Discussions By Condition: Medical Stories

Hashimoto and B12

Posted In: Medical Stories 8 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • February 23, 2011
  • 08:06 PM

I was diagnosed with hashimoto thyroid disease at the age of 11. I am now 27 and been diagnosed with many more problems. I have gray hair, psoriasis, and sporiatic arthritis affecting the right side of my body, just to name a few. Recently, my endocrinologist has put me on vitamin b12 injections. Once a week for the first 4 weeks then once a month. I have felt the symtoms of hashimoto thyroiditis for so many years it is hard to decide what feels normal. And although I am taking 2 differnet kinds of thyroid medicine I am still symptomatic. I am on 137MCG of levothyroxine and 5mcg twice a day of liothyronine. Even with this dosage it is hard sometimes to get out of bed, much less take care of my family. I stopped taking the b12 shots for a period of time and of course, once again, my levels dropped. Is this something I will be doing for the rest of my life? And why does my body not absorb B12 like it should?
I have been to several endocrinologists in my years and none of which seem to have any real answers. None of the Drs. that I have been to are willing to remove my nogule ridden thyroid. Why is this? Would it not be easier on my body to remove and start from scratch with the medication? Maybe you can help to shed some light on this for me...
Thanks, Lisa

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  • I was diagnosed with hashimoto thyroid disease at the age of 11. I am now 27 and been diagnosed with many more problems. I have gray hair, psoriasis, and sporiatic arthritis affecting the right side of my body, just to name a few. Recently, my endocrinologist has put me on vitamin b12 injections. Once a week for the first 4 weeks then once a month. I have felt the symtoms of hashimoto thyroiditis for so many years it is hard to decide what feels normal. And although I am taking 2 differnet kinds of thyroid medicine I am still symptomatic. I am on 137MCG of levothyroxine and 5mcg twice a day of liothyronine. Even with this dosage it is hard sometimes to get out of bed, much less take care of my family. I stopped taking the b12 shots for a period of time and of course, once again, my levels dropped. Is this something I will be doing for the rest of my life? And why does my body not absorb B12 like it should? I have been to several endocrinologists in my years and none of which seem to have any real answers. None of the Drs. that I have been to are willing to remove my nogule ridden thyroid. Why is this? Would it not be easier on my body to remove and start from scratch with the medication? Maybe you can help to shed some light on this for me... Thanks, LisaHi Lisa,First, to get up to speed on all this, read the BASICS thread. It's not long. http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=62327Then give us your story at http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?p=268117#post268117 and your current SYMPTOMS (don't give diagnoses instead, but you can include them) and let's discuss it all. If you try to read the b12 thread it is quite long, so start at the most recent end so you get current information.
    Freddd 3576 Replies
    • February 27, 2011
    • 11:26 PM
    • 0
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  • It sounds like you are suffering from a series of autoimmune disorders: Hashimoto's, Psoriasis, Reactive Arthritis, B12 deficiency. I am sorry that is happening to you. You may want to consult an immunologist. Try taking your thyroid medication at night before you go to bed. You may find that it is more effective. Often, foods interfere with the proper absorption of levothyroxine. There is published research to support taking it at night. Are your TSH levels normal now (are you Euthyroid)?B12 deficiency is not uncommon. One theory is that intrinsic factor that is secreted in the stomach is deficient. Intrinsic factor is required for proper transport of B12. This may be to an autoimmune destruction of the cells in the stomach that release it. Getting an injection monthly directly into muscle bypasses this absorption problem. Muscles store B12 well... up to a years worth at a time. Keep taking the injections to get your levels to a normal baseline.
    blueempress 28 Replies
    • February 28, 2011
    • 04:21 AM
    • 0
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  • It sounds like you are suffering from a series of autoimmune disorders: Hashimoto's, Psoriasis, Reactive Arthritis, B12 deficiency. I am sorry that is happening to you. You may want to consult an immunologist. Try taking your thyroid medication at night before you go to bed. You may find that it is more effective. Often, foods interfere with the proper absorption of levothyroxine. There is published research to support taking it at night. Are your TSH levels normal now (are you Euthyroid)?B12 deficiency is not uncommon. One theory is that intrinsic factor that is secreted in the stomach is deficient. Intrinsic factor is required for proper transport of B12. This may be to an autoimmune destruction of the cells in the stomach that release it. Getting an injection monthly directly into muscle bypasses this absorption problem. Muscles store B12 well... up to a years worth at a time. Keep taking the injections to get your levels to a normal baseline. I do take my thyroid medicine at night. The Liothyronine and my anti-depressant Zoloft. The Levothyroxine and my other dose of Liothyronine I take in the morning. This doesn't seem to help much, neither do the b12 injections. I am wondering what, if anything, i can take (vitamin) to help my body?
