Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Temporary Serious Vision Problem

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 3 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • December 4, 2008
  • 03:19 AM


Sudden partial loss of vision.
IDENTICAL pattern of total blackout in part of both eyes. I mean identical throughout the event.
This was 'U' shaped and covered a radial extent of about 20 degrees.
Slightly off center but in identical position in both eyes.
The remainder of the image was normal.
Scintillation of affected area increased minute by minute as the defect enlarged.
It weakened, enlarged, and moved slowly in the same direction in both eyes.
The effect gradually declined over a half hour and disappeared.
I have never had migraine or flashing in the eyes of any kind.
My blood pressure taken last week was 112/70. I am 71 years old, slender, active.

Immediate History:
I Used computer in brightly lit room and screen.
Vision normal. Eyes bright-adapted, presumably pupils constricted.
No drug use whatsoever of any kind: no alcohol, non smoker, no others e.g. amphetamine.
I went outside into dark for 2 minutes to move car into driveway, with headlights.
I do not recall any bright lights that I turned away from, just normal house lighting.
Come back inside.
Problem is immediately apparent, significant and distinctive.

My first impression was that I had been hit by a laser as we read about in the news, but this is a housing development in rural Thailand, so I think this is unlikely. It was also too spread-out to be that unless defocused. This lasted far longer than similar very quickly dissipating distortions caused by eye scanning across the sun or a welding torch or extremly bright lighting when pupils open.

Thanks for any help here.

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3 Replies:

  • If it was truly, completely, equal in both eyes, it points to something affecting the optic chiasm or farther back. The only real way to know, would be to see a physician.If it wasn't exactly equal in both eyes, but was so bright in one eye it seemed to affect both, it may be optic neuritis, optic migraine, or insufficiency of blood flow to one/both of the optic nerves.See a doc.Best of luck-B
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • December 7, 2008
    • 04:12 AM
    • 0
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  • Hi. I'm having some trouble understanding what you are describing here. Did you walk from a lit room into the night, and upon return notice changes in your visual field? Like the other gentleman said, a symettric process evolves before the chiasm. Additionally, the visual fields can be divided into quadrants. When field cuts occur, they are lost in symmetric fashion. I can't readily think of a way that the visual loss you are describing could occur and be attributed to a neurological source, however you would need confrontational testing during the episode to assess what was actually going on. It is difficult if not impossible to report what visual field deficits you are experiencing, because it would assume that you can report what you aren't seeing. A common way that some people will notice loss of the left temporal/right nasal field, would be to persistently report hearing 3 voices for the news anchors of their normal morning show, and only seeing 2 news anchors, they would lose the 3rd anchor, sitting farthest to right of the viewable screen. This instance serves to illustrate that people with neurologic field cuts aren't seeing black where vision should be, they aren't seeing anything, and won't notice, either unless forced to piece new evidence together.With that in mind, and the understanding that talking about stuff like this is a sad substitute for an exam, can you say anything more about your symptoms?
    fewd4thought 126 Replies
    • December 8, 2008
    • 03:51 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • could be an "eye worm"http://www.allaboutworms.com/loa-loa-eye-worm I use a Kantek screen that blocks radiation. It can affect eyes, but since you are where you are, it could also be a parasite.
    Monsterlove 2,921 Replies
    • December 8, 2008
    • 04:27 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
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