Discussions By Condition: Medical Stories

22 years old!! HELP!

Posted In: Medical Stories 7 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • April 15, 2011
  • 00:41 AM

Hi my name is Kate. I am 22 years old and have been in and out of hospitals and clinics for 2 years now. I am 5'7 tall and 110 pounds.( yes, I always had trouble gaining weight) Since I had my csection in 2009 I have been extremely fatigued, night sweats, chills, fevers from 99.9 to 101 on a regular basis. I find it hard to handle cold or hot weather. Before my csection my blood pressure was at the normal 120/80 as was it always before. Now, my BP gets as low as 80/44. It is usually 90/60 now. I have fainting spells and blackouts. The doctors did numerous tests and found NOTHING. I was told to increase my salt intake and water. I eat A LOT of salt and water. If I don't carry a water bottle with me, I get dehydrated really fast for some reason. I get really winded doing things. I workout almost everyday for at least an hour. I am always chasing my 2 year old son around everywhere so I know I am getting enough exercise. I have no idea what to do and this fatigue and fainting has taken over my life. Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

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7 Replies:

  • Your symptoms points towards a systemic disease of some kind, but it's not possible to give some real advice. It could be anything, realy. You need to keep a log of your symptoms so that you more easily can see the cycle of the disease. You need to know what has already been tested and labresults. Also if you have some other signs, like if you cough up anything or not. If you had traveled somewhere before this all started, etc. It could be far fetched, but TBC is worth a check-up.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi my name is Kate. I am 22 years old and have been in and out of hospitals and clinics for 2 years now. I am 5'7 tall and 110 pounds.( yes, I always had trouble gaining weight) Since I had my csection in 2009 I have been extremely fatigued, night sweats, chills, fevers from 99.9 to 101 on a regular basis. I find it hard to handle cold or hot weather. Before my csection my blood pressure was at the normal 120/80 as was it always before. Now, my BP gets as low as 80/44. It is usually 90/60 now. I have fainting spells and blackouts. The doctors did numerous tests and found NOTHING. I was told to increase my salt intake and water. I eat A LOT of salt and water. If I don't carry a water bottle with me, I get dehydrated really fast for some reason. I get really winded doing things. I workout almost everyday for at least an hour. I am always chasing my 2 year old son around everywhere so I know I am getting enough exercise. I have no idea what to do and this fatigue and fainting has taken over my life. Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Hmm, except for the fevers you sound as if you might have a B12 vitamin deficiency - or more accurately, an undermethylation issue. You should read this link and give the basic five supplements a try - it is verrrry simple to test this out with a one day trial of these supplements. I had every single one of your symptoms except for the slightly elevated temperature. The fatigue is a key symptom... My symptoms began following an epidural (or spinal block) for knee surgery. They worsened with pregnancy and epidurals for pain relief. These symptoms have all significantly improved following hte protocol below... My story can be found on the second link below ~sept 2009 til present... It's important not to substitute, specifically you need folate (NOT folic acid) and you need methylcobalamin (one of the recommended brands due to it's instability in light and resulting ineffectiveness when not properly handled). Go to this thread and read the protocol: http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=62327 Go to this thread if you have any questions: http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=9948&page=1609 Take care,Velha
    velha508 321 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hmm, except for the fevers you sound as if you might have a B12 vitamin deficiency - or more accurately, an undermethylation issue. You should read this link and give the basic five supplements a try - it is verrrry simple to test this out with a one day trial of these supplements. I had every single one of your symptoms except for the slightly elevated temperature. The fatigue is a key symptom... My symptoms began following an epidural (or spinal block) for knee surgery. They worsened with pregnancy and epidurals for pain relief. These symptoms have all significantly improved following hte protocol below... My story can be found on the second link below ~sept 2009 til present... It's important not to substitute, specifically you need folate (NOT folic acid) and you need methylcobalamin (one of the recommended brands due to it's instability in light and resulting ineffectiveness when not properly handled). Go to this thread and read the protocol: http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=62327 Go to this thread if you have any questions: http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=9948&page=1609 Take care,VelhaHi thanks for replying to my post. I called my doctor and his nurse told me I was tested for vitamin b12 deficiency in november so i asked for Methylmalonic Acid Test to make sure. I have no idea what to do if this doesn't show something!