    LisaDSea 3 Replies
    • February 28, 2011
    • 05:30 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • It sounds like you are suffering from a series of autoimmune disorders: Hashimoto's, Psoriasis, Reactive Arthritis, B12 deficiency. I am sorry that is happening to you. You may want to consult an immunologist. Try taking your thyroid medication at night before you go to bed. You may find that it is more effective. Often, foods interfere with the proper absorption of levothyroxine. There is published research to support taking it at night. Are your TSH levels normal now (are you Euthyroid)?B12 deficiency is not uncommon. One theory is that intrinsic factor that is secreted in the stomach is deficient. Intrinsic factor is required for proper transport of B12. This may be to an autoimmune destruction of the cells in the stomach that release it. Getting an injection monthly directly into muscle bypasses this absorption problem. Muscles store B12 well... up to a years worth at a time. Keep taking the injections to get your levels to a normal baseline.Hi Blueempress Getting an injection monthly directly into muscle bypasses this absorption problem. Muscles store B12 well... up to a years worth at a time.Just to keep it real, muscles do NOT store b12. They contain working b12 in the mitochondria. IM injections are fully absorbed into the blood within 30 minutes. The serum half life of a fresh injection is about 30 minutes. About 99% is excreted unchnaged in the urine within 24 hours according to research.Those of us who are healing all kinds of problems find that daily consumption of a 5 star sublingual adb12 and mb12 are 100 to 10,000 times more effective than a monthly cyanocbl injection. Those of us injecting find a subcutaneous injection far superior to the IM injection as it takes many hours to absorb hence keeping the serum level higher longer.Hashimoto's is an autoimmune disease thought to be triggered by low b12.
    Freddd 3576 Replies
    • February 28, 2011
    • 05:52 PM
    • 0
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  • Hi, I also am on thyroid meds, and am hypo, on my own I researched and found out about natural armour thyroid meds, I was on levethroxine 175mcg and I was always feeling tired, did not want to get up in the morning , wanting to take naps, in the afternoons. I had to convience my doctor to change to armour thyroid meds, not all doctors believe in this medicine. but honestly is helped me alot I don't feel the heavy weight on me in the mornings to get out of bed, and a lot of those symptoms went away, and I get tested all the time my levels are normal. I told my doctor i want to change and try this pill, its my body and if I have to take a pill for the rest of my life, I have a right to try and see which one makes me feel better! so she changed it! recently I was out of the armour pills so for 2 weeks I had to take my old pills, (levethroxine) I was feeling the heavy weight again in the morning and didnt want to get up, all the old symptoms again, when I changed back to armour thyroid , in few days all the symptoms went away :) I take 2 60 mcg of armour thryoid a day , first thing in the morning on empty stomach. so ask your doctor about natural armour thyriod meds, and try it for a month and see how it works for you :) it has worked for me, hope the info will help U !
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi Blueempress Getting an injection monthly directly into muscle bypasses this absorption problem. Muscles store B12 well... up to a years worth at a time. Just to keep it real, muscles do NOT store b12. They contain working b12 in the mitochondria. IM injections are fully absorbed into the blood within 30 minutes. The serum half life of a fresh injection is about 30 minutes. About 99% is excreted unchnaged in the urine within 24 hours according to research. Those of us who are healing all kinds of problems find that daily consumption of a 5 star sublingual adb12 and mb12 are 100 to 10,000 times more effective than a monthly cyanocbl injection. Those of us injecting find a subcutaneous injection far superior to the IM injection as it takes many hours to absorb hence keeping the serum level higher longer. Hashimoto's is an autoimmune disease thought to be triggered by low b12. Well, actually my Hashimoto thyroiditis is genetics. Most every female on both side of my family (paternal and maternal) have some sort of thyroid disease. Also just recently my Father was diagnosed with Hashimoto. In fact, the vitamin B12 deficiency was discovered many years after the Hashimoto. Thought to be caused by my autoimmune disease.
