Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

What is wrong with me?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 5 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • May 17, 2007
  • 05:25 PM

Hi everyone,

I cannot seem to get a clear diagnosis. In 2003 or 2004, I had a wisdom tooth extracted on the right side of my face (it was deep into my nasal cavity). I experienced continued and constant, burning, tight, and digging pain. Talking and exposure to cool air excercebated the pain. I went back to the dentist; he did a x-ray and found that everything looked normal. I ultimately had 4 other teeth (2 at the top and 2 at the bottom; right side) extracted and had a root canal (bottom right), believing that these procedures would relieve the pain. I ultimately had another tooth extracted (the root canaled tooth). The dentist also re-opened the wisdom tooth extraction site, and shaved the bone down. I had temporary relief, which only lasted for a couple of hours. Unfortunately, the pain returned and worsened. I went to an oral surgeon; she also conducted an x-ray and everything look normal. Like the dentist, the oral surgeon re-opened the wisdom tooth extraction site and shaved the bone down. I had temporary relief but the pain returned with a vengence. Oh, I forgot to mention that I was starting to experience the burning, tight, and digging pain in the bottom extracted site. Therefore, the dentist re-opened that area and shaved the bone down. Pain worsened. I eventually went to the department of the county hospital. The oral surgeon noted some scarring in the bottom area of the extracted site. They took an x-ray and found that everything looked normal. He said that he could not do anything for me and referred me to a university hospital to see an enthodontist. I chose to go to the oral surgery department, which I am so happy that I did. The head of the department examined and interviewed me. He concluded that I do not have a dental problem, but a neurological problem. The doctor suspected that I had Trigeminal Neuralgia. He urged me to go to a neurologist or to pain management as soon as possible. I immediately went to a neurologist and he also suspected that I had TN, and referred me to get an MRI to rule out any neurological disorders. The test results concluded that I had a minor deviated septum; there was no indication of a neurological disorder such as multiple sclerosis. I could not afford to see the neurologist, so I went to pain management at a county hospital. Upon examination and interview, the doctors diagnosed me with atypical neuralgia. They immediately prescribed several medications. The doctors also gave me nerve blocks and lidocaine shots. They increased dosages and conducted several nerve blocks and lidocaine shots, but nothing worked. Pain Managment recanted their diagnosis and referred me to ENT (ear, nose, and throat) and neurosurgery. The ENT doctor examined and interviewed me and suggested that I had alveolar nerve damage (neuroma). He also said that it looked like that the dentist removed a good chunk of my jawbone when he did the bone shaving. He referred me to oral surgery. In the meantime, I went to neurosurgery. He also suggested that I have neuroma and told me to continue seeing pain management. I went to oral surgery and upon examination and interview, the doctor conducted an x-ray. He did not see any abnormalities but did not some scarring on my gums at the bottom right side. The oral surgeon gave me lidocaine shots; I felt numb on my lips, face, and tongue, but not in the gums where I feel the pain. The doctor concluded that I could not possibly have neuroma because I feel pain not numbness in the tongue or lips. Also, I did not respond to the lidociaine as far as pain relief is concerned. The oral surgeon referred me to get a CT scan. The results came out normal. He suggested that the pain is central, not local; so I should get pain management to do a stellate ganglion injection (in the neck). I had the procedure done; I felt the effects (e.g. droppy, red eye) but no pain relief. I went to the neurologist and told him what the oral surgeon said regarding ruling out neuroma. The neurologist said that what the oral surgeon said is not exactly true, you do not have to have the symptom of numbness in order to have neuroma (alveolar nerve damage). I feel like I am in lingo. I have yet to get a clear diagnosis so that I can recieve the necessary treatment. I am 29-years-old and rely on my sister and mother to speak for me because it hurts so bad to do so. I have degrees in Political Science and Criminal Justice and I was hoping to obtain employment in either fields. It is impossible to do so because when I am not distracted by the pain, I am a zombie due to the effects of the medication. I desperately need some help in obtaining a dianosis so that I can get the necessary treatment. I have done countless research regarding diagnosis procedures for nerve disorders. I have suggested these procedures to the doctors and all they do is give me excuses as to why these procedures cannot be use. I apologize for the long letter, but I have been experiencing this pain for about 4 years and I wanted to included as information as possible. Thank You to anyone who can help me.

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5 Replies:

