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mouth blood blisters

Posted In: Medical Stories 39 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • May 16, 2007
  • 02:05 AM

I get blood blisters in my mouth quite frequently (about 5 times per week) when I eat something too sweet or sour or salty or even dry. They pop up in a second and are filled with a lot of blood, on the top or sides of my tongue, inside my cheeks or the roof of my mouth. I have to pop them with a needle and let the blood go out or they can get very large, and then that skin stays sore for a couple of days. What are they caused from? Some defficiency?

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39 Replies:

  • My dad has this exact same problem and has been to several doctors and his dentist with no answers. Have you had any progress on this problem?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 10, 2007
    • 03:17 PM
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  • The answer is MSG in much of our food supply. It is masked by a dozen different names, too. It's even in toothpaste. Try organic.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • October 11, 2007
    • 05:48 AM
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  • I have *identical* symptoms - but I only suffer with it a couple of times a year. I haven't been able to identify the cause, it just happens when I eat certain food products. The blisters 'spring up' spontaneously, they seem to form in a matter of seconds, and - look away if you're squeemish - often burst; actually that's usually my first indication that they're there, the tell-tale iron taste of blood in my mouth.There's no pain or discomfort, I can feel them with my tongue and when they're there I'm more likely to accidentally bite the inside of my cheek because of the swelling. They don't seem to last very long, maybe a day or two, before disappearing. I'm glad it's not just me...
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 17, 2007
    • 01:32 AM
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  • I usually get them if I eat something hard (like pretzels), something too salty, or even sometimes with tomato sauce. I try to stay away from those things, but ever now and then, I have to have them! But then I pay the price.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • l have found that my blood blisters are caused by anything that has acid in it crisps apples vinegar tomatoes and hard sugary sweets ie do not eat lemon dropshope this helps
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 4, 2008
    • 05:14 PM
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  • I just ate six little dove silky smoothe milk chocolate hearts with a glass of milk and i noticed the blood blister on the inside of my cheek. I've never had that in the 25 years of my life inside my mouth. I had just swallowed the last bite of chocolate when i noticed something wierd in my cheek. I looked in the mirror and there it was. Well i hope it aint serious and that it goes away like it has for all of you guys.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 17, 2009
    • 08:21 PM
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  • UPDATE anyone???
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I get the pin head sized blood blisters from chocolate mostly, there can be one or more.. but eventually go to one, but thankful they aways seem to go away overnight, with a yukky taste in the morning or when it busts. Chocolate wasn't the only thing, there was fudge, musk sticks, choco coated ice-cream and even a bit of garlic bread. I just don't eat that for a bit and it ok again. So it must have something to do with a rush of something I just ate and the body maybe didn't need it! Everyone looks at me strangely when I say 'I just got a blood blister from that bit' so I'm really glad I'm reading about other people having the exact same problem.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Really mouth blood blisters is big disease of mouth.When You eat something a hard, salty,and soft fruits or even dry.Some blood spot stick with eatable nutrients.So You ought to consult a good doctor for diagnosis.
    crowewhite123 3 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have had this issue for the last year or so, at least once a week. It just happened again which prompted a search and led me here. I am confounded as to why this is suddenly happening when I have never had a blood blister in my mouth prior. I usually get them on the side of my tongue and sometimes on the cheeks, but I KNOW it is always because I bit the area. I just can't figure out WHY I keep doing it. My teeth are in excellent shape, no changes. I will be bringing this up with my dentist on my next visit. I don't think I am eating too fast and not paying attention, so why?? I will post again if I find out anything from the dentist.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 20, 2009
    • 08:50 PM
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  • I have had this issue for the last year or so, at least once a week. It just happened again which prompted a search and led me here. I am confounded as to why this is suddenly happening when I have never had a blood blister in my mouth prior. I usually get them on the side of my tongue and sometimes on the cheeks, but I KNOW it is always because I bit the area. I just can't figure out WHY I keep doing it. My teeth are in excellent shape, no changes. I will be bringing this up with my dentist on my next visit. I don't think I am eating too fast and not paying attention, so why?? I will post again if I find out anything from the dentist.I had gotten a very large one on the roof of my mouth back towards my throat, that I believe, was caused by taking Actonel.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 2, 2009
    • 06:23 PM
    • 0
