Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Too Young For Memory Loss.

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 3 Replies
  • Posted By: Pandie
  • February 16, 2009
  • 04:16 AM

I am twenty-three years old and have been dealing with slow memory loss (long term mainly) for eight years. When I was fourteen years old, I had the rafters in my father's garage fall ontop of me, and with it came down the two air conditioners, a solid oak door, and an old fashoned steel framed mirror. I've been told that I was rushed to the hospital and was declaired alright, minus a few cuts and scrapes. My mother tells me that she was instructed to wake me at two hour intervals to ensure I did not have a concusion. So, ultimately, I have chalked up most theories concerning my memory loss to a result of such incident, even though my mother was told otherwise when admitted to the local hospital at this time. Unfortunately, I have gradually noticed a chance in my ability to recall thing's that I should otherwise remember. I have absolutely NO personal memories of my life prior to fourteen years of age. The thing's about my childhood that I DO know, are merely memories formed from stories I've been told over and over again by family. Honestly, I thought nothing of this. What's a few forgotten years, right? However, I've slowly begun forgetting more often and recalling quiet a bit less. Thing's I SHOULD remember I have no recolition of, be it a couple years ago, or a week ago. I cannot remember HOW I met even the closest of friends (six years ago, to three months ago). Details don't seem to stick. I cannot remember people's names, though I can recognize their face as one I've spoken with before. I can't recall how I know someone, where I met them, or even what we talked about if it's been over a week since that conversation. I recently had my first child five months ago, and have no memory of the c-section or the time spent in the hospital afterwards. I remember minor details, but nothing fixed comes to mind. When I bring this up with my family doctor, it is brushed aside and basically chalked up to normal memory responses, however it worries me that if it is something that seems to be progressing, that I'll soon be forgetting more then I care to bargin for. There are thing's in life we'd all like to forget, but I don't wish to forget ALL of it. Any advice or suggestions?

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3 Replies:

  • The causes of memory loss are myriad,so I suggest that you go to a site for''memory loss''to try to identify the problem yourself.
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • February 16, 2009
    • 00:28 PM
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  • Feel free to ignore Blaze's spam.
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • February 17, 2009
    • 00:15 AM
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  • Okay, there is a rather significant problem with attirbuting your difficulty to long-term memory loss. Initially, you can set aside the trauma circumstances as a causative factor here. The process of long-term memory is assoicated with two types of processing that lead to memory formation, declarative and implicit. You can think of declarative memory as episodic memory and semantic memory, the former being associated with recapitulation of events experienced over time and the latter referring to learned knowledge about the world around you, ie what a stop sign represents or the function of a credit card. Under implicit memory, sometimes called procedural memory, would be the memories associated with how to operate within the world, ie how to actually use a credit card or what sequential steps to take when approaching a stop sign. Also, there are forms of memory such as emotional memory that catalogs highly emotional events and physiological sensations. I diversify the classifications of memory to point out that the near entirety of your "loss" appears to be strictly associated with episodic memory-related events and will have to tell you here that initially, long-term memory loss from any type of neuropathology is remarkably rare and in instances where patients feel it's the case, the cause is most always due to stress. There is always some degree of memory decay in everyone as they age, but a person of your years would not be suffering from natural decay of the type described. It's important to realize this distinction because memory loss strictly targeted to episodic memory would represent an even more impossible phenomenon and if you were actually suffering long-term memory loss from trauma or other progressive neurological disorder, you would be describing difficulty in other areas as well, but this is not the case. The ability of facial recognition in the absence of name recall is often a clue that memory deficit of a degenerative form is not present. Also, it should be mentioned here that memory loss due to stress often affects episodic memory recall and short-term memory formation. Therefore, your symptoms as described would not constitute any type of degenerative process in my professional opinion. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • February 17, 2009
    • 00:42 AM
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