    LisaDSea 3 Replies Flag this Response
  • Well, actually my Hashimoto thyroiditis is genetics. Most every female on both side of my family (paternal and maternal) have some sort of thyroid disease. Also just recently my Father was diagnosed with Hashimoto. In fact, the vitamin B12 deficiency was discovered many years after the Hashimoto. Thought to be caused by my autoimmune disease.Hi LisaDSea,Genetics can play a big role in all this as a sizable percentage of b12 deficiencies run in families. You can work it out in all directions. If person x has b12 deficiency symptoms chances are one or both parents and grandparents, as well as children, siblings, grandchildren, cousins, etc will also have it. The problem is in the recognition, especially in children. As a child not too many would recognize b12 deficiency in the form of the following symptoms. I have myself to look at and all 3 of my children. The patterns become pretty obvious.STARTING AS INFANT OR CHILDdelayed myelinationfailure to thriveautismdelayed speechdepressionfrequent or continuous tonsillitisfrequent strepfrequent pneumoniafrequent long-lasting supposed viral illnesses that linger and lingereverything goes to the lungs for extended periodsheadachesgrowing painsskin problemsdandruffallergiesasthmacontinuous swollen glands in necklow grade fever for yearsNight terrorsProlonged hypnogogic state transitioning to sleepSleep paralysisSleep disordersseizurescoma Read more at http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=62327&ktrack=kcplinkA list with many of the symptoms is at http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=62327. You might find it interesting.There is nothing that screams out "b12 deficiency" unless you know to be looking for it, so it is usually unrecognized until the person turns older. The autoimmune responses that cause intrinsic factor problems are thought to be caused by b12 deficiency in the first place. The same with Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is often the first really obvious symptom, so it can certainly appear as if it came first. I was b12 deficient from shortly after birth, not so much that I died or it was terribly obvious, but it caused all sorts of apprantly unrelated problems that couldn't possibly have been recognized in the early 50s. I was diagnosed hypothyroid at 8 years old and it wasn't convincing to the doctors that I was deficient of b12 until age 55 even though I had over 200 symptoms, I didn't have the "right" ones to be so recognized. It's purely a definitional and recognition problem. Hyper-reactiveness to all sorts of things in all sorts of ways all appears tied to mb12 and methylfolate deficiencies. Many autoimmune problems are suspected.
    Freddd 3576 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi LisaDSea, Genetics can play a big role in all this as a sizable percentage of b12 deficiencies run in families. You can work it out in all directions. If person x has b12 deficiency symptoms chances are one or both parents and grandparents, as well as children, siblings, grandchildren, cousins, etc will also have it. The problem is in the recognition, especially in children. As a child not too many would recognize b12 deficiency in the form of the following symptoms. I have myself to look at and all 3 of my children. The patterns become pretty obvious. STARTING AS INFANT OR CHILDdelayed myelinationfailure to thriveautismdelayed speechdepressionfrequent or continuous tonsillitisfrequent strepfrequent pneumoniafrequent long-lasting supposed viral illnesses that linger and lingereverything goes to the lungs for extended periodsheadachesgrowing painsskin problemsdandruffallergiesasthmacontinuous swollen glands in necklow grade fever for yearsNight terrorsProlonged hypnogogic state transitioning to sleepSleep paralysisSleep disordersseizurescoma Read more at http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=62327&ktrack=kcplink A list with many of the symptoms is at http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=62327. You might find it interesting. There is nothing that screams out "b12 deficiency" unless you know to be looking for it, so it is usually unrecognized until the person turns older. The autoimmune responses that cause intrinsic factor problems are thought to be caused by b12 deficiency in the first place. The same with Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is often the first really obvious symptom, so it can certainly appear as if it came first. I was b12 deficient from shortly after birth, not so much that I died or it was terribly obvious, but it caused all sorts of apprantly unrelated problems that couldn't possibly have been recognized in the early 50s. I was diagnosed hypothyroid at 8 years old and it wasn't convincing to the doctors that I was deficient of b12 until age 55 even though I had over 200 symptoms, I didn't have the "right" ones to be so recognized. It's purely a definitional and recognition problem. Hyper-reactiveness to all sorts of things in all sorts of ways all appears tied to mb12 and methylfolate deficiencies. Many autoimmune problems are suspected. Thank You for this information. It explains alot in reference to my oldest daughter. I have made her an appointment to go over this with her pediatrician. You are absolutely right about the b12 coming before the thyroid problems, or being the cause of... I believe this is a fact. With this list in front of me it seems clear. Do you have ay tips on ways to pursuade her pediatrician? Or specific test that should be done? What are some natural things that may boost my energy level? I am not much for energy drinks or smoothies. But I am very interested in feeling better. What do you suggest?
    LisaDSea 3 Replies Flag this Response
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