Discussions By Condition: Medical Stories

unable to consistently form sentences, dizziness,fatigue,memory loss, respatory prob.

Posted In: Medical Stories 4 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • April 6, 2007
  • 09:52 PM

My wife has had these syptoms in the past 2 months: pneumonia, speech problems-not being able to say the words properly even though she knows what she meant to say, fatigue, dizziness, confusion, chronc knee pain-needs a cane. Wants sugar all the time.
She is veryintellgent and very frustrated. Poor insurance and hack doctors have come up with nithing more than phys.therapy and speech therapy. But what is he cause?!?!?

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  • What medications has she been on in the past 6 months?DOM
    acuann 3080 Replies Flag this Response
  • At this time, nothing but paxil, however becuase of her sciatic nerve pain which I failed to mention, she was taking hydrocodone, oxycodone, amitryptilyn, and flexirl. Often times she would overdose.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Is she still taking all those meds?? It could be from all of them as side affects?? Paxil for sciatica?? Do a search on Paxil some people have had a lot of problems with it. Craving sugars?? That could be one of theses, yeast, thyroid or Lyme disease. I suggest you have her get these things tested. And do some searches on the above too. Good Luck Eddy
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Interactions between your selected drugs http://www.drugs.com/images/s3.jpg amitriptyline and paroxetine (Major Drug-Drug)GENERALLY AVOID: Coadministration with paroxetine may significantly increase the plasma concentrations of some tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). The proposed mechanism is paroxetine inhibition of CYP450 2D6, the isoenzyme responsible for the metabolic clearance of many antidepressant and psychotropic drugs. Several-fold increases in plasma levels and decreases in metabolic clearance have been reported for desipramine and nortriptyline, while smaller changes have been reported for amitriptyline and imipramine, presumably because other CYP450 isoenzymes are also involved in their metabolism. Pharmacodynamically, the combination of paroxetine (or any other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and a TCA may potentiate the risk of serotonin syndrome, which is a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition thought to result from hyperstimulation of brainstem 5HT1A receptors. MANAGEMENT: In general, the use of paroxetine (or other SSRIs) with TCAs should be avoided if possible, or otherwise approached with caution if potential benefit is deemed to outweigh the risk. Pharmacologic response and plasma TCA levels should be monitored more closely whenever paroxetine is added to or withdrawn from therapy in patients stabilized on their existing antidepressant regimen, and the TCA dosage adjusted as necessary. Patients should be monitored closely for signs and symptoms of TCA toxicity (e.g., sedation, dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, urinary retention) and/or excessive serotonergic activity (e.g., CNS irritability, altered consciousness, confusion, myoclonus, ataxia, abdominal cramping, hyperpyrexia, shivering, pupillary dilation, diaphoresis, hypertension, and tachycardia). http://www.drugs.com/images/s2.jpg cyclobenzaprine and paroxetine (Moderate Drug-Drug)MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities. http://www.drugs.com/images/s2.jpg amitriptyline and oxycodone (Moderate Drug-Drug)MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities. http://www.drugs.com/images/s2.jpg amitriptyline and cyclobenzaprine (Moderate Drug-Drug)MONITOR: Agents with anticholinergic properties (e.g., sedating antihistamines; antispasmodics; neuroleptics; phenothiazines; skeletal muscle relaxants; tricyclic antidepressants; class IA antiarrhythmics especially disopyramide) may have additive effects when used in combination. Excessive parasympatholytic effects may result in paralytic ileus, hyperthermia, heat stroke, and the anticholinergic intoxication syndrome. Peripheral symptoms of intoxication commonly include mydriasis, blurred vision, flushed face, fever, dry skin and mucous membranes, tachycardia, urinary retention, and constipation. Central symptoms may include memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, hallucinations, psychosis, delirium, hyperactivity, twitching or jerking movements, stereotypy, and seizures. Central nervous system-depressant effects may also be additively or synergistically increased when these agents are combined, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. Use of neuroleptics in combination with other neuroleptics or anticholinergic agents may increase the risk of tardive dyskinesia. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised when agents with anticholinergic properties are combined, particularly in the elderly and those with underlying organic brain disease, who tend to be more sensitive to the central anticholinergic effects of these drugs and in whom toxicity symptoms may be easily overlooked. Patients should be advised to notify their physician promptly if they experience potential symptoms of anticholinergic intoxication such as abdominal pain, fever, heat intolerance, blurred vision, confusion, and/or hallucinations. Ambulatory patients should be counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. A reduction in anticholinergic dosages may be necessary if excessive adverse effects develop. http://www.drugs.com/images/s2.jpg amitriptyline and hydrocodone (Moderate Drug-Drug)MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities. http://www.drugs.com/images/s2.jpg oxycodone and paroxetine (Moderate Drug-Drug)MONITOR: A case report suggests that use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors with oxycodone may potentiate the risk of serotonin syndrome, which is a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition thought to result from hyperstimulation of brainstem 5-HT1A receptors. However, unlike other analgesics such as phenylpiperidine opioids (e.g., meperidine) and tramadol, oxycodone is not known to possess serotonergic activity and has not previously been associated with the serotonin syndrome. The report describes a bone marrow transplant patient who developed severe tremors and visual hallucinations after he dramatically increased his dosage of oxycodone while on a stable dosage of sertraline and cyclosporine. Discontinuation of cyclosporine did not completely resolve his hallucinations and had no effect on the tremors after 72 hours, which led to consideration of a possible sertraline-oxycodone interaction. The patient's symptoms resolved after sertraline was withheld and cyproheptadine (a central serotonin antagonist) administered. MANAGEMENT: Until further data are available, caution is advised if serotonin reuptake inhibitors is coadministered with oxycodone, particularly in complicated patients such as transplant patients who are also receiving cyclosporine. Close monitoring is recommended for signs and symptoms of excessive serotonergic activity such as CNS irritability, altered consciousness, confusion, myoclonus, ataxia, abdominal cramping, hyperpyrexia, shivering, pupillary dilation, diaphoresis, hypertension, and tachycardia. Particular caution is advised when increasing the dosages of these agents. http://www.drugs.com/images/s2.jpg hydrocodone and paroxetine (Moderate Drug-Drug)MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities. Sorry so long, but thought this was important. Had to edit it as this thread was too long. This is from www.drugs.com Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies Flag this Response
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