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi thanks for replying to my post. I called my doctor and his nurse told me I was tested for vitamin b12 deficiency in november so i asked for Methylmalonic Acid Test to make sure. I have no idea what to do if this doesn't show something! Hi Kat - PLEAASSE Read the links I provided in detail. It is VERY common to 'test' in the normal range and B12 can still be a problem for multiple reasons - - 1) The blood test does not distinguish between cyanoB12 and methyB12 (or adenosylB12) in your serum. For most people the problem is CONVERTING the toxic (cyanide) cyanoB12 to the active forms that are used by the body (methyl and adenosylB12). This is typically due to an issue with methylation, there are genetic variants to these enzymes that cause some to have poor conversion. 2) FOLATE - is another huge factor here. The enzymes which convert folic acid to folate (again, folate is what your body needs and can use) vary by 5 fold throughout the population. So, by supplementing folic acid you can actually be creating a problem. The small amounts of folate you may derive from your food are not 'picked up' in the flood of folic acid. YOu can't avoid folic acid if you eat processed foods. The government adds this to ALL flours!! 3) The normal range is set by the population being tested, that is, if a lot of people are deficient the range will be lower. In the US, you are 'in range' at 200 (forgot units?) or higher. In Japan, you need to be 500 or higher to be in range. People testing below 500 are deficient. 4) Once a deficiency had been present for some length of time it requires more to fix than just getting those levels above 500. In addition, you may have this deficiency and/or other mitochondrial deficiencies. For example, my 'chronic fatigue' was fixed by these vitamins but I also required high doses of carnitine fumarate for consistent energy. For many people there are genetic or aquired (through drug side effects) carnitine deficiencies that cause problems with blood sugar regulation and fatigue (among other things). You can easily look this up by googling "fatty acid oxidation disorders". The protocol I refered you too also recommend all of the common mitochondrial co-factors which are available as supplements. Trying all of these together and then whittling them down is the best way to ID if you are someone who is lacking one of them... Testing is ok, but really doesn't make or break this issue. A quick check of your CBC might also give you a hint - when B12 is low, red blood cells are large. Thus, numbers at the upper end of normal or above the normal range indicate a potential problem. After identifying this problem for myself I had my children's blood checked and one child showed a similar 'large' RBC... Finally, if you read and take seriously all of the information for the protocol (for example, taking potassium) you will find that a one day test usually can indicate if this is an issue or not. Buying just a single bottle of the recommended brand of B12 lozenges could give you your answer. Some people require; the basic five (including FOLATE) to not a change...then you go from there. I went to A LOT of doctors! I figured this out for myself by reading and decided this protocol made sense. I am no longer exhausted all the time and am able to enjoy my days with my toddlers instead of plopping them in front of the tv so I can rest... I wanted to add that the fevers CAN be indicative of this deficiency. When you are depleted, immunological malfunction also occurs and for some people this means they have trouble controling latent infections like EBV or mono...these can cause low grade fevers and swollen glands... good luck!!Velha
    velha508 321 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi Kat - PLEAASSE Read the links I provided in detail. It is VERY common to 'test' in the normal range and B12 can still be a problem for multiple reasons - - 1) The blood test does not distinguish between cyanoB12 and methyB12 (or adenosylB12) in your serum. For most people the problem is CONVERTING the toxic (cyanide) cyanoB12 to the active forms that are used by the body (methyl and adenosylB12). This is typically due to an issue with methylation, there are genetic variants to these enzymes that cause some to have poor conversion. 2) FOLATE - is another huge factor here. The enzymes which convert folic acid to folate (again, folate is what your body needs and can use) vary by 5 fold throughout the population. So, by supplementing folic acid you can actually be creating a problem. The small amounts of folate you may derive from your food are not 'picked up' in the flood of folic acid. YOu can't avoid folic acid if you eat processed foods. The government adds this to ALL flours!! 3) The normal range is set by the population being tested, that is, if a lot of people are deficient the range will be lower. In the US, you are 'in range' at 200 (forgot units?) or higher. In Japan, you need to be 500 or higher to be in range. People testing below 500 are deficient. 