Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

too young for memory loss

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 65 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • October 16, 2006
  • 04:41 AM

I am only 24 but all of a sudden have developed significant memory loss. I can't remember the end of a sentance when I start it, get in the car and can't remember where I was going, forgetting names of every day objects, losing things, forgetting to do simple tasks. My father's side has a lot of alzheimers and both my mother and father have thyroid conditions. I don't know what is going on but I feel too young for this to be happening. Could it be early onset AD? Can a thyroid condition cause this? I have a problem with vertigo, could that be connected to this? Are there other symptoms I should be watching for (signs of a brain tumor, etc)? The memory loss is very significant and seems to affect every minute of my day. I am constantly thinking 'what am I forgetting, I just remembered something - what was it?':confused:

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  • It could be hypoglycemia. That and diabetes are becoming very prevalent. If you are young and eat terribly, or eat lots of sugar then it will affect your memory. Another symptom of hypoglycemia is mental fog, or confusion.-K
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 16, 2006
    • 10:55 AM
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  • It could be anything. My son and I got sick over a year ago with symptoms of being off balance, memory loss, slurred speech etc. I have spent over $15k out of pocket with still no answers. I, too, could not write a sentence because I could not remember what I was writing. My son could not remember his age or the school he went to and he was only 7. Thank goodness that went away. You need to see a doctor and methodically eliminate one by one, such as an MRI, thyroid tests, etc. Currently, I am waiting for results from a naturapathic doctor as we were tested for heavy metal toxicity and fungus. Hopefully, you will just recover. Maybe you have a vitamin deficiency; it could be as simple as that. But you should see a doctor. Good luck
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 17, 2006
    • 04:01 AM
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  • Lyme Disease Symptoms List1. Unexplained fevers, sweats, chills, or flushing 2. Unexplained weight change--loss or gain 3. Fatigue, tiredness, poor stamina 4. Unexplained hair loss 5. Swollen glands: list areas____ 6. Sore throat 7. Testicular pain/pelvic pain 8. Unexplained menstrual irregularity 9. Unexplained milk production: breast pain 10.Irritable bladder or bladder dysfunction 11.Sexual dysfunction or loss of libido 12.Upset stomach 13.Change in bowel function-constipation, diarrhea 14.Chest pain or rib soreness 15.Shortness of breath, cough 16.Heart palpitations, pulse skips, heart block 17.Any history of a heart murmur or valve prolapse? 18.Joint pain or swelling: list joints_____________ 19.Stiffness of the joints, neck, or back 20.Muscle pain or cramps 21.Twitching of the face or other muscles 22.Headache 23.Neck creeks and cracks, neck stiffness, neck pain 24.Tingling, numbness, burning or stabbing sensations, shooting pains 25.Facial paralysis (Bell's Palsy) 26.Eyes/Vision: double, blurry, increased floaters, light sensitivity 27.Ears/Hearing: buzzing, ringing, ear pain, sound sensitivity 28.lncreased motion sickness, vertigo, poor balance 29.Lightheadedness, wooziness 30.Tremor 31.Confusion, difficulty in thinking 32.Diffculty with concentration, reading 33.Forgetfuiness, poor short term memory 34.Disorientation: getting lost, going to wrong places 35.Difficulty with speech or writing 36.Mood swings, irritability, depression 37.Disturbed sleep-too much, too little, early awakening 38.Exaggerated symptoms or worse hangover from alcohol Dont ask your regular doc to do a test, theyr'e tests are worthless. Acurate tests can only be obtained from Igenex labs in Pablo CA.Lyme is supppsed to be a clinical diagnosis.Search on google for "seeking llmd lyme disease"also http://flash.lymenet.org is an excellent source to find a lyme doc in your area.both of you should persue this!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 17, 2006
    • 04:34 AM
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  • Short term memory loss can be attributed to a number of things, and not always anything devestating. Do not worry about Alzheimer's for another 40 or 50 years! See a neurologist to begin ruling out causes. It could even be environmental, such as mercury exposure (rare), even if others in your household do not experience your symptoms to the same degree. You could be more sensitive to something in your environment. Do you take the drug Topomax by any chance? This drug can cause all of these symptoms.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 17, 2006
    • 00:56 PM
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  • no on the Topamax, The only significant change in my health recently has been the birth of my so 4 months ago but he is my third child and I expefienced nothing like this after my first two. It doesn't seem to be getting any better and my husband tells me I am going through mood swings (Raging B*tch was the term I believe he used:)) but I don't even notice or remember being upset at him or the kids. He says I kida snap in and out of it.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 18, 2006
    • 02:46 AM
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  • Another thing - I am still nursing so I cannot go on any of the medication my doctor seemed to think might help - anti depressants. Do these really help memory problems - wow I had no idea! Shouldn't he test me for some conditions though too? I mean I just say "yeah, I can't remember anything" and he says "oh you need anti depressants" but what about some actual testing? Shouldn't things be ruled out before he diagnoses me with a condition that has no test to confirm it? What about the vertigo - it is becoming more and more prevailant. by the way I used to be able to type substantially better than this - sorry for the typos!!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 18, 2006