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  • I get blood blisters in my mouth quite frequently (about 5 times per week) when I eat something too sweet or sour or salty or even dry. They pop up in a second and are filled with a lot of blood, on the top or sides of my tongue, inside my cheeks or the roof of my mouth. I have to pop them with a needle and let the blood go out or they can get very large, and then that skin stays sore for a couple of days. What are they caused from? Some defficiency? I am a Newby here, "Makarios", I have read your complaint,I really pity you, that must be a very painful and desperate situation.As I've just cured myself from a 2-days' spell of "Stomatitis aphthosa", I'll give the hints directly.But as they don't work on all patients alike, the individual 'normality' must be established first. As everybody thinks of himself as "normal' -I'd like to know a little bit more, may I put some questions to you ? 1.) What is Your dental Care-Status ? A: No fillings, splendid teeth, no denture, No cavities, daily 2x toothbrushB: some (1-3) cured cavities, no root-canal-fillings. Alu-foil-biting Test *) does not give any sensation.C: several 'cured' cavities,only non-metallic fillings 2 Liter ?2.'Mineral-Water' pH 4-53.Sprite,Squash, Fruit-Juice pH 2-34.Coky-Popsy or similar drinks of pH 1-2 Now my own experience with "Stomatitis aphtosa" (which -I know for sure- did not pop up after kissing new or wrong lips or dogs, horses etc.) which I just had for 2 days myself and cured myself (as I used to do with myself, my kids et al.)with Powdered Ascorbic Acid (=Vit.C.Pulvis)By -initially somewhat painful,then soothing- applicat.of crystalline Vit.C: I wetted a Q-Tip, dipped it into Vit.C-Powder and touched in front of a mirror the wound at the side of the tongue. Could eat with less pain my breakfast, which was ok (after the difficulties I had at eating last night!).At Lunchtime the pain was returning but not as severe.I wanted no pain, and not again the Vit.C.Now I used 1 tablespoon of virgin Coco-nut-oil, kept it moving with my tongue in my mouth without talking and swallowing for 10 minutes.Then I had a painfree lunch meal. After Repetition before my Supper-meal I feel cured now. I had missed for about 1 week my usual daily 1 tabl.of FolicAcid 400mcg in combinat.with 15 mcg B12 + 5 mg B6, (my supply was gone before the end of the month missing 1 week now) and it had run out of stock in the local Pharmacy. Folic Acid is essential supplement (Coferment) for the FAD in Macrophages' De-Aminases, which are essential to detoxify the health-disturbing D-AAs =d-Amino-Acids (as products of most Bacteria and increased in all fermented Protein (which is normally and before fermentative "Ripening") 100.0 % L-Amino-Acids in healthy fresh Protein). Some specially "tasty" Long-life-Shelf-Products have up to 15% D-AAs, which certainly are no good for YOPIs (Young, Old, Pregnant and Immune- disturbed Consumers). As Casey put it recently, we need Healthy Food as much as Health-Care. There may be some more points along that line. I'll come back to your problem on your reply. Cheer-up !yours truely Makarios
    Makarios 1 Replies
    • September 5, 2009
    • 07:17 PM
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  • Hi ....I suffer now and then, from tongue blood blisters....Thank you for this forum....I know now...they can be caused by acidic things...such tomato paste..For dinner we had home-made pizza with a jar of tomato Paste sauce as the base, and a blood blister the size of an peanut M & M...appeared within seconds on my tongue...(I'm glad I'm not the only one!)I recommend letting them 'pop' by themselves...and once they do...just apply a dry face towel on the burst blister...and the bleeding stops within seconds!!!!!Don't peel away the burst blister...let it heal by itself....Saliva is the best natural healer!!!Stay away from acidic or foods for about a day or so...until the 'stinging' sensation on the tongue disappears...(the tongue is healed)Thanks for sharing your info! :)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 15, 2010
    • 07:48 AM
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  • OMGosh....the same thing happend to me after eating a DOVE chocalate too ! What is in that stuff ?? I just ate six little dove silky smoothe milk chocolate hearts with a glass of milk and i noticed the blood blister on the inside of my cheek. I've never had that in the 25 years of my life inside my mouth. I had just swallowed the last bite of chocolate when i noticed something wierd in my cheek. I looked in the mirror and there it was. Well i hope it aint serious and that it goes away like it has for all of you guys.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 2, 2010
    • 06:39 PM
    • 0
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  • I have had them(blood blisters) on my tounge mainly for a couple of years, used to be more frequent. They seem to appear with rich food. They appear spontaniously, one happened today, huge, on the back bottom and side of my tounge. They sometimes used to turn into canker sores that were incredably painful. My dad is a dentist and his only solution was this block to stop or lessen the cankers after the blood blisters popped or i popped them with a needle as said above. My doctor had no idea either. I do eat organic mostly by the way and no msg at all! Also no meat except fish.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Raspberries. For me, no doubt about it. Months and months go by, no blisters (which I never get anyway). Raspberries for desert, bingo there they are. No soreness or anything, and they disappear within a day or two.