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My 4 yr old son cries himself into a seizure, any insite?

Posted In: Medical Stories 1 Replies
  • Posted By: Olvera2009
  • March 30, 2009
  • 08:39 PM

He was born with a double knot in his umbilical cord the Dr.'s took pictures and told me how uncommon this was, and were amazed he was born alive. I obviously was thankful to God for my son's miraculous entry into our world. He was almost 1 when he had his first crying induced seizure; blacking out, turning blue, completely stiff and eyes rolled back in his head, I was worried so I took him to the his Dr. and showed him that even me leaving the room would cause him to be so upset that he would seize, he told me that since the seizures are self induced that it wasn’t anything to be worried about, and he would grow out of it eventually. Well over the years the frequency has died down but he still has them and recently it seems they may be picking back up. I know that my husband’s family has some epilepsy history but the doctor says that doesn't mean anything. There is a little more history to this, my 2 daughters born before my son had several small seizures and while they were only 3-6 months old, nothing too severe just some eye rolling and slight stiffening. The second daughter had an MRI done with no findings. All of this happened with the same Dr. and I am timid to bring up the increase of seizures thinking he may just dismiss it altogether.

I am looking to find out if anyone else has experienced these types of seizures or heard of them.

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  • He was born with a double knot in his umbilical cord the Dr.'s took pictures and told me how uncommon this was, and were amazed he was born alive. I obviously was thankful to God for my son's miraculous entry into our world. He was almost 1 when he had his first crying induced seizure; blacking out, turning blue, completely stiff and eyes rolled back in his head, I was worried so I took him to the his Dr. and showed him that even me leaving the room would cause him to be so upset that he would seize, he told me that since the seizures are self induced that it wasn’t anything to be worried about, and he would grow out of it eventually. Well over the years the frequency has died down but he still has them and recently it seems they may be picking back up. I know that my husband’s family has some epilepsy history but the doctor says that doesn't mean anything. There is a little more history to this, my 2 daughters born before my son had several small seizures and while they were only 3-6 months old, nothing too severe just some eye rolling and slight stiffening. The second daughter had an MRI done with no findings. All of this happened with the same Dr. and I am timid to bring up the increase of seizures thinking he may just dismiss it altogether. I am looking to find out if anyone else has experienced these types of seizures or heard of them.Hi Olvera2009,Seeing your son experience seizure activity must be very upsetting.There MAY be some aspect of a behavioral component in your son's seizures BUT you have detailed some rather concerning information.It is of CONSIDERABLE importance to know whether the double knots present in your son's umbilical cord at birth were classified as LOOSE or TIGHT. If you are uncertain perhaps you could inquire of the Doctor present at his birth. It is possible but NOT definite that your son experienced some degree of cerebral ischemia (restriction of blood flow to the brain) in-utero, and also during the birth process. The risk of this occurring is much higher with tight cord knots.Fetal/infant cerebral ischemia, depending on the degree, is a very common cause of seizure disorder. If the Doctor who has seemingly made light of your concerns (and has not initiated further evaluation) is the children's Pediatrician, shame on him. Considering your family history of epilepsy and the seizures your daughters have experienced, I would VERY STRONGLY encourage you to shake off any timidity and seek out a Pediatric Neurologist to evaluate your son, if not ALL your children. Brain MRI (and CT scan) is often of only limited value in terms of diagnosing a seizure disorder. Your detailed reports of your daily observations, along with a neurological evaluation by a Pediatric Neurologist, which would usually include a test that measures the electrical activity in the brain called an electroencephalogram (EEG), would be the proper path toward arriving at a diagnosis.Keep us apprised of your progress.Regards,John
    JonMac 165 Replies Flag this Response
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