    • 02:52 AM
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  • Please get your thyroid tested. You may be hypo-thyroid
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 18, 2006
    • 04:11 AM
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  • I am experiencing the same problem. I have been on anti-depressants in the past as well to fix the "memory" problems. I am only 34. The pills worked some but never fixed it. I have since then come off them and all of the problems have returned. The pills wil help some though. My husband works at a nursing facility and was asking me if he should have me admitted. It was pretty bad. I would be driving down the road and forget where I was going. I would go to the store to pick up a few things and would have to call him repeatedly to ask, "What was I supposed to be picking up again?"I also have tremors of my head as well. There are other problems too. The doctors don't do anything, but say lets run more tests. My husband's insurance is not very good, so I hope it's not something too terribly bad.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 23, 2006
    • 04:03 AM
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  • I suffered all of the symptoms in the threads above and after years of thinking I was going crazy I finally tried eliminating dairy and yeast products from my diet... it changed my life dramatically!!!!! I am now a very strong believer in "you are what you eat".
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 3, 2006
    • 01:29 PM
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  • Hi Sjo, In my non-medical opinion, you sound like a prime candidate for hypothyroid, especially since thyroid problems run in your family. Request that your doctor run a full thyroid panel (TSH, Free T3, Free T4, and thyroid antibodies at the very least), and request a copy of the test results when they come in. Seeing your test results with your own eyes is very important when it comes to thyroid disease, because a lot of doctors are not up on the most recent research and literature, and will routinely fail to diagnose border-line hypothyroid. That said, there are tons and tons of conditions that can cause the sort of memory problems you describe, including everything that has been mentioned here already. Hypoglycemia is another possibility, and one that infrequently can actually be caused by hypothyroid. Keep pressuring your doctor to run all the tests he can, and continue to refuse antidepressants. I know there are a lot of people out there with a valid need for antidepressants, but I personally think that doctors waaaaaay over prescribe them. Antidepressants can mask your symptoms and cause you to go years and years and years without getting the proper diagnosis -- during which time, whatever it is that you actually have will continue to do damage to your body. So continue to pursue the physiological causes of your symptoms, and if any doctor continues to insist on antidepressants, do everything you can to get a new doctor. The answer to your problem is out there, and while it may be a serious condition, there's a lot left to rule out before you need to start worrying about Alzheimer's. Btw, I was diagnosed with hypothyroid with hypoglycemia and memory loss when I was 22. You're at the prime age for thyroid disease. ~Ryot
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 3, 2006
    • 07:41 PM
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  • Yeh same here - Anti-depressants helped my memory but then when i came off them i .... ***t what was i saying?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 4, 2006
    • 09:38 PM
    • 0
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  • I'd cut from my diet all known major food allergens. I would also cut aspartame and all the glutamates (hydrolized vegetable protein and MSG for starters) because they are suspected of causing alzheimers. Eat only whole grains, healthy meats, and a lot of fruits and vegetables. Cut out all junk food. A diet too high in cereal grains, which contain phytates, can interfere with mineral absorption so even as you eat whole grains make sure that your diet is not overly dependent upon them for calories.You might want to look into herbal or vitamin supplements that help with memory or brain function. There are many out there. Gingko is very good for memory, but there are others.You could be deficient in a mineral or vitamin that is crucial for memory. For instance, calcium, which is essential to brain function and can help improve memory and mood. Sugar depletes it in our bodies, robbing not only our bones and teeth and thus weakening them, but our blood as well, which supplies our brain and other organs with calcium. Are you nursing? If so, your calcium stores could be low. "Others who may be at risk for are those who use antacids that contain aluminum; those who are alcohol drinkers; those on diets that are low calorie, high protein or high fiber; those who are lactose intolerant; those who use cortisone; women who are pregnant; and those who are basically inactive." The Nutrition Almanac, p 105Do you ever get leg cramps? This is a good indicator of low calcium, but there may be other signs of low calcium such as ringing in the ears, irritability, headaches. If you take calcium you should take magnesium with it because they work together. The ratio of calcium to magnesium should be about two to one.Neurotransmitters are what allow your brain cells to communicate with one another. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that when low can result in forgetfulness, inability to concentrate, sleeplessness. "Alzheimer's disease appears to be due in part to a relative deficiency of acetylcholine in the brain, which may help to prevent the disease." Nutrition Almanac 4th edition, page 68Acetylcholine is formed from choline (found in fish and lecithin). Pantothenic acid (B5) (organ meats, meat, rice brans avocado, fish, legumes, sweet potatoes, baked potatoes WITH SKIN are high in B5) helps your body to make it. Generally, all the B-vitamins are helpful for mood and memory because as co-enzymes they are involved in many processes.By the way, I highly recommend the book Nutrition Almanac as a basic guide to nutrition. In the back of the book it compares many foods, both processed and health foods. You'll be amazed at the nutrient differences between commercially prepared foods (often low or nonexistent) and whole foods.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 10, 2006
