Discussions By Condition: Medical Stories

Rheumatoid arthritis and parvo virus

Posted In: Medical Stories 13 Replies
  • Posted By: snowboundlady
  • July 12, 2007
  • 01:40 AM

I am writing about my daughter, age 48, whose suffering is more than she can bear and I can no longer bear to watch her suffer. She was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis about a year ago and diagnosed with human parvo virus several months ago. When the doctor saw the results of her test for parvo he said, "Wow!". The only treatment she has had for either is NSAID's, which do nothing, and numerous prescriptions for Percoset. The only time she has had any relief at all from symptoms of either was from a short-term titrated dose of prednisone. While she was on the prednisone she said it was the first time she had felt normal in three years. She does not want the Percoset - it does not take away the pain and only makes her sleep, to say nothing of the fact that it is an addicting narcotic. She has recently developed a red, itchy and painful rash on the dorsal aspect of her hands and arms. Heat and sun immediately worsen the rash. The anterior aspects of her hands and arms appear completely normal with a sharp line of demarkation along the sides of her hands and arms where the rash abruptly stops. She says the rash is quite painful and feels as though her skin is thickening. The skin is beginning to split at her wrists. She recently saw a physician who said it was carpal tunnel (yeah, right!) and then said it was from washing dishes! All he did was prescribe more Percoset. Her doctor refuses to put her on a low maintenance dose of prednisone - which gave her the only brief spate of relief she has had in three years. What can she do? What can I do to help her? She hates her "quality of life". She has two children and is in so much pain that she is almost unable to care for them or for herself. HELP! p.s...I am a retired nurse.