4) Once a deficiency had been present for some length of time it requires more to fix than just getting those levels above 500. In addition, you may have this deficiency and/or other mitochondrial deficiencies. For example, my 'chronic fatigue' was fixed by these vitamins but I also required high doses of carnitine fumarate for consistent energy. For many people there are genetic or aquired (through drug side effects) carnitine deficiencies that cause problems with blood sugar regulation and fatigue (among other things). You can easily look this up by googling "fatty acid oxidation disorders". The protocol I refered you too also recommend all of the common mitochondrial co-factors which are available as supplements. Trying all of these together and then whittling them down is the best way to ID if you are someone who is lacking one of them... Testing is ok, but really doesn't make or break this issue. A quick check of your CBC might also give you a hint - when B12 is low, red blood cells are large. Thus, numbers at the upper end of normal or above the normal range indicate a potential problem. After identifying this problem for myself I had my children's blood checked and one child showed a similar 'large' RBC... Finally, if you read and take seriously all of the information for the protocol (for example, taking potassium) you will find that a one day test usually can indicate if this is an issue or not. Buying just a single bottle of the recommended brand of B12 lozenges could give you your answer. Some people require; the basic five (including FOLATE) to not a change...then you go from there. I went to A LOT of doctors! I figured this out for myself by reading and decided this protocol made sense. I am no longer exhausted all the time and am able to enjoy my days with my toddlers instead of plopping them in front of the tv so I can rest... I wanted to add that the fevers CAN be indicative of this deficiency. When you are depleted, immunological malfunction also occurs and for some people this means they have trouble controling latent infections like EBV or mono...these can cause low grade fevers and swollen glands... good luck!!VelhaThank you sooo much for your post. it was extremely informative! I will definitely try this. ANYTHING for an answer. Doctors completely overlook such small things. Pretty sad.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I got my vitamin b12 checked ( that one acid test) of course it was normal. I had a sleep study and a multiple latency test. The doctor said that my sleep was consistent with hypersomnlence. I had a total time in bed of 455 minutes with inititial sleep onset of 12 minutes. SLeep stages breakdown were as follows: STage 1 sleep 9%. Stage 2 sleep 79% Slow wave sleep 8% and Rem 4%. The apnea/hypopnea index was estimated at about 0.5. Ekg revealed normal sinus rythm with average heart rate of72 beats a minute. no seizurelike activity. periodic limb movement index was less than 5. there were occasional sponatneous arousals from unclear etiologies. did not meet criteria for cpap. nothing that would sugggest narcolepsy.Had a basic metabolic panel which revealed mild hyponatremia with sodium 134. normal electrolytes, urine tox was negative.I have no idea what to do anymore! I cannot stop sleeping. I dont have depression. I keep having fainting spells. I have slept 36 hours this weekend. my fiance can barely wake me up.. when i do wakeup it takes only a few minutes to fall back to sleep. my bp is very low. i cant function or think at all. contstant head and neck pain and chills. if anyone has ANY idea of what this could be PLEASE HELP! lol I cant keep this up. Tried exercising everyday drinking a lot of fluids. nothing helps.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I got my vitamin b12 checked ( that one acid test) of course it was normal. I had a sleep study and a multiple latency test. The doctor said that my sleep was consistent with hypersomnlence. I had a total time in bed of 455 minutes with inititial sleep onset of 12 minutes. SLeep stages breakdown were as follows: STage 1 sleep 9%. Stage 2 sleep 79% Slow wave sleep 8% and Rem 4%. The apnea/hypopnea index was estimated at about 0.5. Ekg revealed normal sinus rythm with average heart rate of72 beats a minute. no seizurelike activity. periodic limb movement index was less than 5. there were occasional sponatneous arousals from unclear etiologies. did not meet criteria for cpap. nothing that would sugggest narcolepsy.Had a basic metabolic panel which revealed mild hyponatremia with sodium 134. normal electrolytes, urine tox was negative.I have no idea what to do anymore! I cannot stop sleeping. I dont have depression. I keep having fainting spells. I have slept 36 hours this weekend. my fiance can barely wake me up.. when i do wakeup it takes only a few minutes to fall back to sleep. my bp is very low. i cant function or think at all. contstant head and neck pain and chills. if anyone has ANY idea of what this could be PLEASE HELP! lol I cant keep this up. Tried exercising everyday drinking a lot of fluids. nothing helps.This is Velha, not signed in...only YOU can help yourself - If you read what i wrote and hte links closely you would see that your b12 can 'test' normal - this test means nothing, it does not tell you which form of b12 you have - if you have cyanocobalamin floating around in your serum you STILL have a deficiency in the active forms (methyl and adenosylcobalamin) - the test does NOT distinguish these forms...you have 'chronic fatigue syndrome', which is really a deficiency in active folate and b12 (folic acid won't help, you neeeeeeeeeed FOLATE)....you can either read the links and see the light or keep suffering...it's really easy to buy the SUGGESTED supplements (not some cheap drugstore knockoff) and see how you feel??? if you can run to the doctor and get a bunch of tests but don't want to bother to try that then you really don't want to feel better...
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
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