    • 01:12 AM
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  • Addendum:For your vertigo read page 210 of the Nutrition Almanac for causes and supplementation that can help.P.S. Just because Alzheimer's runs in your family doesn't mean that you are fated to get it. Someday they may find out that it is more nutritionally caused than genetic and your family could have been helped. Maybe through your research and own efforts to help yourself you can help other members of your family to avoid this disease. You might want to look at pages 161-162 of the Nutrition Almanac where the book discusses studies where various nutrients have been used to help with alzheimers.Also see Section VIII where Nutrient Rich Foods are discussed.For instance, "Wild rice contains twice as much protein, four times as much phosphorous, eight times as much thiamine, and twenty times as much riboflavin as white rice" page 367 of the Nutrition Almanac
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 10, 2006
    • 01:24 AM
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  • After getting blood tests for thyroid problems if you still don't have an answer, please see a neurologist and get an MRI. I did extensive research in college on early memory loss and MS. Memory loss is often the first symptom but often no one realizes it because the more common symptoms have not started and diagnostic tests are not showing anything yet. Chances are that you do not have MS but if everything else (i.e. allergies, thyroid problems, hypoglycemia etc.) is rulled out it won't hurt to check
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 12, 2006
    • 02:29 AM
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  • Try going to the Chiropractor... when your back is misaligned or all funky it can lead to memory loss. I might as well add that I have the same issues and I am only 23, happily married with 2 sons and have started experiencing memory loss and vertigo after my first boy, as well as being more paranoid... I remember though, when I started going to the Chiro about a year after my first child, I felt so much better and all these things sort of subsided, and now I'm back to the point where I get confused when I'm trying to tell my own stories... I know I need to start going again... seriously though, the Chiro is something you should look into!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • post-partum depression? Lots of similar symptoms.
    rad-skw 1605 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hello,this is the first time i have used this site (as far as I can remember) so i hope you receive this. i too have a bad memory, also a natural state of mental 'blankness', inability to concentrate and a feeling of disconnection. I am only 30. I would love to meet other people like me....it feels so frightening and lonely and I have been diagnosed with depression this month too. Have you found out any answers?Get in touchNadia UK
    wickerwoman 2 Replies
    • August 10, 2007
    • 06:46 PM
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  • Hello,this is the first time i have used this site (as far as I can remember) so i hope you receive this. i too have a bad memory, also a natural state of mental 'blankness', inability to concentrate and a feeling of disconnection. I am only 30. I would love to meet other people like me....it feels so frightening and lonely and I have been diagnosed with depression this month too. Have you found out any answers?Get in touchNadia UKI have been exceptionally good with my memory till about 17 yrs of age, when things changed all of a sudden. I am 33 now and memory is been the one thing thats turned me upside down. Single too (intentionally) for that single reason. I have started of late my own research and like someone mentioned earlier a full thyroid test is the first test to start with along with a lipid profile and u maybe a serum b12 level check.....do email me with your findings....keep an eye for the borderline results which most general physicians overlook and block u from seeing an endocrinologist!!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 19, 2007
    • 09:33 AM
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  • Hello,this is the first time i have used this site (as far as I can remember) so i hope you receive this. i too have a bad memory, also a natural state of mental 'blankness', inability to concentrate and a feeling of disconnection. I am only 30. I would love to meet other people like me....it feels so frightening and lonely and I have been diagnosed with depression this month too. Have you found out any answers?Get in touchNadia UKHi I am 36 years old and i also have been experiencing memory loss. To the point were i have been out of work for 9 months. I'm so happy to have a cell phone so i can call on my family to help when i forget things while i am out. I sometimes i feel it may be MS. But my doctor says no. I also suffer sever joint pain in my feet and finger and neck.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 27, 2007
    • 03:47 PM
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  • I have read that an underactive thyroid can cause memory problems. Have you been checked by a doctor for thyroid problems, if not I recommend you do so. And, by the way, I have an underactive thyroid and depression and have the same types of memory problems.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 7, 2007
    • 07:28 AM
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