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How do I know if my son has Autism

Posted In: Medical Stories 30 Replies
  • Posted By: stayceeb7432
  • January 15, 2007
  • 05:43 AM

My son does not make much eye contact, he doesnt speak or listen, and does not respond to his name. But in everything I read, autistic children do not like to be hugged, touched, smile, and laugh. My son does all these things. Still at times he walks on his toes and I don't know what to think. He will be 3 in 5 months and doesn't talk. Should I be worried

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  • My son does not make much eye contact, he doesnt speak or listen, and does not respond to his name. But in everything I read, autistic children do not like to be hugged, touched, smile, and laugh. My son does all these things. Still at times he walks on his toes and I don't know what to think. He will be 3 in 5 months and doesn't talk. Should I be worriedHi, I know it almost 4 yrs. later since your original post, but I couldn't help but wonder what the outcome was for your son? I came across this post while searching for signs of Autism. And what you wrote, is exactly what seems to be for my almost two year old daughter. I look forward to your reply. :)Sue
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 13, 2010
    • 00:19 AM
    • 0
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  • My son is 2years old&6months.He walks sometimes on his toes and flap his hands. Sometimes he spins around.He is a lovely boy,who loves to be hugged and cudlled be me(mother),her older sister, and father.He loves to be kissed and play with his toys, enjoying watching tv especially tommy and jerry, the night gardens and teletubies.He speaks only a couple of words:yes, no, alo, how are you,mum. I spoke to the health visitor about his speech and they told me there is nothing to worry because he is bilingual child.Sometimes when he is watching TV or playing and you call his name he doesnt response. If you leave for a couple of minutes and do it again he will response in a second.Sometimes when he is very tired lying on the floor and keep shouting or throwing things away. He used to be worse,now not so bad.I am waiting to see a child doctor,but I've been told that there is a long quee.Please could the doctor tell me if my son do have autism or not.Please....
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I've been there myself as a parent. My son was about 2 when people off and on were telling me that he had "autistic like qualities". I would ask them if he was autistic, but they could not say anything because of lawsuits and all. I lived in denial for about 1 1/2 years until his pre-k teacher advised me to take him to a psychologist where he could be tested. I was about 28 when I got pregnant with him with no huge problems. He was diagnosed with Asperger's. I agree with some of the statements listed above as follows;* The don't make much eye contact when talking with you,* They tend to line up their toys in a line and pitch a fit when you disturb that line,* Either they love to be hugged a lot or might complain that a simple touch might cause them pain,* My son walked on his tip toes for at least 6-12 months,* They like to play mostly by themselves,* They hate it when you go a different route - example - you usually drive one way home and when you take a different route, they get really upset,* They flap their arms when really excited,* When taking them into a store with bright lights, they can't handle all the items, noise, etc...My son would run off from me right away when I took him into places like this when he was little,* They take longer to achieve things - crawling, walking, potty training, speaking, and any other motor skills. This is just some of the things my son went through. I'm not a specialist..just a single mom with a son who has Aspergers. He's now 15, but we still have issues. I wish you the best of luck. :)
    cag1967 1 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hello - I do not want to give you false hope, however, please keep in mind that all children are different. Instead of enjoying the first 2 years of my son's life I analyzed every little thing b/c I was convinced he had autism. He never cooed as an infant, never babbled, rarely even cried. He didn't say his first word until 18 months and didn't start talking until well over 2. He avoided eye contact, rarley smiled, did not like to cuddle and showed very little affection. I took him from specialist to specialist and had his hearing checked 3 times. He is now the happiest 5 year old normal litle boy. He is now advanced in language for his age has tons of friends. Turns out he just has a shy personality and was very serious little baby and wanted to sit back and take everything in until he attempted to talk. He now smiles non-stop but is still timid around strangers or in a new situation. Still not overly affectionate, but again, that's just who he is.By no means ignore the red flags that could be autism, but I guess what I am trying to say is just b/c he has a few, does not necessarly mean it IS autism. Every child is different!