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teacher with possible autistic student

Posted In: Medical Stories 10 Replies
  • Posted By: magana
  • September 30, 2006
  • 03:31 PM

I have a kinder student who may be autistic. I've been researching autism but he doesn't seem to have the "symptoms". He doesn't do much in the class but lay down on the carpet. He doesn't have verbal skills. He may say a few words and I was told he didn't crawl until 2. Anyone have any similiar situations?

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  • Im not sure if this will help, but My cousin has Autism, and didnt crawl untill about 2. He often repeats words, over and over. You can anwer his question, but still he repeats. He didnt have his vocabulary untill 6 or 7. He could say words, but didnt put them into sentences. Now he does, but still repeats. As far as I know there are many levels of autism, so even though it sounds like autism, it might not be. ?? Im sorry I couldnt be of more help. Have the parents had him checked? Did the school do tests?
    JenniferAshley 4 Replies
    • September 30, 2006
    • 05:09 PM
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  • i have 2 17 year old high functioning autistic sons. there is a wide spectrum, but from your short description it does sound like autismn . a question does he flap hands or rock in chair or do any other self stimulating type activities? or just lay on the floor . still doesn't mean he doesn't have it. my kids were not verbal until 5 or 6 but other kids on the spectrum, sometimes never talk. agreat website to check out is www. futurehorizons.com
    miss horatio 3 Replies
    • October 1, 2006
    • 01:10 PM
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  • i have 2 17 year old high functioning autistic sons. there is a wide spectrum, but from your short description it does sound like autismn . a question does he flap hands or rock in chair or do any other self stimulating type activities? or just lay on the floor . still doesn't mean he doesn't have it. my kids were not verbal until 5 or 6 but other kids on the spectrum, sometimes never talk. agreat website to check out is www. futurehorizons.com hope this helps a little
    miss horatio 3 Replies
    • October 1, 2006
    • 01:11 PM
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  • My son as some of the same symptoms. He was premature, didnt crawl until he was over one year old and didnt walk until he was almost two. He also doesn't do much in class, and he doesn't talk much. Alot of the time, when he is asked a question, he only can repeat the question. He doesn't make much eye contact and he has anger issues and we have been trying to help him with control his aggression. I am not sure about your state, but my son as been referred to DDSN (for children with disabilities or special needs.) They will send someone out to his home and they will do an assessment. You may also want to consider Asbergers syndrome which has similiar symptoms as autism, but it's symptoms aren't as severe as autism. The parents will want to talk to his doc. It will help to send your concerns to his doc as my son's teacher did as well. Also have you considered ADHD? I have to do so much research for my son and maybe this child has some of those symptoms. I hope I have been alittle helpful. Good Luck!
    b_rwhite5 1 Replies
    • October 1, 2006
    • 06:06 PM
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  • how does the child act when you remove him from the floor?what do parents say?are you accepting his behavior?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 8, 2006
    • 09:47 PM
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  • This parents think it's behavior. I ask him to sit up and he does. I don't mind having him in my class as long as I have support. I've had other inclusion students in my class and for the most part, I think it is good for the other students.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 10, 2006
    • 07:39 PM
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  • Thank you all for your insight and help. I am going to speak with the inclusion teacher that visits him weekly. Once again, THANK YOU ALL!!!!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 10, 2006
    • 07:44 PM
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  • I have found a 99.4% Correlation Between white spots in the fingernails and low academic standing.I have examined the fingernails of about five-hundred school children in the category of "slow learners, emotionally handicapped, mentally retarded, resource room students, and remedial reading students." This occurred during the course of over 500 trips to schools (spent mostly with the above type students). All but three of the students had white flecks in their fingernail. (This is a 99.4 percent correlation between white spots and low academic standing.) This is a condition called: leukonychia (canities unguium) This indicates a serious zinc deficiency. (You can be deficient without the white flecks.)Two of the many clinical consequences of zinc deficiency is "behavioral disturbances," and "depresses mental function." There are over 300 more consequences of this deficiency.You cannot eat "right" and obtain enough zinc. Breakfast cereals (even w/ zinc added) are a zinc negative. Phytates in grains bind with zinc and carry it out of the body. I've been looking at this problem for over 25 years. Have over 100 terrifying pages. For more info contact davidgunderhill@lv.rmci.net. Response from a mother with ADHD(?) son:Quote: OK, I have had my son on zinc, calcium and magnesium supplements since reading about it here on this site. The results are amazing. He not only suffered from a lot of food allergies but attention and focusing problems. The white flecks in his nails are gone, his bedwetting stopped, his behavioral problems at daycare/school are minimum to none. He is working very ******n his school-work and his emotional feelings seem to be much more stable. We are very happy with the results so far and I am so glad I found this group! Unquote
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • He needs a comprehensive psychological evaluation from the school psychologist, speech therapist and occupational therapist. He should have been evaluated via Child Find before kindergarten and you should have referred him before the end of the school year to your child study team. His doctor needs to do the autistic diagnosis, so mom needs to take him to a developmental pediatrician for a diagnosis.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have a kinder student who may be autistic. I've been researching autism but he doesn't seem to have the "symptoms". He doesn't do much in the class but lay down on the carpet. He doesn't have verbal skills. He may say a few words and I was told he didn't crawl until 2. Anyone have any similiar situations?It is quite possible that your student has Benign Congenital Hypotonia AKA low muscle tone from birth with unknown cause. These kids do not reach their physical mile stones until much later. Their ability to reach mile stones improves with intense physical therapy. However, a child with no intervention would have more of an uphill battle. As you know, a child's cognitive growth in the early years is very much tied to their physical ability at different stages. Their ability to grown cognitively at the stationary, rolling, crawling, toddling, walking stages is greatly tied to their ability to do those physical things. So, it would not be an impossibility for a child that has severe delays physically (especially with no intervention) to be behind cognitively. You mentioned he lays in the floor. Children with Benign Congenital Hypotonia have very weak core strength...this in turn leads to weak gross motor skills and then filters down to weak fine motor skills. Putting this type of child on the floor in a "criss cross apple sauce" position is the worst thing. A child with low tone is working 100 times harder to be in that position than a child with normal tone. It is VERY uncomfortable for that child not to mention tiring. They need to be in a chair with support.Sometimes poor vision can accompany a child with low tone. It is imperative that you urge the parents to have the child's vision screened by an Opthamologist. They can determine vision issues without input from the child via a Snellen Chart. Hope this helps.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
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