Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

What is wrong with me??

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 6 Replies
  • Posted By: Hersheygurl
  • December 17, 2008
  • 03:57 AM

Hmmm i have white patches in my mouth and have had them for some time. i don't understand what's wrong it won't go away. i have been tested for HIV/AIDS but the test came back negative but that was like 9 months or more ago. i don't why i have these patches in my mouth, my wieght is inconsistent, and my tongue is smooth because i have been using brown Listerine to try to clear it up but its not working. This is worrying me to death because i don't know what's wrong and would like to know.

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6 Replies:

  • My advice is to stop using Listerine, whch may do more harm than good. Try here: http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/sym/mouth_white_patches.htm
    aquila 1263 Replies
    • December 19, 2008
    • 08:48 PM
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  • I am no medical expert, but I think you have thrush of the tongue, which I have also had. are you run down, have you been taking antibiotics, have you been generally under the weather? You can go to any pharmacy and they will give you an ointment for your tongue, and if it is thrush, it will go away. It sounds like it is just a fungal infection, like athletes foot (but of the tongue!) - in my view, nothing to worry about. If it doesn't clear up within 5 days of treatment you should see a medical specialist. Hopefully it will clear up and you won't need to. Also, I agree with the other respondent - if it is Thrush, listerine will make it worse....
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 19, 2008
    • 10:15 PM
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  • It surely sounds like thrush,but there are other causes for white lesions in the mouth.Go to a dermatologist.:)
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • December 20, 2008
    • 04:01 PM
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  • I was reading in here someone else who had the same symptoms as you and the doctor said they had Leukoplakia. See if this helps you. Im not sure if youve been to the doctor since this posting or if you have been diagnosed.
    Kaauzz 11 Replies
    • December 27, 2008
    • 03:56 PM
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  • Leukoplakia is one of the white mouth lesions I was thinking about.
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • December 27, 2008
    • 04:42 PM
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  • I would agree that a number of conditions can result in the appearance of whitish patches on the oral mucosa and since we haven't the critical benefit of direct visual examination, it might be best to approach the question from the standpoint of the most likely candidate with respect to the historical basis of your symptoms. Oral thrush that is persistent for a period of 9 months would be considered exceptional and would generally represent an underlying disorder that would have presented further symptomatology by this time. It is, however, very easy to determine whether oral candadiasis is responsible. You can take a full tablespoon of normal white table vinegar and swish it constantly in your mouth for a full minute or two and repeat it for 2 days. If it's oral thrush, it will magically disappear. You also don't mention whether you are presently taking any medications and it's important to realize that certain drugs can produce oral thrush as a side-effect but I don't think we're dealing with thrush anway. Leukoplakia most commonly tends to appear as a single lesion, or alternatively 2 or 3 proximal lesions at most and are strategically located in the oral cavity of persons who either chew tobacco products or smoke a pipe or cigars. This form requires constant contact between the oral mucosal tissues and the offending products. It is generally considered pre-cancerous and unless you smoke a pipe or chew tobacco, I'm going to call this one a luke-warm possibility as well. There are other conditions like variants of stomatitis that can arise, such as that associated with herpes simplex or aphthous ulcers, but are usually quite painful and quite easy to diagnose. One possibility that can occur in the absence of underlying disease and become chronic is mouth-breathing. Persons who develop sinus conditions, most often in the form of vasomotor rhinitis, or alternatively have dental abnormalities, can at some point resort to mouth-breathing that takes place most often at nightime during sleep. Realize that the oral mucosal membranes can become dry as a consequence and readily take on the appearance of whitish patches that if chronic, can remain for months or even years. Some persons even develop geographic tongue, wherein the patches cover the distal surface of the tongue but it is not universally present. There are preparations that are intended for use by geriatric patients who experience dry mouth that can help reduce the incidence. Because of the timeframe, I would be more suspicious of something like mouth-breathing because it appears to be unaffected by time and does not grow worse. Incidentally, Listerine and similar products have a very high ratio of alcohol, which is dehydrating and if indeed you are mouth-breathing, it will only aggrevate the circumstances. Realize that most offending bacteria in the mouth is anaerobic in nature, meaning that it thrives in low oxygen circumstances. In order to actually kill such bacteria, you must use products such as hydrogen peroxide, typically mixed 50:50 with water. Alcohol-based mouthwashes are actually nothing much more than a gimic because the nature of the alcohol causes one to not only experience of stimulating effect by the contact of alcohol in the mouth, but also a psychological effect that it is killing germs. It really doesn't even serve to provide better breath for a period of more than a minute or two. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • December 27, 2008
    • 08:36 PM
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