Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

What do I do????

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 2 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • November 2, 2006
  • 01:51 AM

I'm SO afraid!!!! I've been diagnosed with anovulatory cycles, but I'm not so sure that's what it is. I've been diagnosed with ammenoreah, but every other doctor says that's not what it is. I'm just not sure what to do or where to go.

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  • Here hon I found this for you and I hope it gives you some peaceWhat is an Anovulatory Cycle, what causes it and how to prevent it? Anovulatory CycleBy definition, an anovulatory cycle is a menstrual cycle in which ovulation fails to occur. This means that you do bleed but do not release an egg or ovulate. Hence the term anovulation. This is normally supposed to happen during menopause. If it does happen before then anovulation translates into difficulty in conception or infertility. Anovulatory cycles tend to occur occasionally throughout the childbearing years, but are most common during adolescence and in the years before menopause ("perimenopause"). Causes and Prevention of Anovulatory CyclesAnovulation can arise from a number of causes, ranging from diet and exercise to complex disruptions in the relationships between tiny glands in the brain that control our most basic functions. Some causes are relatively easy to identify, whereas others are much more difficult.Hormonal imbalances are the most probable cause of anovulatory cycle. A prolonged, strenuous program of exercise, such as running, can interfere with the ovulatory cycle by suppressing the output of hormones called gonadotropins from the hypothalamus in the brain. Anxiety and other forms of emotional stress can also take their toll on normal ovulation.The disorder may also result from eating disorders, hypothalamic dysfunction, hyperprolactinemia, polycystic ovary syndrome, luteal phase defects, or tumors of the pituitary gland adrenal gland or ovaries. Other causes of anovulatory cycles are primary ovarian failure, resistant ovary syndrome and autoimmune oophoritis.Another possible contributor to anovulation is the long-term use of certain medications. Steroidal oral contraceptives (the Pill) are sometimes responsible. These drugs work by intentionally disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, suppressing ovulation and thereby preventing pregnancy. For women using long-acting injectable steroid contraceptives (Depo-Provera), it appears likely that the longer the contraceptive is continued the more likely it is that amenorrhea will result.Once you know the probable causes of anovulation, you must take care to avoid any of these, especially if you have a history of fertility problems. Avoid any strenuous exercise without consultation and do not attempt to try out fad diests as these may lead to anovulatory cycles. Learn to manage stress and develop a healthy lifestyle to keep this disorder at bay.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 2, 2006
    • 03:28 AM
    • 0
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  • What prompted you to see a doctor? Irregular periods, pain, or are you trying to get pregnant? I was also told I had anovulation, and probably only ovulated 5-6 times a year instead of 12. I would go usually between 60 and 90 days between periods from the age of 12 to age 30, and when I did have a period, it was really light. I didn't really think much about it until I wanted to get pregnant. I went on a fertility drug for 6 months and became pregnant. That seemed to jump start my cycles. My periods were more normal and somewhat regular. I had 2 more children without fertility drugs. Now almost 13 years after having my 1st child, my periods are like clockwork and heavier. I sorta miss those days of few and light periods. I guess I just never felt like there was anything really wrong all those years of extreme irregularity, and it turns out it wasn't. I wouldn't worry too much, but keep seeing your gynecologist. Don't hesitate to express any and all concerns to him or her. If you don't like their answer, find another doctor.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 2, 2006
    • 08:03 AM
    • 0
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