Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Thigh pain - Meralgia paresthetica

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 16 Replies
  • Posted By: LauraK1
  • November 6, 2006
  • 05:19 PM

For a month now I have been battling this pain I have in my upper outer left thigh. I had a nerve test done and the doctor said all my large motor skill were working fine. He indicated that I had a pinched nerve between my thigh and grion area. Since then I have been back to my Family doctor for treatment of the pain. So far nothing helps the pain...it may dull it but I still feel it. I went and looked up Neurophty since the Family doctor indicated that is what I have. After many sites I found the MP site and I believe that is what I have. Does anyone else have these problems and what are you taken...Thanks

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16 Replies:

  • I just went to my family doctor with the same complaints of numbness and tingling in the front of my thigh. He perscribed me Lyrica. I just started taking it and so far no change.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 10, 2006
    • 05:37 PM
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  • I also had thigh pain, first down the outside and then the inside and through the groin area. It is worse with walking, and then it settles down to an almost constant dull ache. Sometimes when I am sitting still, it goes away. Since I have a history (long time ago) of pulmonary emboli, the first thing they did was an ultrasound on my leg to make sure I didn't have a deep vein thrombosis. I didn't. Then, they tried steroids, and sent me for an MRI of my lower back, thinking it might be sciatica. The steroids calmed it down a little, but as soon as I was off them, the pain came back, just as bad, and worse. The MRI showed some bulging discs in my lower spine, and the beginnings of spinal stenosis. I was advised to go for physical therapy, and to see a spine specialist. The physical therapist gave me strengthening exercises, which made the pain worse. The spine specialist took some X-rays of my knee and hip joints, had some blood tests done, ordered a bone scan (As a person living with breast cancer, I had had two of these done before), and ordered physical therapy NOT to include strengthening exercises at this point, but just massage and ultrasound or other "soft tissue work" until the pain was better, and only THEN to start strengthening. The pain got worse. Then, the results of the blood tests and the bone scan came back abnormal, "suspicious" for metastatic disease in my thigh and maybe also my sacroiliac joint. MRIs were ordered, with and without contrast, for my thigh and pelvis. The pelvis came back looking OK, but something was showing up in my thigh bone. These tests and the lab results all point to my breast cancer having metastisized to my thigh bone via the bloodstream. Monday I see my oncologist, who wants more X-rays done, and then we will discuss what to do next. So, please make sure your doctors are very thorough when investigating your pain. It could be just a pinched nerve, or it could be something else entirely. For pain, I take tylenol and tramadol during the daytime, and vicodin and a muscle relaxant - flexiril - at night. Good luck to you.
    Begonia 2 Replies
    • November 10, 2006
    • 11:52 PM
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  • I have the same thing in my right thigh. I had the nerve test done, and they said it was neuropothy and want to put me on seisure medication. I refuse to go to that length, but the sharp shooting pains seem to be getting worse. I thought it was a pinched nerve, but they said no. I have been taking the B-12 vitamin for 2 weeks, but no change. I am thinking about an MRI. Do you have any suggestions?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 14, 2006
    • 02:24 AM
    • 0
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  • I think having an MRI, with and without contrast, is a very good idea. They can see a lot in an MRI, so it eliminates most of the guesswork. Once you really know what you're dealing with, then you can decide what medications to take. I went to my oncologist today, and she had me go for more x-rays of my thigh. The X-ray tech told me she could see the cancer in my thigh bone, so now I guess I just wait for the official word, and then all the bad stuff starts again - the chemotherapy, the radiation, and "possibly" surgery. Truly a bummer.
    Begonia 2 Replies
    • November 14, 2006
    • 03:31 AM
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  • I just went to my family doctor with the same complaints of numbness and tingling in the front of my thigh. He perscribed me Lyrica. I just started taking it and so far no change.I was prescribed the same - haven't taken it yet, but would love to hear it is working for you.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 19, 2006
    • 11:57 AM
    • 0
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  • LauraK1 thank you so much im in high school track and i was having that same kind of pains that you were and i couldnt find anything. thanks again for the help.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 15, 2006
    • 05:13 PM
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  • I took Lyrica for about 2 weeks and it didn't do anything for the pain. I have had the numbness, itching, and burning pain periodically in my outer right thigh for several (many) years. My Doc now has me seeing a physical therapist.My pain has really flare this school year. It is interfering with my workout program, esp walking and running. I can still ride my bike with no pain, I just don't get the same degree of workout. BTW I am 59 and have had this (with increasing pain) for quite a while.I am hoping that the PT will help!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 22, 2008
    • 06:43 PM
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  • I was prescribed the same - haven't taken it yet, but would love to hear it is working for you.Lyrica did not work for me. Ten years of cronic pain and burning. I went to a new Dr. and he put me on Gabapentin. Its working. Ask your Dr. If you can take this. Let him know what other Meds. you are on. He will know if you can mix them.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have pain in my upper outer thigh...it seems to be in my bone. It really hurts when Im laying on that side of my leg. I feel the pain all the time but it doesnt hurt unles I have pressure on it. Should I go to the doctors. Im worried about it but I have 4 kids and its hard to get to the doctors.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 2, 2010