Reply Flag this Discussion

13 Replies:

  • My mom went through the same thing (almost). She was diagnosed with Parvo Virus & poly myalgia rhuematica (sp?). She was on prednisone for almost 2 years. She had the rash on her palms etc. She is ok now, however she went through ***l. I've never heard of parvo & now I'm seeing it more and more.I'm sorry, I wish I could help. I will pray for your daughter :(
    sosickofthis 31 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thank you. Prayers always help. She is on her way to the doctor right now and if he doesn't give her some help I've told her it's time to get another doctor. She can hardly walk with the pain from the rheumatoid arthritis. Parvo is a virus commonly known to affect dogs. However, there is a human parvo, also known as Fifth Disease, which is not nearly as serious (the dog version has a 95% fatality rate). Thank you again.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Being in the alt health field for over 20 years, I feel that RA is late stage Lyme. Access www.lymenet.org Regular MDs know zero about this, really. I am being blunt because it is a very very serious disease.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Lyme is one consideration. Closely related to information found regarding mycoplasma related diseases.Please go to the "I cannot get a diagnosis" forum...Please read "Want Answers, read here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! There are other threads there realted to mycoplasma.Eatafruit78 has written a few also. Best to you and your daughter...I wish you both well...mommy cat
    mommy cat 1654 Replies Flag this Response
  • I was diagnosed with Parvo virus over a year ago. My test for Rheumatoid arthritis was negative. However, I had suffered arthritic problems in my hands and feet due to the parvo. Over a year later, I still am having problems with my hands and feet. it is not constant, but when it flares up, I am in quite a great deal of discomfort. Daypro helps the pain. Does anyone know how long you experience arthritis from Parvo?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 16, 2008
    • 01:20 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Hello,I've been experiencing many of the same symptoms for the last six months. Symmetrical arthritis, mainly in feet and hands, though I feel shots of pain elsewhere and have had a couple of weeks (a few times) each with a sore mouth. I've been extremely fatigued too with a feeling of muscle atrophy/weakness, and parathesia. It's really hard to explain to people as I look fine. My Neuroligist said it was parvo and my IGG was 6.2, and I was anemic on two blood tests, and most recently have had miscorscopic hematuria on the last four urine samples. The urologist said my kidney's were bleeding slightly, but he didn't need to do anymore tests. Six months later, I have an apt. with a rheumatologist, so we'll see what she says. I guess I'm just frustrated because the doctors tell me just to wait and it will go away...It's very difficult. I can;' even imagine people that have been suffering for years..
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 11, 2009
    • 01:04 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I was diagnosed with Parvo virus over a year ago. My test for Rheumatoid arthritis was negative. However, I had suffered arthritic problems in my hands and feet due to the parvo. Over a year later, I still am having problems with my hands and feet. it is not constant, but when it flares up, I am in quite a great deal of discomfort. Daypro helps the pain. Does anyone know how long you experience arthritis from Parvo?I contracted a parvo infection in my freshman year of college (97-98). I did not exhibit the obvious symptoms, but felt minor joint pain, which was clearly abnormal. I am an extremely healthy person by most measures. In my entire 30 years, I've only had a few sinus infections, and don't remember the last time I had the flu. Anyway, I tested positive for the antibodies and then, after consulting with several rheumatologists, was told that all symptoms should disappear with a year.Now, after 11 years, I am really starting to suffer. My pain has increased incrementally over the years - in a straight line upward. I have persistent pain that worsens with movement - but without the typical level of swelling associated with arthritis. All the regular arthro tests say "no" to rheumatoid, even the x-rays. My rheumatologist is one of the best in Dallas and he is confounded. I really don't think about it most of the time, but days like today (I hurt so much that I really shouldn't even pretend to work at the office) remind me of what we are all going through. WARNING: Do not let your physician put "possible rheumatoid arhritis" (unless there is reason to suspect it) in your medical chart. If you ever lose your group health insurance, you may find it impossible to obtain private coverage. Despite relying on Ibuprofen from Costco for pain relief during grad school, I was referred to the high-risk pool at the State of Texas with a $500/month premium. Peace and love to all of you. Be strong.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I am writing about my daughter, age 48, whose suffering is more than she can bear and I can no longer bear to watch her suffer. She was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis about a year ago and diagnosed with human parvo virus several months ago. When the doctor saw the results of her test for parvo he said, "Wow!". The only treatment she has had for either is NSAID's, which do nothing, and numerous prescriptions for Percoset. The only time she has had any relief at all from symptoms of either was from a short-term titrated dose of prednisone. While she was on the prednisone she said it was the first time she had felt normal in three years. She does not want the Percoset - it does not take away the pain and only makes her sleep, to say nothing of the fact that it is an addicting narcotic. She has recently developed a red, itchy and painful rash on the dorsal aspect of her hands and arms. Heat and sun immediately worsen the rash. The anterior aspects of her hands and arms appear completely normal with a sharp line of demarkation along the sides of her hands and arms where the rash abruptly stops. She says the rash is quite painful and feels as though her skin is thickening. The skin is beginning to split at her wrists. She recently saw a physician who said it was carpal tunnel (yeah, right!) and then said it was from washing dishes! All he did was prescribe more Percoset. Her doctor refuses to put her on a low maintenance dose of prednisone - which gave her the only brief spate of relief she has had in three years. What can she do? What can I do to help her? She hates her "quality of life". She has two children and is in so much pain that she is almost unable to care for them or for herself. HELP! p.s...I am a retired nurse.A couple things you may want to look in to. One, with co-"infections" like this it may be very possible that she has lyme disease; as that is charecteristic of lyme; and lyme can be hard to test for and is easily misdiagnosed. Now, even if it isn't lyme, she may be interested in an anti-biotic protocol rather than steroid treatment. A lot of studies have been done to show that one of the most probable causes of auto-immune disorders (which RA is one of), is in fact common germs; mixed with a genetic suceptability to these germs; so rather than keeping these germs in check they grow to massive numbers and hide within the connective tissue of the body; where your immune system will attempt to remove them, causing the inflammation and the pain. The reason this treatment is so significant is that it removes the source rather than treating the symptoms by suppressing your immune system, as steroids do. This treatment is not easy though, but it has worked wonders for me and many others. I have had MCTD (an autoimmune disorder) for 6 years now; and my bloodwork has improved 10 fold (RA factor down from 614 to 62), since my first diagnosis. But when treating an infection you can have a reaction (known as a herxheimer reaction), that causess flu like symptoms from the released toxins in the germs which are killed off. So treatment is a carefull balancing act of useing enough medicine to effect the germs but not so much that you become overly tired and sore; these amounts can vary from person to person. But I ramble, if you really would like to look in to this treatment you should consider looking in to the book "The New Arthritis Breakthrough" by Henry Scammel; or take a glance at this support website http://www.roadback.org/. But I do hope she is doing better and all is well.Best of Wishes,A Friend
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 17, 2009
    • 06:01 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • My daughter was diagnosed 12/08 with parvo b19, arhtirits and GBS. She was recently tested for persistent parvo b19 and tested positive 3/10. The only possible cure for persistent parvo b19 arthritis is ivig. Parvo b19 induced arthritis and RA are not the same. Researchers have done many studies on this and there is no link. Please google ivig and parvo b19 and also parvo b19 and RA to read this info. If you have arthritis as a result of parvo b19 please do not suffer. Try to talk your doctor into ivig. I pray that it will help people. My daughter has gotten ivig but we are going to try it again as she is only 3. Please pray for her.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have rheumatoid arthritis that got started after Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. My primary doc tried NSAIDs and they didn't work for me. He gave me a brief round of prednisone and it worked. Then, he sent me to a specialist.Now, I see a rheumatologist and he is keeping me on a low dose of prednisone along with methotrexate. It's not working 100% but I can function most of the time. I highly recommend a rheumatologist if your daughter doesn't have one. They wont dish out percoset. Mine didn't, anyway. He has done xrays on my joints, drained my knees, an extensive health history, checks my joints, etc. on a bimonthly basis unless I need to see him sooner. Don't suffer with RA. Find a good specialist!
    JoeWNC 7 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thank you. Prayers always help. She is on her way to the doctor right now and if he doesn't give her some help I've told her it's time to get another doctor. She can hardly walk with the pain from the rheumatoid arthritis. Parvo is a virus commonly known to affect dogs. However, there is a human parvo, also known as Fifth Disease, which is not nearly as serious (the dog version has a 95% fatality rate). Thank you again.I would like to tell you that human parvo is very serious and very contagious. I contracted it last summer. I thought I had lyme's disease and was being treated for that until my husband came down with the exact same symptoms. The pain was horrible! I could barely walk and cringed at the idea of having to use the bathroom ( the getting up and walking part I mean). After almost 8 weeks of debilitating pain, fatigue, etc. it finally started to subside with medication (antibiotics). While my husband and recovered from parvo, I am now suffering greatly from Rheumatoid Arthritis. I sincerely believe that the parvo led to the RA. My husband doesn't not suffer from RA. Typically it affects women more than men. He is also 9 years older than I. I believe that years ago doctors underestimated the human parvo but since then they now consider it to be very serious.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 28, 2010
    • 05:26 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Complications of Crohn’s Disease

