Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Unknown cause of psychogenic seizures + stroke symptoms + chronic migraine?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 3 Replies
  • Posted By: Skies912
  • January 13, 2013
  • 10:01 PM


My Fiance had to goto the hospital few days ago because of stroke symptoms and periods of unresponsiveness. After 3 days, the only thing they could confirm was the ulceritive colitis and that the periods of unresponsiveness were called "psychogenic" seizures. She is conscious during this time, and can respond to directions (like squeezing my hand), but her face becomes paralyzed, thus unable to move eyes, or speak. She can also fully hear what is going on. Also, breathing is normal. After the 3 days, the hospital discharged her from the PCU because "we don't know what's wrong with her". CT, MRI, EEG and EKG came back "normal". Also, the weird thing is, something is making her thyroid levels perfectly normal -- not even the doctors know.

Some facts ::
- 22yrs old
- Has been diagnosed in the past with Hashimotos disease
- Has been diagnosed with ulceritive colitis.
- Had recent (within 5yrs) moderate brain trauma :: Moderate concussion.
- Has vertigo
- Has been diagnosed with diverticulitis.
- Has history of moderate-high general anxiety disorder & stress
- Recent episodes of depression.

I am really scared and worried because no one in the past 4 years i have known her has been able to figure this out. Yesterday, she had ~4 periods of "psychogenic seizures" in a row -- meaning, was able to be snapped out of it, but few seconds later fell back into it again.

Does anyone have any idea to what could be going on?

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3 Replies:

  • Infection with candida has been linked to a various of mental disorders and often wont show up from blood tests and is not yet accepted as a treat in western medicine. A good alternative doctor could help you with a diagnose. Also there are other fungal infections that can cause fungal meningites wich can cause serious disorders of the central nervous system. These are considered rare among "healthy" people and as the infection slowly progresses its not diagnosed correct as opposed to meningites caused by a virus or bacteria wich evolves fast and thus much easier to diagnose. Have you checked her scalp for any abnormalities like rash, thickening, or anything that seems abnormal?Hope youll find a solution quick
    molkosan 2 Replies
    • February 2, 2013
    • 06:55 AM
    • 0
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  • Hi, If you can find one in your area, get her to a migrane specialist and talk to them about hemiplegic migraine. They are really easy to treat with beta blockers and/or low level anti-epileptics and differ from notraml migraines in that with a regular migraine, the pain comes from the blood vessels opening and then closing; with a hemiplegic one, the blood vessels close and then open, which is why you can't treat it with a vaso-dialtor like triptan. I've know my migraines (before meds) to last up to two weeks, with episodes of non epileptic seizures lasting 10 days on and off, though with mine I have a GCS of 3. When I have a migraine, because of where it in my head, I lose my speech, (I know what I want to say, I can understand everyone around me but I can't get the words out, (expressive dysfasia) and my right arm goes all floppy. Hope this helps
    NavaJazz 1 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have similar issues, just posted a huge thread about it because no one can tell me what it is either. I also have seizure-like episodes, migraines, depression, anxiety, diverticulli. Sorry for your trouble, I'd be interested to know if you find anything out.
    AAMoore2 4 Replies Flag this Response
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