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • My son is 2years old&6months.He walks sometimes on his toes and flap his hands. Sometimes he spins around.He is a lovely boy,who loves to be hugged and cudlled be me(mother),her older sister, and father.He loves to be kissed and play with his toys, enjoying watching tv especially tommy and jerry, the night gardens and teletubies.He speaks only a couple of words:yes, no, alo, how are you,mum. I spoke to the health visitor about his speech and they told me there is nothing to worry because he is bilingual child.Sometimes when he is watching TV or playing and you call his name he doesnt response. If you leave for a couple of minutes and do it again he will response in a second.Sometimes when he is very tired lying on the floor and keep shouting or throwing things away. He used to be worse,now not so bad.I am waiting to see a child doctor,but I've been told that there is a long quee.Please could the doctor tell me if my son do have autism or not.Please.... The things you've said sound quite normal for a very young child. Ive seen many normal young children (toddlers) flap their arms. When tired it is normal for young children to play up, throw tantrums, throw things etc etc. From your post and his current age, it sounds as if you are over worrying. If he's still doing all these things thou in 18mths time, then you should consider an issue. (it is still then thou normal for children when tired to possibly throw something) Take care.. Ive seen very young children falsely diagnosed who turned out to be quite normal.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
  • hello. i'm 25 and i am Autistic. actually, most of my family is on the Autism spectrum. one of my godkids is also Autistic, and i have several friends who are as well, so i have a lot of first-hand experience with it. the first thing i'll say is that the original poster's child sounds like he could very well be on the Autism spectrum (though his hearing should of course be checked). not all Autistics are distant as children. in my family, most of us are really clingy and cuddly. my dad, my oldest brother, and i especially are this way. we've always been very affectionate, and show love through physical contact. the second thing i'll say is that Autism is not a disease, and that as an Autistic child grows, they do adapt to an extent naturally. also, even the most severely Autistic individuals have an average to above average IQ... they just don't have the means to communicate it. the most important thing in dealing with an Autistic child is to give them the means to communicate. also, don't sweat about the eye-contact. for an Autistic, making eye-contact triggers the flight or fight response, so even if the child won't look at you, it doesn't mean they aren't listening. i know i don't keep eye contact when i'm talking for any length of time.. i just look straight ahead, even if sitting next to the person. it's easier to look at people that i don't consider threatening, though. it shouldn't really interfere with the child's life that much. eye-contact is over-rated, anyways :) something else that's important when dealing with Autistic children (or Autistics in general) is that there are 2 different types of melt-downs. the first kind is the standard "tantrum" melt-down, and the other is more of a "freeze-up". when dealing with someone who has a tantrum melt-down, it's because the sensory overload is expressing itself outward. try holding them close and squeezing their head. this creates "neutral" stimuli that will cancel out some of the overload. things like flapping and stemming and rocking are also neutral stimuli to cancel out bad stimuli. for an Autistic that has freeze-up melt-downs, they may completely freeze, not be able to talk or function normally, and may cry silently. this is because their overload is expressing itself inward. it's like a computer with too many programs running at the same time. in this situation, the Autistic needs to be isolated in a dark quiet place where they can sleep it off and "reboot". the last thing i will say, 'cause this is probably far longer than it should be, is that a diagnoses of Autism isn't the end of the world. your child can still succeed. in fact, i recently graduated from university with honors. even if a child is considered "low-functioning", i know several of such individuals who can type quite eloquently, despite being unable to get the signal to speak to reach their mouth properly. these people have severe sensory integration disorder, which in turn leads to seemingly erratic behavior (which, by the way, is just more neutral stimuli generating) and resulted in them being treated as though they were retarded for much of their lives (before they got their hands on a computer and showed the world their intelligence!!) all Autism means is that instead of the few, long neurological pathways in the brain, there are shorter ones, but a lot more of them. so, information can miss its train, causing miscommunication, or