    Recognize the risks associated with Crohn’s disease.

    8 Surprising Facts About Cholesterol

    Did you know that one in six US adults has high cholesterol?

  • The exact same thing happened to me - my son came home with Fifth disease (blotchy rash all over his arms and legs). I had the infection several days later (mild fever), then the arthritis pain came. It was so bad I could hardly walk. I went to my doctor, and got a blood test that showed very, very high liver enzymes. Further tests were positive for IgM to Parvo B19, then later IgG to Parvo B19. My liver enzymes came closer to normal, but remained a bit higher than normal. The arthritis was terribly, terribly painful, with flares making it unbearable. Since the liver enzymes were still high, I was told to get a liver biopsy, and they diagnosed it as autoimmune hepatitis. The arthritis has become clinically defined rheumatoid arthritis. None of my doctors believe that it has anything to do with Parvo B19, but it happened at the exact same time, it is just too much for coincidence in my opinion. I was put on prednisone for the autoimmune hepatitis and the liver enzymes came back to normal. Since prednisone has a lot of bad side effects (like gaining 50 pounds!), I was switched to imuran. Now I also take enbrel for the RA (it helps a lot, I highly recommend it). I've done a lot of reading, and although the medical dogma is that there is no connection between Parvo B19 and autoimmune disease, the science does show a lot of autoimmune symptoms with the illness and there are many, many case reports of persistent arthritis lasting for years (it has been 3 years for me now). It has also been shown that the infection can persist, and the only treatment is with IgG to Parvo B19. I haven't tried that yet. It has been shown that Parvo B19 DNA can persist in the body for many decades as well, although in most people it doesn't cause a problem. So what I have, and possibly also your daughter, could be from persistent virus, either replicating or being active within cells. Alternatively, the virus could have triggered the autoimmune conditions in us and is no longer active, and the autoimmune disease can keep itself going. I find it intriguing that the virus actually transactivates the gene for TNF-alpha, the exact same cytokine that enbrel blocks.The cause and mechanism of autoimmune disease is still being heavily researched and the connection to viral infections, though certainly scientifically plausible, is considered "controversial" but since it happened to me I am convinced. I have a research lab and am studying the connections now (if funding is awarded, it is hard since like I said there is a lot of skeptics since the epidemiology data don't support a link). My advice is to have your daughter see a rheumatologist. Parvo B19 that persists looks so much like rheumatoid arthritis that they may diagnose it as that, and at least the medications to treat RA appear to work with Parvo B19 arthritis (it has in my case).
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I would like to tell you that human parvo is very serious and very contagious. I contracted it last summer. I thought I had lyme's disease and was being treated for that until my husband came down with the exact same symptoms. The pain was horrible! I could barely walk and cringed at the idea of having to use the bathroom ( the getting up and walking part I mean). After almost 8 weeks of debilitating pain, fatigue, etc. it finally started to subside with medication (antibiotics). While my husband and recovered from parvo, I am now suffering greatly from Rheumatoid Arthritis. I sincerely believe that the parvo led to the RA. My husband doesn't not suffer from RA. Typically it affects women more than men. He is also 9 years older than I. I believe that years ago doctors underestimated the human parvo but since then they now consider it to be very serious.I totally agree - they tell me it is mere coincidence that I got RA exactly when I got Parvo B19. I have found that doctors only look at the epidemiology studies, and those don't show a link, but absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. I think larger studies need to be done. There is definitely a genetic predisposition that may be very rare, but there are a lot of people who have progressed from Parvo B19 to RA. Maybe it is a persistent infection, or maybe not, but this has happened to many people!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.