Discussions By Condition: Medical Errors

A brand new mom and the beginning of ***l

Posted In: Medical Errors 12 Replies
  • Posted By: MrsYoung
  • November 30, 2006
  • 01:42 AM

I was 19 years old when I had my first daughter...I know young, but I felt I would be ok.
Kaylee was born on March 1st, a beautiful little girl born via C-Section.
A month and a half later, April 17th, she had spiked a fever of 103F and was lathargic. Knowing that babies should not get a fever especially that high I phoned my friend to take us to the hospital. When I got there I was treated with little respect because I was a young mom. I was told that my daughter had a cold, which I argued because she did not have a stuffy nose or chest congestion. The doctor literally patted my hand and said "your just being an over-protective new mom". At this point I almost lost it on the doctor, but my friend calmed me down and we went home. All that night Kaylee wimpered like a puppy, and I knew in my heart she wasnt ok. The next morning, my 20th birthday might I add, my grandmother called to wish me a happy b-day, and I told her what was up. She told me to get her back to the hospital. As I was getting her dressed I notice small little bruises on her...thinking that they were just bruises from the night before from the doctor I didnt think anything of it.
I had brought Kaylee to the Children's Outpatient Centre, where I knew they would take me seriously.
As Kaylee was being triaged I mentioned the little bruises to the nurse and she demanded that I take off her harness (Kaylee was also born with dislocated hips). So I proceeded to take off the harness and to my shock those little bruises had grown to large, black marks that covered most of her legs. I paniced...I knew something was REALLY wrong. At that point the nurse ran out the room, and the next thing I knew a doctor in a mask and gown and was scooping her out of my arms and running down the hall way with her into a room filled with tons of people all in masks and gowns. I chased after them. As I was in the room with all that was going on, at this point no one told me what was going on...I finally grabbed someone and demanded to know what was wrong with my child. As it had turned out she was in the final stages of meningitis. I was told that if I had stopped for coffee on the way to the hospital she would have died in the car.
A lot after that was a blur. She was rushed to another hospital by ambulance with a doctor and nurse on board and was immediatly quarentined and hooked up to what looked like a million different wires. I was never so scared in my life.
7 days later she again spiked a fever and as it turned out she was then diagnosed with blood poisoning as a result of the meningitis. I had spent a total of 5 weeks in the hospital with little baby, watching her have brushes with death, standing by and listening her cry as more and more needles were put into her tiny little body. It was the hardest 5 weeks of my life, all of which could have been prevented if the doctor in the ER would have taken me a bit more seriously.
Today Kaylee is an extremely smart 4 year old with NO SIDE EFFECTS!!!
Unfortunitly with meningitis side effects can show many years later, so we are not out of the woods yet, but I am just happy to have my little girl happy and healthy.

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12 Replies:

  • I hope to God you went back and gave that ER DR a piece of your mind...
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 1, 2006
    • 07:16 PM
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  • I actually got more satisfaction then that. I spoke with the head of Infectious Disease about it and she brought it to the board. He was suspended without pay for 6 months.!!:)
    MrsYoung 10 Replies
    • December 1, 2006
    • 11:37 PM
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  • Mrs Young, I'm so very sorry that you and your little daughter were treated this way.I can relate as I was also a young mother at age 20, and my son was born prematurely. He had to be in the NIC-U and the nurses made me feel as if I didn't have any right to know what was going on medically with my son. When I took his chart off the side of the crib to read it, the nurse jump up and preceeded to say, "Can I help!" Over the last 25 years, the one thing that I learned the hard way - is being a mother we know our child better than anyone else and if we feel that something is wrong with our child it usually is - and we shouldn't let anyone (all doctors and nurses) tell us nothing is wrong - because many times they are horribly wrong. Use your mother's intuition "gut feeling" because it is usually always right. I'm so very happy that your daughter recovered and is well. It was your daughter's dislocated hips that caught my eye and I had to write to you and ask you what her pediatrician had to say about her hips?There is a connective tissue disorder that presents with this problem, have they checked her for this? I wish you all the best. Sincerely,A concerned motherCathy
    Daves Mom 5 Replies
    • December 15, 2006
    • 08:40 AM
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  • Mrs Young, I'm so very sorry that you and your little daughter were treated this way.I can relate as I was also a young mother at age 20, and my son was born prematurely. He had to be in the NIC-U and the nurses made me feel as if I didn't have any right to know what was going on medically with my son. When I took his chart off the side of the crib to read it, the nurse jump up and preceeded to say, "Can I help!" Over the last 25 years, the one thing that I learned the hard way - is being a mother we know our child better than anyone else and if we feel that something is wrong with our child it usually is - and we shouldn't let anyone (all doctors and nurses) tell us nothing is wrong - because many times they are horribly wrong. Use your mother's intuition "gut feeling" because it is usually always right. I'm so very happy that your daughter recovered and is well. It was your daughter's dislocated hips that caught my eye and I had to write to you and ask you what her pediatrician had to say about her hips?There is a connective tissue disorder that presents with this problem, have they checked her for this? I wish you all the best. Sincerely,A concerned motherCathy
    Daves Mom 5 Replies
    • December 15, 2006
    • 08:42 AM
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  • Thank you Cathy for your concern and understanding.My daughter was diagnosed with avascularnicosis...which is where the bone in the hip begins to deteriorate. Maybe this is what you were talking about. Luckily with young children the cartlidge tends to take over and fixes the problem and so far that is what is happening as of right now.Sincerely,Amanda
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 15, 2006
    • 01:13 PM
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  • Dear Amanda, Congenital hip dislocation/Developmental dysplasia Avascular necrosis (AVN) in which the femoral head-the ball of the hip-does not receive enough blood, a condition that can result in abnormal growth of the bone. I was diagnosed with Legg-Calvé-Perthes when I was 4 1/2 years old. So, I know what you and your little daughter went through. The treatment back in 1968 was quite different and it entailed being confined to a hospital bed in traction. I spent 14 months in the Children’s hospital. I was the only girl that had it, it’s more common in boys. Usually, if you get this when your very young, you usually don’t experience the degenerative problems later in life. (Legg-Calvé-Perthes is a degenerative disease of the hip joint, where a loss of bone mass leads to some degree of collapse of the hip joint, that is, to deformity of the ball of the femur and the surface of the hip socket. It is the idiopathic avascular osteonecrosis of the capital femoral epiphysis of the femoral head. It is caused by an interruption to the blood supply of the head of the femur close to the hip joint. It is also known as Perthes disease, ischemic necrosis of the hip, coxa plana, osteochondritis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head, or Legg-Perthes Disease or Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD). Legg Perthes isn’t related to a connective tissue disorders. I just wanted to give you this information, so that if in the future your daughter experiences any unusual problems such as additional joint dislocation or pain issues that you will be able to think of a possible connective tissue disorder. Sometimes it’s related with being double jointed. All my best to you and your daughter,Your friend,Cathy Check out:Fact Sheet Connective tissue dysplasiawww.chw.edu.au/parents/factsheets/pdf/connective_tissue_dysplasia.pdf
    Daves Mom 5 Replies
    • December 19, 2006
    • 05:57 AM
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  • Sorry, now you should be able to just click on itFact Sheet Connective tissue dysplasiawww.chw.edu.au/parents/factsheets/pdf/connective_tissue_dysplasia.pdf
    Daves Mom 5 Replies
    • December 19, 2006
    • 06:02 AM
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  • I hope this one works it's a HTML version - I'm not sure why the last one wouldn't fully highlite. Try this one: http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?p=hip+dislocation+connective+tissue+disorder&ei=UTF-8&fr=yfp-t-440&x=wrt&u=www.chw.edu.au/parents/factsheets/pdf/connective_tissue_dysplasia.pdf&w=hip+dislocation+connective+tissue+disorder&d=PDvnQEVuN4GU&icp=1&.intl=us
    Daves Mom 5 Replies
    • December 19, 2006
    • 06:18 AM
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  • Cathy,Thank you for the additional information it was very informative. I will most definitly keep all of that in mind if there are further problems with Kaylee's hips.Your FriendAmanda
    MrsYoung 10 Replies
    • December 23, 2006
    • 04:03 PM
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  • Hi, Yeah I agree that younger mothers are often treated poorly and not listened to as well. I have found though also that some male doctors just dont really listen to females either, so sometimes we are treated bad on that bases too. I was 19 yrs when I had my second daughter and thou she was born with an very obvious birth defect ..talipes (a club foot on one foot.. and her other foot had different problem), as a mother I knew and could actually clearly see she had a spinal problem as well. I took her to several doctors who thought I was just over anxious before one realised (by then she was about 6 weeks old) that yes.. she truely did have a spinal problem as well!!! and a serious one at that. She has a fairly rare condition called Caudal Regression Syndrome (it causes similar problems as Spina Bifia) and her talipes was just part of that.. My daughter is a teen now and I just posted the lastest misdiagnoses event involving her http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?t=6414 (in her life there have been so so many medical stuffups! etc which leaves me and her no longer trusting doctors). As a mother, its best always to trust your intuition.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • December 28, 2006
    • 07:55 AM
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  • Just had another appointment to look at Kaylee's hips and the news wasnt the greatest. Things thus far are not really changing. The doctor still didnt seem overly concerned. She said to come back in 2 years and if it is still a problem then we would discuss other treatments such as a bone graft...that scared me!Well I will have to see what happens...been through a lot already...as long as she is with me I am ok.Amanda
    MrsYoung 10 Replies
    • February 3, 2007
    • 10:07 PM
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  • I also have a frightening story about meningitis. The worst part for me is that I had all the obvious signs and was still sent home. When you go to an emergency room and your neck is so stiff that you cannot move your head and cannot touch you chin to you chest then there is a problem. My story you can read about on this site.God bless You saved her life!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 12, 2007
    • 02:10 AM
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