  • please read last 4 pages of "It's a mystery until we solve it"...here on this site...mommy cat This is an organic neurological disorder which wreaks havoc with almost every body system I'm so sorry for all you have been through passing this site along www.ahummingbirdsguide.com look at symptoms page you do not need every symptom many are upset because I've suggersted this to several you won't believe the responses Best to You...mommy cat
    mommy cat 1654 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi Irt,First, I have to say, that I have a terribly difficult time reading a big block of print that doesn't paragraph (mild LD's) so I've thrown in some random paragraphing, and am looking at your post. I cannot seem to get a clear diagnosis. In 2003 or 2004, I had a wisdom tooth extracted on the right side of my face (it was deep into my nasal cavity). I experienced continued and constant, burning, tight, and digging pain. Talking and exposure to cool air excercebated the pain. I went back to the dentist; he did a x-ray and found that everything looked normal. I ultimately had 4 other teeth (2 at the top and 2 at the bottom; right side) extracted and had a root canal (bottom right), believing that these procedures would relieve the pain. I ultimately had another tooth extracted (the root canaled tooth). The dentist also re-opened the wisdom tooth extraction site, and shaved the bone down. I had temporary relief, which only lasted for a couple of hours. Unfortunately, the pain returned and worsened. I went to an oral surgeon; she also conducted an x-ray and everything look normal. Like the dentist, the oral surgeon re-opened the wisdom tooth extraction site and shaved the bone down. I had temporary relief but the pain returned with a vengence. Oh, I forgot to mention that I was starting to experience the burning, tight, and digging pain in the bottom extracted site. Therefore, the dentist re-opened that area and shaved the bone down. Pain worsened. I eventually went to the department of the county hospital. The oral surgeon noted some scarring in the bottom area of the extracted site. They took an x-ray and found that everything looked normal. He said that he could not do anything for me and referred me to a university hospital to see an enthodontist. I chose to go to the oral surgery department, which I am so happy that I did. The head of the department examined and interviewed me. He concluded that I do not have a dental problem, but a neurological problem. The doctor suspected that I had Trigeminal Neuralgia. He urged me to go to a neurologist or to pain management as soon as possible. I immediately went to a neurologist and he also suspected that I had TN, and referred me to get an MRI to rule out any neurological disorders. The test results concluded that I had a minor deviated septum; there was no indication of a neurological disorder such as multiple sclerosis. I could not afford to see the neurologist, so I went to pain management at a county hospital. Upon examination and interview, the doctors diagnosed me with atypical neuralgia. They immediately prescribed several medications. The doctors also gave me nerve blocks and lidocaine shots. They increased dosages and conducted several nerve blocks and lidocaine shots, but nothing worked. Pain Managment recanted their diagnosis and referred me to ENT (ear, nose, and throat) and neurosurgery. The ENT doctor examined and interviewed me and suggested that I had alveolar nerve damage (neuroma). He also said that it looked like that the dentist removed a good chunk of my jawbone when he did the bone shaving. He referred me to oral surgery. In the meantime, I went to neurosurgery. He also suggested that I have neuroma and told me to continue seeing pain management. I went to oral surgery and upon examination and interview, the doctor conducted an x-ray. He did not see any abnormalities but did not some scarring on my gums at the bottom right side. The oral surgeon gave me lidocaine shots; I felt numb on my lips, face, and tongue, but not in the gums where I feel the pain. The doctor concluded that I could not possibly have neuroma because I feel pain not numbness in the tongue or lips. Also, I did not respond to the lidociaine as far as pain relief is concerned. The oral surgeon referred me to get a CT scan. The results came out normal. He suggested that the pain is central, not local; so I should get pain management to do a stellate ganglion injection (in the neck). I had the procedure done; I felt the effects (e.g. droppy, red eye) but no pain relief. I went to the neurologist and told him what the oral surgeon said regarding ruling out neuroma. The neurologist said that what the oral surgeon said is not exactly true, you do not have to have the symptom of numbness in order to have neuroma (alveolar nerve damage). I feel like I am in lingo. I have yet to get a clear diagnosis so that I can recieve the necessary treatment. I am 29-years-old and rely on my sister and mother to speak for me because it hurts so bad to do so. I have degrees in Political Science and Criminal Justice and I was hoping to obtain employment in either fields. It is impossible to do so because when I am not distracted by the pain, I am a zombie due to the effects of the medication. I desperately need some help in obtaining a dianosis so that I can get the necessary treatment. I have done countless research regarding diagnosis procedures for nerve disorders. I have suggested these procedures to the doctors and all they do is give me excuses as to why these procedures cannot be use. I apologize for the long letter, but I have been experiencing this pain for about 4 years and I wanted to included as information as possible. Thank You to anyone who can help me.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi Again,Wow. 4 years is a long time to deal with mouth pain. It took some doing, but I've read through everything you wrote (hah...I thought it was hard to read, I can't imagine how hard it was for you to GO through it!) Now, I'm no doctor, but the only thing that makes sense to me about your description, is that you must have some kind of neurological system that is different than normal. :rolleyes: But seriously...the ganglion injection should have worked. The fact that it didn't suggests that somehow the nerves from your teeth are wired up differently than anyone is expecting. And doctors are lousy at dealing with people who don't fit the regular mold.Perhaps you wrote it, but I am not clear about something: have you ever had shots of Novocaine that went straight into the place where the pain is? I think they did when they did the surgeries, but I'm not sure from the way you wrote it. I just have to interject here, that simply READING your post makes my mouth hurt. Really.So I'm going to make a strange suggestion...I think you should see an acupuncture doctor. Now, an acupuncturist isn't likely to give you a diagnosis, they will just work at helping the body deal with the problem. But there is something extremely strange about the way your nervous system is wired in your teeth/mouth/jaw. And as long as you keep going to regular doctors who keep treating you like your wiring is "normal" then I think you are going to keep getting no where.Finally, please list what procedures you have suggested, that the doctors said won't work. I agree with the doc who said it is central, but the difference, is I think it is somehow not centrally coming through where they think it is. Like when you throw off the breaker switch to install something in the house, but instead of every electrical thing in that one room going off, one thing stays on? Well, I have a feeling your pain is something like that. I look forward to hearing back from you.Best,Shula
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Still, it is good work to spread the info. You will see that M.E. cases seldom get help, while they need it much. This is not only due to ignorance, there are many factors involved. It would be realistic to not expect any help, not to look outside for it. When we think there is help or love or joy to be found in the outside world, we are deluded, and M.E. shows us this like no other.
    mommy cat 1654 Replies Flag this Response
  • Wow, same symptoms and exact treatment/procedures; I have m/s thoughNo relief....
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 19, 2009
    • 04:31 PM
    • 0
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