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Angina bullosa hemorrhagica (ABH) is the term used to describe acute, benign, and generally subepithelial oral mucosal blisters filled with blood that are not attributable to a systemic disorder or hemostatic defect.This condition was first described in 1933 as traumatic oral hemophlyctenosis. Badham first used the currently accepted term angina bullosa hemorrhagica in 1967.The lesions may be confused with other more serious disorders (eg, mucous membrane pemphigoid, epidermolysis bullosa, linear IgA, dermatitis herpetiformis); however, the isolated nature, rapid healing, and rare recurrence of angina bullosa hemorrhagica blisters generally are sufficient findings to rule out the previously mentioned conditions.The lesions of angina bullosa hemorrhagica may be indistinguishable from blood blisters related to thrombocytopenia; however, blood tests and the absence of areas of ecchymosis, epistaxis, or gingival bleeding are helpful signs to rule it out.Some authors suggest mild trauma as the causative agent in angina bullosa hemorrhagica to break the epithelial–connective-tissue junction, causing bleeding of superficial capillaries and resulting in the formation of a subepithelial hemorrhagic bullae.Also see the eMedicine articles Bullous Pemphigoid, Epidermolysis Bullosa, Linear IgA Dermatosis, and Dermatitis Herpetiformis.Mortality/MorbidityAngina bullosa hemorrhagica is a benign condition; however, some authors have reported acute upper airway obstruction associated with rapidly enlarging bulla of the posterior pharynx and epiglottic region.1 Rarely, tracheal intubation and surgical tracheostomy are required in angina bullosa hemorrhagica patients.SexNo sex predilection is reported for angina bullosa hemorrhagica.AgeAngina bullosa hemorrhagica predominantly affects middle-aged or elderly people. The median age at angina bullosa hemorrhagica presentation is 54 years, with 60% of the patients in the range of 45-70 years. Lesions have not been documented in children younger than 10 years.ClinicalHistoryThe blisters of angina bullosa hemorrhagica predominantly affect middle-aged or elderly people without sex predilection.Some patients with angina bullosa hemorrhagica describe a stinging pain or burning sensation immediately before the appearance of the blood blister.The blisters last only few minutes and then spontaneously rupture, leaving a shallow ulcer that heals without scarring, discomfort, or pain. Note the images below.A 42-year-old man with the sudden appearance of angina bullosa hemorrhagica. The patient experienced pain a few minutes before the bulla appeared. He had a history of 3 similar previous episodes at the same site. Because the lesions only stay intact for a short duration, the patient took the picture using his own cellular phone.A 42-year-old man with the sudden appearance of angina bullosa hemorrhagica. The patient experienced pain a few minutes before the bulla appeared. He had a history of 3 similar previous episodes at the same site. Because the lesions only stay intact for a short duration, the patient took the picture using his own cellular phone. Image shows 24 hours after the initial presentation of angina bullosa hemorrhagica.Patients do not report a tendency to bleed at other sites.Family history generally is noncontributory to angina bullosa hemorrhagica. Grinspan et al2 reported that 44% of his patients in a series of 24 cases published in 1999 suffered from type II diabetes, hyperglycemia, or family history of diabetes. No conclusive evidence of a cause-and-effect relationship between the presence of angina bullosa hemorrhagica and glucose metabolism exists.PhysicalThe lesions of angina bullosa hemorrhagica reach an average size of 1-3 cm in diameter.The soft palate is the most commonly affected site in angina bullosa hemorrhagica.3Occasional lesions have been reported in the buccal mucosa and tongue.The anterior third is most commonly affected in the tongue.Approximately one third of the patients exhibit lesions in more than one location.The oral mucosa attached to bone (ie, masticatory mucosa represented by the hard palate and gingiva) is not affected.Similar lesions in other mucous membranes or the skin have not been reported.CausesSlightly more than 50% of the cases described are related to the minor trauma of hot foods,4 restorative dentistry,5 or periodontal therapy.6Other potential causes of angina bullosa hemorrhagica that have been mentioned in the literature are dental injections of anesthetics,4,7 steroid inhalers,8,7 and chlorhexidine gluconate mouthrinse.A report of 16 cases affecting the soft palate described hypertension as the most frequent underlying systemic condition (6 of 16 subjects); however, its relationship remains speculative, as hypertension is common in adults.9A causative factor is not identified in approximately 47% of patients with angina bullosa hemorrhagica.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 3, 2010
    • 08:11 PM
    • 0
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  • I, too, suffer from recurring blood blisters. About 2 years ago, my first one came. I got a big blood blister on my tongue. Then a week or so later, another one. I went to the doctor. He sent me to ENT doctor. They did an MRI. Nothing. Said to come the next time it happened. I did. They could find nothing. I put up with them. A few months ago, I was eating ice cream of all things, and maybe the cone caused the damage, but I felt one start to happen in the back of my throat and continue to fill up. I told my husband that if I start to gag and choke what was going it, it felt so constricting. I managed to bust it and made an appointment with the doctor the next day. She could find no reason. She did do some blood tests. She tested me for autoimmune diseases, thinking she would find nothing. I was tested for Lupus, RA, and a few others. Nothing. So no rhyme or reason. I got another one Saturday and busted it and my tongue has been so sore. I will not go back to the doctor. It does no good. Why did these not start until I'm 46 years old? And why do the doctors think I'm nuts? Good luck and I hope the answer is found someday.
    Anonymous 1 Replies
    • December 7, 2010
    • 02:43 AM
    • 0
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  • I had gotten a very large one on the roof of my mouth back towards my throat, that I believe, was caused by taking Actonel.I have been having blisters inside of my gum lower than the tooth surface.I have also been on Actonel for about 10 months. I cannot findany information where it says that is a side effect.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 27, 2010
    • 07:56 PM
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  • The answer is MSG in much of our food supply. It is masked by a dozen different names, too. It's even in toothpaste. Try organic.Oh god! Go away with your MSG BS. You don't know a thing about this topic obviously.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 12, 2011
    • 05:07 PM
    • 0
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