaluated for one of the ion channelopathies called andersen tawil which has been much improved by adding potassium supplementation and potassium sparing diuretics,, this has been more helpfull to me than 15 years of antidepressants,,
    kattsqueen 29 Replies
    • September 19, 2010
    • 05:22 AM
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  • Based on my research into the matter most anti-depressants work by blocking the reabsorption of serotonin so the neurotransmitter continues to fire repreatedly providing more stimulation. However taking anti-depressants does not increase the production of serotonin and over time this process can actually lead to a decrease in serotonin. St. John's Wort is suppose to help with mood problems, but I believe it works in a way similar to anti-depressants and therefore has the same problem. For a little while I actually experimented with taking a dose of it 3 times a day for a few weeks to a month and it seems like my mood problems became worse. ........... I can't say I have heard anything about potassium being helpful in aiding mood problems, but vitamin D yes. The reason vitamin C is added into my regiment is it is suppose to be helpful for getting rid of excess cortisol. P_P27
    Pink_Panther27 20 Replies
    • September 20, 2010
    • 05:33 PM
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  • Based on my research into the matter most anti-depressants work by blocking the reabsorption of serotonin so the neurotransmitter continues to fire repreatedly providing more stimulation. However taking anti-depressants does not increase the production of serotonin and over time this process can actually lead to a decrease in serotonin. St. John's Wort is suppose to help with mood problems, but I believe it works in a way similar to anti-depressants and therefore has the same problem. For a little while I actually experimented with taking a dose of it 3 times a day for a few weeks to a month and it seems like my mood problems became worse. ........... I can't say I have heard anything about potassium being helpful in aiding mood problems, but vitamin D yes. The reason vitamin C is added into my regiment is it is suppose to be helpful for getting rid of excess cortisol. P_P27 potassium aids in depression only if you are low or in some people the low normal range.. this is not someone trying to sell vitamins,,,or minerals..some persons with these problems in the ion channels in there cells will experience this,,, nothing really dangerous in trying a jug of v8 juice preferably low salt,,, to see if your sensory overload problems or muscle problems improve or your mood improve,, heres a link you might find interesting on the science of what im sayinghttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=gene&part=hpp karen
    kattsqueen 29 Replies
    • September 20, 2010
    • 08:10 PM
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  • There can be a lot of reasons for the depression.Always to have balanced food can make our self prevent from the various diseases.Depression can be lack of proper vitamins which are essential to balance our state of mind though its not a big reason for the depression.
    Natural Medicine 24 Replies
    • September 23, 2010
    • 04:36 AM
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