Discussions By Condition: Medical Stories

Movement, malnutrition, liver disease, death

Posted In: Medical Stories 0 Replies
  • Posted By: Anne Bruhner
  • February 9, 2010
  • 10:20 PM

:rolleyes:My daughter died two years ago after a broken leg put her in the hospital for about two and a half months for long term care. She was diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver, was on the liver transplant list until pulmonary hypertension was discovered and a transplant was denied. She lived five years after that time. During her hospital stay, there were many errors in judgement and lack of diagnosis of recurring problems and she finally died unable to move, eat, sit up or talk and, after being given a one dose penicillan IV, she died. I have documented these things, talked with the hospital administration and they have remedied some of these indemic problems. At the time of her death, a liver specialist who had recently reviewed her lab reports over nine year's time with me, told me that the progression of her liver disease was extremely slow, and, finally, that she did not die of liver disease.
I continue to wonder if my daughter's original diagnosis was correct and, in the process of researching a Vitamin supplement have discovered that many of her symptoms seem to lead back to malnutrition in some way or another.
She had a stillborn daughter and a six month birth of a son who died after she suffered preeclampsia. Previous to those problems she had noticibly severe problems with balance and socially understanding body language and nuances of normal language. After the birth of her two children and a subsequent divorce, she was seen by two doctors and was said to suffer from malnutrition: one doctor believed she was dieting too much; the other said, "What can I do about that?" After about a year after an automobile accident she suffered from recurring cellulitis and was then diagnosed with liver disease. Over a period of nine years the drugs that she was prescribed were minimal, but perhaps dangerous: Furosemide, Spirolactone, Neomycin and Lactulose.
These drugs eventually kept her at home near the bathroom and did not greatly reduce her edema, but did contribute to her weight gains, problems with balance and the disintegration of her teeth.
I am, too late, beginning to believe that she originally had a problem with absorption of nutrients from her food and daily vitamins that was exacerbated during pregnancy, and, that if that problem had been addressed she might have improved her life and been able to function much more normally than she did. I see that Furosemide is often listed as a culprit in preventing absorption of specific vitamins and assume that lactulose did the same. I would also assume that prolonged use of the two antibiotics she was prescribed would have interferred with her intestinal beneficial flora and fauna.
I tried to help my daughter live, but feel that I did not have the proper information and that she was, maybe, misdiagnosed each time that she came in contact with a different set of medical problems. Although it cannot help her now, I would like to further research these ideas so that I can learn about what happened and perhaps write about it so that someone else may benefit.
Thank you if you can point me in a direction to accomplish my goal.

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