end up on multiple ones, causing overload, but there are also a lot of great things that come with being Autistic. the analytical thinking skills, pattern recognition, and creativity in thinking strategically outside the box have made individuals on the Autism spectrum some of the worlds best scientists, inventors, architects, artists, and leaders in history. i wouldn't trade my Autism for anything!! :)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Just getting this off my chest. Im concerned my granddaughter (just turned 2) may have Autism.. (both myself and her mother has Aspergers). I rarely get to see my grandchild (ive only ever seen her 3 times) but one thing which is standing out with her is her lack of eye contact. Till last visit I'd never ever managed to gain any form of eye contact with her even for a few seconds. Last visit thou I managed to gain eye contact for a two seconds twice. Ive taken 100s of photos and only managed to get her looking at my face (at the camera) twice and in one of those shots the look goes throu you (like she's looking past..so wasnt focused on face/camera that time either). She isnt like purposely avoiding it but just on the go (short attention span dont help). My other daughter commented the other day about her how she's looking past her too and never directly at, in her photos to. This is completely different to my other grandchild who is only 5 mths old. I can get her eye contact so so easy. It dont come down to an odd rare chance thing. If I wasnt thinking she has probably Asperger's (not only her mother but her father too may have it.. he's got very Aspie traits but not diagnosed), I'd be wondering if she has ADHD as Ive noticed she was also quite different to the other children of her age or younger when we took her to the playground to play. Other wee children were happy to sit on a swing and be pushed. Her level of attention span is such that she pointed to the swing indicating she wanted to get on.. we'd put her onto it and just pushed her 2-3 swings and she went and jumped off of the moving swing falling to the ground (pushed herself under the safety chain), then ran to do something elese. No safety sense in 2 year olds I wouldnt say is abnormal but none of the other children were jumping off moving swings risking injury, all the other children were happy to sit on swing they wanted to get on for a while and be pushed (there were about 15 kids on the playground). The whole swing thing reminded me of my Aspie daughter when young and her complete disregard of safety sense (she got concussion 4 times and even went temporary blind and ended up in hospital due to it on one occassion due to her complete lack of safety sense and jumping off objects). My granddaughter just went from piece of playground equipment to another piece every 5-10 seconds.. she did this for 2 hrs!! (with us having to run after her watching her every move... if any child is in her way she just runs the other child down and sends them flying as if they werent there). Im currently 90% sure she has Asperger's just due to her lack of eye contact and her family history of it. (maybe with the playground stuff she's just a bit hyperactive and bosterous or something).
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
  • My son does not make much eye contact, he doesnt speak or listen, and does not respond to his name. But in everything I read, autistic children do not like to be hugged, touched, smile, and laugh. My son does all these things. Still at times he walks on his toes and I don't know what to think. He will be 3 in 5 months and doesn't talk. Should I be worriedMy son was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, a disorder on the autism spectrum, when he was five years old. He is now seven. He showed several similar issues as your son shows, at approximately the same age and I went through doctor after doctor and evaluation after evaluation with lots of frustration. My son is VERY bonded to his caregivers, and is very intelligent, but seems to be off in his "own little world" unless it is something that holds his attention, which right now, is Egyptian history. As his parent, you ARE his best advocate. Keep asking questions. Eventually someone will give you the right answers. Good luck~!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 17, 2011
    • 00:28 AM
    • 0
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  • Hi, my son rarely responding to his name and his attention is not perfect. other things are normal such as smiling cuddling playing and I watched many videos my son does not line up toys or things
    Anonymous 1 Replies
    • December 26, 2015
    • 10:09 PM
    • 0
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  • Hi, my son rarely responding to his name and his attention is not perfect. other things are normal such as smiling cuddling playing and I watched many videos my son does not line up toys or things
    Anonymous 1 Replies
    • December 26, 2015
    • 10:10 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
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