Discussions By Condition: Medical Errors

DEATH !!! did not treat chrohns disease while treating pancreatitis and gallstones

Posted In: Medical Errors 1 Replies
  • Posted By: jim12005
  • March 18, 2013
  • 01:34 PM

After 9 months in a medical facility, my father died from chrohns disease, fistula, and pancreatitis. He was diagnosed with chrohn's disease in August 2011 and given medicine. He was admitted for gallstones in May 2012 and they removed his gallbladder. 3 weeks later, he was diagnosed with pancreatitis and a pseudocyst in June 2012 and he was told to stay home for 4 weeks to let it pass. After 2 weeks, with severe pain, he was admitted July 7th for pancreatitis and a pseudocyst. The hospital must not have asked "what are your current medications" because they did not treat chrohns disease while treating pancreatitis and gallstones. In February 2013, they finally diagnosed AGAIN and treated his chrohn's disease with a steroid. Do I have negligence?

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  • After 9 months in a medical facility, my father died from chrohns disease, fistula, and pancreatitis. He was diagnosed with chrohn's disease in August 2011 and given medicine. He was admitted for gallstones in May 2012 and they removed his gallbladder. 3 weeks later, he was diagnosed with pancreatitis and a pseudocyst in June 2012 and he was told to stay home for 4 weeks to let it pass. After 2 weeks, with severe pain, he was admitted July 7th for pancreatitis and a pseudocyst. The hospital must not have asked "what are your current medications" because they did not treat chrohns disease while treating pancreatitis and gallstones. In February 2013, they finally diagnosed AGAIN and treated his chrohn's disease with a steroid. Do I have negligence?Seems to me you do, but I suggest you request a copy of all his medical records from all his doctors. If they become suspicious of a lawsuit, explain that you have a concern for similar issues with blood relatives. Since pancreatitis is an inflammation of the organ, any blood relative who has hypoglycemia or diabetes would have a valid concern to know what your father went through, as would any relative who is sensitive to any natural or artificial sweeteners. Once you ahve the records, scan them to preserve the contrast of handwritten notes. Then search each dr's/facility's entry papers (usually patients fill these out themselves), initial exams, and rely more heavily on handwritten notes instead of typed notes. Remember this..When a patient is in pain, they don't always remember their medicines or details. The recors may show your father informed drrs of his medicines and he inadvertantly erred by omission. Also see if you can identify page numbers on the records to see if the current pagination is the same or different than previously noted on a paper. Also, look through all the drs' med records to see who, if anyone, documented contact from the dr(s) you suspect are neglectful.The records may clearly show that someone else, not your father, informed the drs. If he had no one else there and he could not tell them himself, they might resort to blood testing to determine medicines and dosages, at which point you cannot fault the drs, as this is beyond due diligence on their part and shows their sincere concern and ignorance of his previous diagnosis. (At that point, you would have to prove the test results were wrongly interpretted or faulty in the testing method.) Also, look for any signed doc where the pt authorized OR even request the dr(s) contact his previous and/or concurrent drs. If your father or someone with him asked this, it is still the family's responsibility to provide the new dr the accurate name and spelling of the other drs as well as a way to contact that med professional, such as a city/state (they can look up a phone number from there) or a phone number.Examine the records with the attitude of looking for your father to be at fault, because that is how a dr's atty will examine the records. This will help you recognize more quickly whether there is real negligence or just a questionable medical evaluation. If it's questionable, at least you know the records and can consult an attorney with far more detail at your first meeting.I suggest you ask yourself who in the family, or if your father himself did, refill his medicines before his last trip to the hospital (I assume by your writing that he didn't leave the hospital after July 7th). Also, who in the family verified your father took all his medicines? Usually a relative takes on that responsibility, and the family is partially at fault for not ensuring the drs had all the information. Familiy members should ask questions of the drs, too. Is it possible you have a family issue here and not a medical malpractice suit? I don't see neglicence if your father was conscious and alert at any time between July and Feb, as he coud have recognized his meds, asked drs about his meds, tell them aqbout his history, and/or asked them to contact the other drs. Is there any reason your father might have had to dismiss his previous drs' diagnosis and assume they did not have anything important to offer? If he did not accept their diagnosis as correct, he could have stopped taking the meds before he went to the hospital, or may have deliberately omitted the other drs' info when asked. Finally, please continue this thread elsewhere. Your concern is more a legal issue, but this forum is more for problems getting an accurate diagnosis. Your father had the same accurate diagnosis twice. Seems to me that ends the applicability to this forum.
    ccurts 4 Replies Flag this Response
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