Discussions By Condition: Medical Stories

burning and numbness of feet and hands

Posted In: Medical Stories 8 Replies
  • Posted By: Numbmom
  • November 10, 2007
  • 05:18 PM

Over the last 18 months, I have had increasing pain and numbness of my feet. My primary care doctor sent me to a podiatrist, who in turn sent me to a neurologist. He did an array of tests including urine protein electrophoresis and lab tests. My glucose was slightly elevated at 115. The pain in my feet increased and I went to a podiatrist (another one) who diagnosed plantar fascitis. The plantar fascia was indeed tight and painful to touch. We tried stretches, orthotics, injections and eventually surgery for plantar fascial release on the right foot. Now, 6 months after the surgery, my numbness and burning have increased involving my fingers. I can relate the pain and numbness with walking across a burning cement driveway in the summertime.
By the way, my aunt (mothers sister) and my uncle (mothers brother) have burning and numbness in their feet (my uncles symptoms include his hands). Both non diabetic.
This is usually worse in the nighttime. I have modified my diet and am taking Cymbalta, lyrica for the pain and also metformin to keep my glucose down. I have insulin resistance with an abnormal 3 hour glucose tolerance test. I have had to take a 12 week leave of absence from work due to the extreme pain in my feet. All along this time period, I have had normal HgA1C's (5.0, 5.5)
Has anyone heard of debilitating peripheral neuropathy in non-diabetics?
I raised the question on hereditary peripheral neuropathy but my doctor dosen't think it is the cause and reluctantly ordered hereditary testing. The symptoms seem to be getting worse every day.

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8 Replies:

  • Can't give you an answer, but have used a simple remedy that works (mostly) for my burning feet...Place feet into cold water for a short time (no mmore than two minutes), remove, dry and then rub with lavender oil and rosemary oil (pure). These two oils will reduce heat and also ease pain. I thought this would be of no use to me, but I had enormous relief. I hope it works for you.Kes
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 23, 2007
    • 11:12 AM
    • 0
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  • Has Guillian-Barre Syndrome been explored ? Spelling may not be perfect. Google it and see if it may apply.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 23, 2007
    • 10:55 PM
    • 0
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  • Most doctors don't know this or believe it, but neuropathy, even in diabetics, is not caused by the diabetes. It is caused by low thyroid as indicated by a low body temperature. If you take a natural thyroid supplement and gradually increase the dosage till your basal axillary temperature comes up to normal, it will reverse or prevent neuropathy. For more info, read Hypothyroidism - The Unsuspected Illness by Broda O. Barnes (1976).Again, most doctors won't accept this, but the blood tests for thyroid are useless. Body temperature, which is controlled by the thyroid, is normally regulated to better than 1/10 of one percent. The T3 & T4 blood tests have a normal range of +/- 47%, and the TSH test has a normal range of +/- 89%. It's rediculous! If your body temperature stayed 4 degrees low you would die in a matter of days. If it is 2 degrees low, you are half dead with one foot in the grave. If your average temperature is even two tenths of a degree low, you will have some symptoms of low thyroid and need a thyroid supplement.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Could be a type of tetany caused mainly by low blood calcium (hypocalcemia). That is also a symptom of fabry's disease
    gr8tful 175 Replies Flag this Response
  • Might try this. Simple check of poor toe cirulation. I have mild frost-bite circultation damage to toes. Podiotrist recommended NITROBID 2% nitroglycerine cream (comes in a trube, prescription item). I rub it on when toes begin to swell, turn red, and "burn". Treats symptoms,; not a cure. Works for me. Good Luck.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Over the last 18 months, I have had increasing pain and numbness of my feet. My primary care doctor sent me to a podiatrist, who in turn sent me to a neurologist. He did an array of tests including urine protein electrophoresis and lab tests. My glucose was slightly elevated at 115. The pain in my feet increased and I went to a podiatrist (another one) who diagnosed plantar fascitis. The plantar fascia was indeed tight and painful to touch. We tried stretches, orthotics, injections and eventually surgery for plantar fascial release on the right foot. Now, 6 months after the surgery, my numbness and burning have increased involving my fingers. I can relate the pain and numbness with walking across a burning cement driveway in the summertime. By the way, my aunt (mothers sister) and my uncle (mothers brother) have burning and numbness in their feet (my uncles symptoms include his hands). Both non diabetic. This is usually worse in the nighttime. I have modified my diet and am taking Cymbalta, lyrica for the pain and also metformin to keep my glucose down. I have insulin resistance with an abnormal 3 hour glucose tolerance test. I have had to take a 12 week leave of absence from work due to the extreme pain in my feet. All along this time period, I have had normal HgA1C's (5.0, 5.5)Has anyone heard of debilitating peripheral neuropathy in non-diabetics?I raised the question on hereditary peripheral neuropathy but my doctor dosen't think it is the cause and reluctantly ordered hereditary testing. The symptoms seem to be getting worse every day. Hi Numbmom, A common cause of peripheral neuropathy is methylb12 deficiency. With the proper methylb12 therapy most of these neuropathies can be largly reversed though it may take substantial doses for some years. My previously numb feet, numb since 1993 have substantial feeling back and are improving currently. If they give you a serum cobalamin test and tell you it's "normal" doesn't mean a thing as people can have methylb12 responsive neuropathies at over 1500pg/ml. Cyanob12 and hydroxyb12 do not have the same action in reversing thse neuropathies. Come on over to http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?p=188948&posted=1#post188948, the b12 deficiency forum on these boards and learn how to have a good chance at healing your feet and hands. And if you happen to have a lot of other symptoms too, it will affect a lot of those. We have a list of about 300 symptoms that can go along with the neuropathies. Good luck.
    Freddd 3576 Replies Flag this Response
  • This does sound like Fabry's. Please Google "Fabry's Disease" to find out more about it.Other symptoms of Fabry's:ringing in the earsprotein in the urineRaynaud's and cold intoleranceDecreased sweating and heat intolerancejoint and body painsgas and diarrhea after eating certain things, such as cooked onionshuffing and puffing (may turn out to be cardiomyopathy from Fabry's)Elevated ESRhypothyroidismosteopeniaYou don't have to have all of these. Severity varies greatly, especially in females who can be mildly affected. If you think you may have it, get to a neurologist armed with a list of your signs and symptoms, and those of family members, for this is genetic.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Here's another inherited possibility that can cause these symptoms: familial transthyretin amyloidosis. Google it to find out more about it. I have these symptoms, and so did my father, his mother, sister, maternal grandmother, and maternal great grandmother. I am scheduled to have genetic testing for both Fabry's and transthyretin amyloidosis later this month. The therapies for those two things are very different so its very necessary to do the genetic testing.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
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