    • 00:24 AM
    • 0
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  • My wife's pain started July 26 of this year. She woke up feeling achey like she had a touch of the flu. Over the next couple of days the ache settled in her left thigh. Over the next month the pain progressively got worse. Her pain always is in her left thigh and generally is worse at night. She has been to her primary physician, chiropractor, 2 orthopedists and a rheumatologist. She has had bone scans, CT scans, 2 MRI's, a nerve conduction study and countless amounts of blood work. All of her tests have come back normal. She has taken Darvocet, Percocet, Oxycodone IR, Flexiril, Gabapentin and Lyrica at different times to try to find some concoction that relieves her pain. So far nothing has proven successful. The pain has been so severe on occasion that we have made 3 trips to the E.R. for pain relief. Her rhuematologist has diagnosed her with Meralgia paresthetica. I'm not so sure this is correct as she doesn't fit really any of the typical patient profile for this condition. She is getting so tired of the pain and she has had to really scale back her lifestyle since she can't get any sleep at night and it takes her most of the day to get going. Any advice or suggestions would really be helpful. Thank you.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 8, 2010
    • 11:34 PM
    • 0
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  • It is always the wine drinking which is beneficial in cancer prevention cause it oxidises the body and prevents massive illnesses. issued by http://www.winegrowersdirect.com.au
    rahnjoseph 5 Replies
    • December 16, 2010
    • 01:47 PM
    • 0
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  • It is always the wine drinking which is beneficial in cancer prevention cause it oxidises the body and prevents massive illnesses. issued by http://www.winegrowersdirect.com.au
    rahnjoseph 5 Replies
    • December 16, 2010
    • 01:58 PM
    • 0
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  • My wife's pain started July 26 of this year. She woke up feeling achey like she had a touch of the flu. Over the next couple of days the ache settled in her left thigh. Over the next month the pain progressively got worse. Her pain always is in her left thigh and generally is worse at night. She has been to her primary physician, chiropractor, 2 orthopedists and a rheumatologist. She has had bone scans, CT scans, 2 MRI's, a nerve conduction study and countless amounts of blood work. All of her tests have come back normal. She has taken Darvocet, Percocet, Oxycodone IR, Flexiril, Gabapentin and Lyrica at different times to try to find some concoction that relieves her pain. So far nothing has proven successful. The pain has been so severe on occasion that we have made 3 trips to the E.R. for pain relief. Her rhuematologist has diagnosed her with Meralgia paresthetica. I'm not so sure this is correct as she doesn't fit really any of the typical patient profile for this condition. She is getting so tired of the pain and she has had to really scale back her lifestyle since she can't get any sleep at night and it takes her most of the day to get going. Any advice or suggestions would really be helpful. Thank you. Has your wife had any abdominal surgeries?
    dwnd28 3 Replies
    • February 24, 2011
    • 03:05 AM
    • 0
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  • If you have a complete examination and your doctors can’t find any other cause for your symptoms, then here is a suggestion. It might be a vascular problem. There is a condition called May-Thurner syndrome. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It does not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain); most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg and/or buttock. (Sometimes the anatomical structures are different and this can happen on the right side). If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. Another typical symptom is ambulating pain, the pain moves around depending on where the pressure is high at the moment. Also, the pain subsides when you lay down. This condition is vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only certain way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. If left untreated, there is a big risk of thrombosis either at the compression site in the left common iliac vein or in the left leg. Could this possibly help? The best of luck!
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • February 25, 2011
    • 11:37 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • If you have a complete examination and your doctors can’t find any other cause for your symptoms, then here is a suggestion. It might be a vascular problem. There is a condition called May-Thurner syndrome. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It does not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain); most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg and/or buttock. (Sometimes the anatomical structures are different and this can happen on the right side). If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. Another typical symptom is ambulating pain, the pain moves around depending on where the pressure is high at the moment. Also, the pain subsides when you lay down. This condition is vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only certain way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. If left untreated, there is a big risk of thrombosis either at the compression site in the left common iliac vein or in the left leg. Could this possibly help? The best of luck!I have exact same problem. I went to neurologist and he did nerve tests on me. I also have numbness in the bottom of both feet (both of which are sensitive to cold - becomes extremely painful) which he said was nerve damage. Could this be another symptom of Meralgia paresthetica? Basically he said all he could do was give me a shot in the lower back and that it was age related and would proceed to spread from my feet up my legs as I age. Also, the pain in my outer left thigh only occurs at night when I sleep on my back. Rolling over to my side makes the pain subside. This is the only time I have leg pain.My foot problems started a few years ago first with itching and burning, and now numbness and extreme pain.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Gabapentin (neurontin) has been the only thing that has helped my friend. She started with this one sat and by sunday the pain was better but not complete gone.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
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