Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Sole numbness and purplish toes

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 4 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • March 18, 2008
  • 02:00 AM

I'm 51 white male, 260lb. I have a history of martial arts contact fighting and bodybuilding. Never took a steroid. Tried HGH but it did nothing. I work out a lot. Often 3 hours a day and very hard. I have a lot of muscle mass on my body and I am quite strong. I can still do situps on a 45 decline with a 100lb plate on my chest. Five years ago, I began to experience slight tingling on the bottoms of my feet. It got worse. About two years ago, I decided to take a break from my workouts. Disturbing symptoms set in. I would get a spasm in my back with my left hand seizing up like a claw. I had to press it on a flat surface to get it open and relieve the pain in my forearm. After a few weeks, that problem moved to my right. I began to feel some very very slight numbing around the ribcage. and the bottoms of my feet felt like I had broken glass just under the skin. Dr. said it likely heavy metal poisoning or MS. Blood test and brain scan were negative. The brain scan did show a stenosis in C5. Immediately, they blamed everything on that. The surgeon wanted me on the table in 48 hours. I refused because I wasn't convinced that the diagnosis was complete. They did a spinal tap and tested for over a dozen neuro problems. All negative. If I was going to have this surgery, I wasn't going to get it here in Montana. I went to UCLA and the chief of neurosurgery did the procedure himself. None of my symptoms changed. I know it can take several years. But the tingling in my feet got worse. Now I notice some bluish discoloration on the outside and end of my big toes where the nail meets the skin. It appeared simultaneously in both feet. The toes next to the big toes are showing a little discoloration as well. I have read that a cold or flue can cause this. I just got over a one-month nasty flue and this bluish toe showed up near the end of the flue. My wife, an RN, said it looks like gouty arthritis. Her friend, another RN, thought it didn't conform enough in appearance or severity to be gout. It is entirely possible that this bluish problem has nothing to do with the tingling. I'm not diabetic. My annual alcohol intake is less than a six pack every year. I eat very well and I understand nutrition. I am scared to death of more misdiagnoses. I have a pending appointment with a podiatrist. I figure he has seen more feet than any MD. Any qualified opinions would be greatly appreciated.

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  • Blue Toe SyndromePosted on Sep 03, 2007Blue toe syndrome is the bluish discoloration to toes as a result of tissue ischemia (lack of blood flow). The syndrome is caused by the blockage of small vessels that lead into the toes. One or more toes may be affected; in severe cases this can also manifest itself as a multi-organ problem. There are a few causes of blue toe syndrome but the most common is the breakage of a small piece of arterial plaque usually from the abdominal aorta-iliac-femoral arterial system (located in the abdomen and groin area) which then travels down the arterial tree into the small vessels of the foot where it becomes lodged. This is known as an embolism. All tissue distal (in front of) the blockage will then turn a bluish color which represents a lack of oxygen to the tissue. Generally patients are in their 40s, 50s, 60s, and older. The condition can occur insidiously or may be the result of abdominal surgery or an invasive vascular procedure or test.The affected toes become cyanotic but there are other etiologies such as trauma, connective tissue disease like Scleroderma, hypercoagulability of blood as seen in polycythemia vera , atrial fibrillation and Raynauds phenomenon. In Raynauds the fingers will usually also be involved and this generally occurs in younger patients without any known history of atherosclerotic disease. At the local level, blue toe syndrome may occur in diabetic foot infections and those who have undergone foot surgery.Blue toe syndrome is easily misdiagnosed because in most cases the larger arteries of the foot are palpable and that directs the doctor away from a diagnosis of occlusive disease. Treatment is geared towards alleviation of the blockage further up the arterial tree through stenting, bypass surgery, or anticoagulant therapy. Vasodilator drugs have no proven effectiveness in treatment of this condition, since this is not a vasospastic disorder. Mild forms of the disease which affect just the toes have a good prognosis and usually subside on their own. It should be noted that sometimes the pain in the toes is disproportional to the extent of involvement of the toes and adequate analgesics should be prescribed. Multi-systemic forms where the kidney is also usually affected, the prognosis is more dubious. In the foot, should the condition not resolve itself there is always the possibility that the condtion will worsen to gangrene and subsequent amputation of the affected toes.
    rad-skw 1605 Replies Flag this Response
  • Blue Toe SyndromePosted on Sep 03, 2007Blue toe syndrome is the bluish discoloration to toes as a result of tissue ischemia (lack of blood flow). The syndrome is caused by the blockage of small vessels that lead into the toes. One or more toes may be affected; in severe cases this can also manifest itself as a multi-organ problem. There are a few causes of blue toe syndrome but the most common is the breakage of a small piece of arterial plaque usually from the abdominal aorta-iliac-femoral arterial system (located in the abdomen and groin area) which then travels down the arterial tree into the small vessels of the foot where it becomes lodged. This is known as an embolism. All tissue distal (in front of) the blockage will then turn a bluish color which represents a lack of oxygen to the tissue. Generally patients are in their 40s, 50s, 60s, and older. The condition can occur insidiously or may be the result of abdominal surgery or an invasive vascular procedure or test.The affected toes become cyanotic but there are other etiologies such as trauma, connective tissue disease like Scleroderma, hypercoagulability of blood as seen in polycythemia vera , atrial fibrillation and Raynauds phenomenon. In Raynauds the fingers will usually also be involved and this generally occurs in younger patients without any known history of atherosclerotic disease. At the local level, blue toe syndrome may occur in diabetic foot infections and those who have undergone foot surgery.Blue toe syndrome is easily misdiagnosed because in most cases the larger arteries of the foot are palpable and that directs the doctor away from a diagnosis of occlusive disease. Treatment is geared towards alleviation of the blockage further up the arterial tree through stenting, bypass surgery, or anticoagulant therapy. Vasodilator drugs have no proven effectiveness in treatment of this condition, since this is not a vasospastic disorder. Mild forms of the disease which affect just the toes have a good prognosis and usually subside on their own. It should be noted that sometimes the pain in the toes is disproportional to the extent of involvement of the toes and adequate analgesics should be prescribed. Multi-systemic forms where the kidney is also usually affected, the prognosis is more dubious. In the foot, should the condition not resolve itself there is always the possibility that the condtion will worsen to gangrene and subsequent amputation of the affected toes. Hi rad-skw would it be possible for me to ask u a question on a problem i have, i have been looking the answers but so far i cant find them.As you give sound advise maybe u could help me........would u mind replying to me via post !!!not medical related!!! Thanks. tootsie :)
    Tootsie 628 Replies Flag this Response
  • I'm reporting this one as solicitation, Tootsie. LOL..........:D:D:D lolololololol Blaze behave !
    Tootsie 628 Replies Flag this Response
  • LOL..........:D:D:D lolololololol Blaze behave ! Oooooh yes its via the post !!!Not medical related!!! the question is medical..........eeeeeeeeeejit !!! :Dlol
    Tootsie 628 Replies Flag this Response
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